Health


  • 15-March-2016

    English, PDF, 317kb

    Fact sheet: Trends in Nursing Education in the United States

    There are two broad categories of nurses in the United States: licensed practical nurses (LPNs) or licensed vocational nurses (LVNs, and registered nurses (RNs). In addition, graduates from RN programs can pursue further education at the master’s (or doctorate) level to become Advanced Practice Registered Nurses (APRNs).

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  • 15-March-2016

    English, PDF, 465kb

    Fact sheet: Trends in Medical Education and Training in the United States

    New medical graduates then pursue their clinical specialty training (internship/residency), with the length of the training varying depending on the specialty. Overall, to become a doctor in the US, on average, a student can expect 10 to 16 years of higher education and post-graduate training.

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  • 7-July-2015

    English

    OECD Health Statistics 2015 - Country Notes

    Specific country notes have been prepared using data from the database OECD Health Statistics 2015, July 2015 version. The notes are available in PDF format.

  • 1-July-2014

    English

    Health-care expenditure and health policy in the USA versus other high-spending OECD countries

    The USA has exceptional levels of health-care expenditure, but growth slowed dramatically in recent years, amidst major efforts to close the coverage gap with other OECD countries.

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  • 1-July-2014

    English

    After Decline in U.S. Health Expenditure Growth, OECD Sees Risk of Spending Uptick in Recovery

    Gains made towards slowing health expenditure growth in the United States in recent years could be negated by price increases associated with the continuing economic recovery unless more efforts are made to contain spending, says a new OECD paper published in The Lancet.

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  • 21-November-2013

    English, PDF, 377kb

    Life expectancy in the US rising slower than elsewhere, says OECD Health at a Glance report

    Life expectancy has increased in the United States over the past decades, but less rapidly than in other OECD countries. This is due to gaps in health insurance coverage and proper primary care, poorer health-related behaviours and poor living conditions for a significant proportion of the U.S. population, according to a new OECD report.

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  • 5-November-2013

    English

    OECD report measures human cost of crisis; underlines need to invest in well-being

    The global economic crisis has had a profound impact on people’s well-being, reaching far beyond the loss of jobs and income, and affecting citizens’ satisfaction with their lives and their trust in governments, according to a new OECD report.

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  • 28-June-2012

    English, PDF, 416kb

    US health care system from an international perspective

    Data from OECD Health Data 2012 focusing on key US issues: why is the US health spending so high? Is US health spending higher due to higher prices or higher service provision? (or both?)? Is the quality of care better in the US? What are the trends in key risk factors to health in the US?

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  • 21-February-2012

    English

    Obesity: Mardi Gras - how fat are people this Tuesday?

    More people in developed countries are overweight or obese than ever before, dooming them to years of ill-health and early death. New OECD data show however that in some countries obesity rates are slowing, and that’s good news for people’s health and government budgets.

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  • 30-September-2009

    English, Excel, 376kb

    Why does the United States spend so much more on health than other countries?

    The United States spent 16% of its national income (GDP) on health in 2007, which is by far, the highest share in the OECD. This presentation was given by Mark Pearson, Head of OECD Health Division, to the U.S Senate Special Committee on Aging.

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