By Date


  • 5-June-2013

    English

    Putting Green Growth at the Heart of Development

    Green growth is vital to secure a brighter, more sustainable future for developing countries. Developing countries will pay a high price for failing to tackle local and global environmental threats because they are more dependent on natural resources and are more vulnerable to resources scarcity and natural disasters.

    This book presents evidence that green growth is the only way to sustain growth and development over the long-term. Green growth does not replace sustainable development, but is a means to achieve it. Green growth values natural assets, which are essential to the well-being and livelihoods of people in developing countries, and if policies are designed to respond to the needs of the poorest, green growth can contribute to poverty reduction and social equity.

    Building on experience with green growth policies in developing countries and extensive consultations with developing country stakeholders, this report provides a twin-track approach with agendas for national and international action. It responds to developing country concerns about the technical challenges arising from early efforts to “go green” and documents a wealth of examples from developing countries. Green growth objectives and policies will need to be mainstreamed into every government objective and most importantly, into national budgets. Green growth policies can use untapped opportunities to boost domestic fiscal revenues and attract quality investment for years to come. International co-operation is needed to help mitigate the short-term costs that may be associated with pursuing green growth. International flows of money, trade and technology know-how is vital to encourage pursuit of green growth in developing countries.

  • 29-May-2013

    English

    New analysis highlights importance of services to global trade

    New trade data measured in value-added terms shows that services – such as logistics, design, and transportation - are far more important to global commerce than they appear in traditional calculations of exports and imports.

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  • 29-May-2013

    English

    G20/ OECD Stocktaking Seminar on Global Value Chains

    A wide range of stakeholders examined the progress made on measuring trade in value added terms and to extract and clarify the emerging policy implications that can be employed to stimulate strong, balanced and job-rich growth.

  • 28-May-2013

    English

    Interconnected Economies - Benefiting from Global Value Chains

    Global Value Chains (GVCs) have exploded in the past decade and refer to the international dispersion of design, production, assembly, marketing and distribution of services, activities, and products. Different stages in the production process are increasingly located across different economies, and intermediate inputs like parts and components are produced in one country and then exported to other countries for further production and/or assembly into final products. The functional and spatial fragmentation that has occurred within GVCs has significantly reshaped the global economic landscape, thereby raising some new major policy challenges for OECD countries and emerging countries alike: trade policy, competitiveness, upgrading and innovation and the management of global systemic risk.

  • 24-May-2013

    English

    The value of trade

    The emergence of global value chains in manufacturing and services has revolutionised the way the world trades. It has also provided a valuable entry point for many developing economies into the global economy. Thanks to the combined efforts of the WTO and OECD, we now have a strong data-based understanding of these impacts, which will be vital to the design of effective trade policies.

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  • 22-May-2013

    English

    International Regulatory Co-operation: Case Studies, Vol. 3 - Transnational Private Regulation and Water Management

    The world is becoming increasingly global. This raises important challenges for regulatory processes which still largely emanate from domestic jurisdictions. In order to eliminate unnecessary regulatory divergences and to address the global challenges pertaining to systemic risks, the environment, and human health and safety, governments increasingly seek to better articulate regulations across borders and to ensure greater enforcement of rules. But, surprisingly, the gains that can be achieved through greater co-ordination of rules and their application across jurisdictions remain largely under-analysed.

    This volume complements the stocktaking report on International Regulatory Co-operation: Rules for a Global World by providing evidence on regulatory co-operation in the area of transboundary water management and through the fast development of transnational private regulation. 

  • 22-May-2013

    English

    Succeeding with Trade Reforms - The Role of Aid for Trade

    Succeeding with Trade Reforms: The Role of Aid for Trade highlights the potential of aid for trade to boost economic growth and reduce poverty, while discussing the various reasons why it may not be realised. In so doing, this book draws lessons for the design of aid-for-trade projects and programmes and for increasing their effectiveness. Building on this analysis, the book also quantifies the binding constraints to trade in developing countries and the importance of complementary and compatible policies (such as education, governance, business environment and macroeconomic stability) to maximise the impact of trade reforms on trade and economic growth.
  • 17-May-2013

    English

    Multilateralising Regionalism on Government Procurement

    The potential multilateralisation of government procurement commitments in regional trade agreements (RTAs) presents many issues and challenges. To what extent do RTAs go beyond the 2012 revised Agreement on Government Procurement (GPA), and how do they differ among trading partners? This report surveys 47 RTAs in force with government procurement provisions where an OECD member is a party.

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  • 15-May-2013

    English

    The Costs and Challenges of Implementing Trade Facilitation Measures - OECD Trade Policy Papers No. 157

    The costs to implement and maintain trade facilitation measures are not large and far smaller than the benefits gained from implementing these measures, according to this study. Moreover, an increasing amount of technical and financial assistance to implement these measures has been made available to developing countries over the last decade.

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  • 14-May-2013

    English

    Global Production Networks and Employment: A Developing Country Perspective

    International firms in developing economies tend to employ more workers and pay higher wages than firms dealing exclusively with the domestic market, according to this paper demonstrating the links between global value chains (GVCs)and labour market outcomes. Engagement in international activities provides greater opportunities for women to enter the formal employment market.

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