Focus on green recovery

share
Twitter

Stepping up green recovery actions

Building forward better

Green sectors offer prospects for job creation

Sustainable infrastructure helps reduce emissions

Sustainable infrastructure helps reduce emissions

Resilient agriculture ensures food security

Resilient agriculture ensures food security

Financing the green recovery

Tracking green recovery efforts and impact

Understanding the link between COVID-19 and environmental health

#ClimateAction

CAN CHANGE OUR LIVES FOR THE BETTER

Browse all related resources

filter by language
filter by content type
78 results available
Sort by date 
08/09/2020
Adopting more sustainable ways of managing the ocean is a global priority: protecting its health will bring benefits to all. Developing countries face specific challenges, as many depend heavily on ocean-based industries and are overly exposed to the consequences of ocean degradation. Enhancing their access to science, policy advice and financing would allow them to tap better into the opportunities of a more sustainable ocean economy, including more decent jobs, cleaner energy, improved food security and enhanced resilience, while contributing to the protection of the world’s ocean.This report provides policy makers in developing countries, as well as their development co-operation partners with a wealth of fresh evidence on (i) the latest trends in selected ocean-based industries; (ii) policy instruments, including economic incentives, to promote ocean sustainability in various contexts; (iii) the first review of development finance and development co-operation practices in support of more sustainable ocean economies, including a discussion of how development co-operation can help re-orient private finance towards sustainability.
Read in
01/09/2020
This report explores how countries can strengthen the resilience of their agricultural sectors to multiple risks. A shifting risk landscape in agriculture – due to increasing weather variability, natural hazards, pests and diseases, and market shocks – will require public and private actors to consider the risk landscape over the long term, place a greater emphasis on what can be done ex ante to reduce risk exposure and increase preparedness, and prioritise investments that build resilience capacities both on-farm and for the sector as a whole. This report offers a framework for applying resilience thinking to risk management in agriculture, and explores how four OECD countries – Australia, Canada, Italy and the Netherlands – are mainstreaming resilience into their agricultural risk management policy frameworks.
Read in
17/08/2020
Radioactive waste results from many different activities in health care, industry, research, and power production. All such waste must be managed safely, with the protection of human health and the environment as the highest priority. After decades of research, the international scientific community is now confident that placing high-level radioactive waste in deep geological repositories (DGRs) is both safe and effective.The government of each country has the absolute right and responsibility to implement the energy and environmental policies it believes are best. In the case of the disposal of radioactive waste, it is paramount that these debates should be informed by objective facts. This report therefore aims to provide the general reader with the current state of knowledge with regards to the management of high-level radioactive waste in DGRs.
Read in
23/07/2020
This note is an update of the earlier versions released on 27 March and 13 May. It provides analysis on issues related to the economic, social and environmental impacts, lessons learned in terms of digitalisation, mobility, density, urban design and collaborative governance, and action-oriented guidance to build back better cities, building on previous work on urban resilience.
23/07/2020
Global trade in illegal pesticides has been steadily growing in recent years, posing serious threats to agriculture, the environment, human health, and the economy. Evidence of this trend can be found in the increasing number of seizures of counterfeit, fake, and unauthorised pesticides, as well as their growing share in the global pesticide market. This paper identifies the main drivers and enablers of this illicit trade, and explores the potential of digital technologies, such as blockchain, to support policies to tackle this criminal activity. It also outlines the challenges in the adoption of these digital-based policy responses and discusses other available policy options.
Read in
03/07/2020
Ambitious environmental policies are necessary to enable the transition to a greener economy. However, these policies could impose economic burdens on firms through different channels. They may increase barriers to entry and distort competition. They may also impose transaction and administrative costs related to permitting and licensing. If stringent environmental policies can be designed in a way that minimises such economic burdens, they can facilitate the achievement of economic and environmental goals and a cleaner growth model.
Read in
02/07/2020
Since the scale of the economic crisis began to emerge, the IEA has been leading the calls for governments to make the recovery as sustainable and resilient as possible. This means immediately addressing the core issues of global recession and soaring unemployment – and doing so in a way that also takes into account the key challenge of building cleaner and more secure energy systems.As they design economic recovery plans, policy makers are having to make enormously consequential decisions in a very short space of time. These decisions will shape economic and energy infrastructure for decades to come and will almost certainly determine whether the world has a chance of meeting its long-term energy and climate goals.The Sustainable Recovery Plan set out in this report shows governments have a unique opportunity today to boost economic growth, create millions of new jobs and put global greenhouse gas emissions into structural decline. This work was done in collaboration with the International Monetary Fund.
Read in
02/07/2020
Global demand for materials has been growing over the past century, driven by a steady economic growth in OECD countries, the industrialisation of emerging economies and a growing world population. At the global level, materials use more than doubled between 1990 and 2017, and it is projected to double again by 2060. Due to the growing amounts of materials use, environmental pressures such as land degradation, greenhouse gas emissions and the dispersion of toxic substances in the environment are projected to more than double in the decades to come. In this context, improving resource efficiency and stimulating the transition towards a more circular economy has become crucial. In recent years an increasing number of governments have started implementing policies and strategies to meet this objective, but stronger efforts are needed to significantly improve the sustainability of materials management and the circularity of economies across the world.
Read in
26/06/2020
The focus of this brief is on the immediate steps that governments can take to ensure that emergency measures implemented to tackle the Coronavirus (COVID-19) crisis do not derail their efforts to address pressing environmental challenges and improve the environmental health and resilience of societies.
Read in
18/06/2020
Africa is projected to experience increasing climate hazards for the remainder of the 21st century, which are likely to pose a challenge to hydropower generation in Africa. To minimise the adverse effects of climate change, hydropower is needed to enhance Africa’s resilience to climate change. Resilient hydropower can play a key role in allowing Africa to meet the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), implement clean energy transitions, and adapt to climate change. This report aims to enhance the climate resilience of African hydropower through a climate risk and impact assessment, and by introducing potential resilience measures. It qualitatively assesses climate risks to African hydropower and examines potential climate impacts quantitatively, comparing two climate scenarios. Based on the assessment, it identifies measures to enhance climate resilience and provides policy recommendations.
Read in
05/06/2020
For the economic recovery from the COVID-19 crisis to be durable and resilient, a return to ‘business as usual’ and environmentally destructive investment patterns and activities must be avoided. Unchecked, global environmental emergencies such as climate change and biodiversity loss could cause social and economic damages far larger than those caused by COVID-19. To avoid this, economic recovery packages should be designed to “build back better”. This means doing more than getting economies and livelihoods quickly back on their feet.
01/06/2020
The sheer size of nuclear projects might be a barrier in some markets where private investors are looking for short‑term paybacks. However, during a period of economic recovery, large‑scale and long‑term energy infrastructure projects, such as nuclear power plants, can galvanise the social cohesion and economic spill‑overs required to relaunch general economic activity. Governments should incentivise investments in resilient low‑carbon energy infrastructure, such as nuclear energy, in the aftermath of the COVID‑19 pandemic. Proper policy and market frameworks to incentivise investment in essential infrastructure that supports low‑carbon electricity security and economic development are needed. Transitional, targeted government support for nuclear energy projects will be indispensable to unlock the benefits of nuclear energy in the post‑COVID‑19 economic recovery. Government support can and should be leveraged to attract cost‑effective private financing to deliver nuclear energy infrastructure projects. There is currently a window of opportunity for governments to support sustained cost reductions in nuclear energy projects through timely new build decisions – thus reinforcing the process of learning by doing and allowing these designs to move along their learning and cost curves.
Read in
01/06/2020
During the COVID‑19 crisis, nuclear power has continued to generate electricity reliably and around the clock, ensuring the continuous resilient operation of critical services indispensable to cope with the global health crisis and maintain social stability. Nuclear power has been an important source of power system flexibility, helping to maintain electricity security by operating in a load‑following mode, complementing the supply of variable renewable generation. Electricity security is an essential public need, at the same level as food security and access to health care.Nuclear energy is a key contributor to electricity security and already contributes positively to building a low‑carbon resilient infrastructure at the plant and system levels. Nuclear energy, both new nuclear projects and the long‑term operation of existing reactors, can play a key role in the post‑COVID‑19 economic recovery efforts by boosting economic growth in the short term, while supporting, in a cost‑effective manner, the development of a low‑carbon resilient electricity infrastructure in the long term.
Read in
01/06/2020
Nuclear power is capable of supplying large amounts of low‑carbon electricity and heat cost‑effectively while creating a large number of high‑value jobs in the local and national economies. The post‑COVID‑19 economic recovery is a perfect opportunity to create jobs and economic development while continuing to move ahead with the energy transition. Investing in nuclear energy creates a large number of high‑skilled jobs, accelerates the transition to a low‑carbon economy, and increases energy resilience.Nuclear energy projects are a proven way to create large numbers of long‑term, high‑skilled domestic jobs that pay premium wages. Nuclear projects provide high spill‑over investment into the local and regional economy.
Read in
01/06/2020
The NEA encourages governments to take advantage of the post‑COVID‑19 economic recovery to accelerate the energy transition towards meeting climate objectives. Post‑pandemic recovery plans to reconcile climate objectives with economic goals need to put system costs at the heart of energy policy. Nuclear energy projects achieve deep decarbonisation with optimal use of land and mineral resources. Moving to a carbon neutral electricity system without nuclear power would significantly increase system costs and threaten security of supply. Achieving cost‑effective decarbonisation requires structural reform of the electricity market.
Read in
28/05/2020
This paper evaluates green stimulus packages that were introduced in response to the global financial crisis (GFC) of 2007-08 and draws lessons relevant for greening the recovery from the Coronavirus (COVID-19) crisis. The paper underscores the importance of building in policy evaluation mechanisms into green stimulus measures. It also provides evidence that the implementation of sufficiently large, timely and properly designed green stimulus measures can generate economic growth, create jobs and bring about environmental benefits. However, there are also trade-offs between competing economic, environmental and social policy objectives, which underscores the importance of proper policy design.
Read in
27/05/2020
The OECD and the Directorate-General for Environment, the European Commission department responsible for EU policy on the environment, joined forces to examine current and future water-related financing challenges faced by EU member states. These include investments needed to comply with EU regulation for water supply, wastewater collection and treatment, and flood protection.As part of the research, new data was produced on current levels of expenditure for water supply, sanitation and flood protection, as well as on projected needs. It supported a comparison across member states and substantiated tailored policy discussions in selected countries and at European level. This report captures the rationale for the research, the main quantitative outcomes and the policy issues and recommendations that derived from this two-year co-operation. Lessons from Europe outlined in this report can inspire similar research and policy discussions in other parts of the world.
Read in
20/05/2020
Mitigating climate change requires aligning real economy investments with climate objectives. This pilot study measures the climate consistency of investments in transport infrastructure and vehicles in Latvia between 2008 and 2018, estimated at EUR 1.5 billion per year on average. To do so, three complementary mitigation-related reference points are used. Applying the criteria defined by the European Union Taxonomy for Sustainable Activities results in 4.2% of investments assessed as making a substantial contribution to climate change mitigation. Comparing actual greenhouse gas trajectories for each transport mode to a 2°C scenario from the International Energy Agency’s for the European Union and to projections from Latvia’s 5th National Communication to the UNFCCC, indicates 32% climate-consistent and up to 9% climate-inconsistent investments. The majority of investments volumes could at this stage not be characterised due to limitations relating to the granularity or coverage of the reference points. Comparing current trends to 2030 and 2050 decarbonisation targets nevertheless highlights future investment and financing challenges, especially for road transport. The methodology piloted in this study can be replicated and scaled up across countries and sectors, using different or complementary reference points specifically aligned to the temperature goal of the Paris Agreement.
Read in
21/04/2020
The coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic highlights the need for a comprehensive and integrated approach to human health. Enhancing environmental health through better air quality, water and sanitation, waste management, along with efforts to safeguard biodiversity, will reduce the vulnerability of communities to pandemics and thus improve overall societal well-being and resilience.
Show more 
Photo credits ©:Bicyclists cross wooden bridge © Nate Hovee/Shutterstock; Flip cards, Shutterstock
TwitterFacebookLinkedInEmail