The United States - DAC Peer Review of Development Co-operation

 

The United States is the world’s largest development and humanitarian donor by far. Its recent renewed ambition of global leadership on development is supported by new strategic orientations and ways to deliver development co-operation. These entail many positive aspects, including a policy focus on sustainable development, the elevation of the development pillar beside diplomacy and defence, a strengthened whole-of-government approach, a new emphasis on key principles for quality aid, and a renewed commitment to multilateralism. The US is also a leader in stimulating public-private partnerships, and is increasingly addressing climate change issues in its development co-operation programme.

This new dynamic, driven from the highest levels of the Administration, raises high expectations among stakeholders and partners of the US. While promising steps have already been taken, the implied reforms now need to be put fully into practice. This is challenging given the institutional and budget fragmentation of US development co-operation and the respective roles of the Administration and Congress. 

 

 

About
this review

United States' 
peer review history

 

Implementation of
peer review recommendations from 2006

United States PR 2011 Graph

Read more on the implementation of the peer review recommendations from 2006 

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Going from aid to development, stimulating public and private investments

Within government, the US is increasingly working across agencies to motivate all departments to contribute to development goals, using the policy-making capacity of USAID and the State Department to design initiatives that have the potential to gain clout. Recent presidential initiatives, such as Global Health and Feed the Future, harness a range of diplomatic, development, and technical capacities from across the US government. Likewise, since the creation of the Global Development Alliance in 2001, the US has been a leader in promoting public-private partnerships. These increasingly go beyond corporate philanthropy to address core business interests. The US Administration is also at the forefront in tackling corruption. Given its extensive experience, the US should assess the contribution of public-private partnerships to development. This could be shared with the donor community to feed into current debates on promoting development beyond aid. (Box 1.)

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