By Date


  • 1-July-2013

    English

    Aid for Trade and Value Chains in different sectors

    On the occasion of the 4th Global Review of Aid for Trade, the OECD and the WTO, in collaboration with GrowAfrica; the International Chamber of Commerce; the International Trade Center; the International Telecommunications Union; and the United Nations World Tourism Organization, conducted a survey among the private sector to identify the barriers that suppliers in developing countries face in connecting to value chains.

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  • 26-June-2013

    English

    The Construction of a New International Economic Order

    To better integrate their economies into Global Value Chains, governments need a fine-tuned understanding of their dynamics and policies, and we have made considerable progress on this front. For example, we have learned that success in international markets depends as much on the capacity to import high-quality inputs as on the capacity to export: intermediate inputs account for over 2/3 of the goods and 70% of the services we trade.

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  • 20-June-2013

    English

    Regional economic communities: integration to compete and pathway to inclusive globalisation

    Globalisation is largely about participation in global value chains. But making the most of globalisation and successfully integrating these value-chains requires that enterprises enhance their competitiveness and raise their productivity, said Angel Gurría

  • 20-June-2013

    English

    Business 20 Summit, Trade panel discussion

    We need to work more on the growing importance of services and accompanying policies to ensure inclusive growth. Efficient services regulations are a key for increasing productivity not just in the services sectors themselves, but also in the manufacturing sectors, said Angel Gurría.

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  • 19-June-2013

    English

    Aid for Trade and Development Results - A Management Framework

    This study presents a tool to help design logical frameworks for results-based management of aid for trade. What are donors and partner countries trying to achieve?  Three different levels of possible objectives (i.e. direct, intermediate and final) are explored. Trade is treated as an intermediate objective, serving as a transmission mechanism, with an increase in the value for trade as the final objective. Six case studies - Bangladesh, Colombia, Ghana, Rwanda, Solomon Islands and Viet Nam - provide a comprehensive overview of the challenges involved in introducing a tool for managing results in an agenda that covers a broad area of interventions that are aimed at building trade-related supply side capacities.

  • 17-June-2013

    English, PDF, 172kb

    Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP): Why does it matter?

    The Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) between the United States and the European Union, if successfully concluded, would be the most significant bilateral Free Trade Agreement (FTA) to date, covering approximately 50% of global output, almost 30% of world merchandise trade (including intra-EU trade, but excluding services trade) and 20% of global foreign direct investment.

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  • 11-June-2013

    English

    OECD to present new work on trade in Brussels on 18 June 2013

    New OECD trade data, first released in January 2013 and updated in late-May, traces the value added by each industry and each country as goods and services cross borders. The analysis offers a more complete picture of commercial relations between nations and a clearer interpretation of the changing face of global trade than more conventional indicators. Further information is available here.

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  • 11-June-2013

    English

    Aid for Trade in Action

    History has shown that openness to trade is a key ingredient for economic success and for improved living standards. But simply opening the economy to international trade is not enough. Developing countries – especially the least developed – require help in building their trade-related capacities in terms of information, policies, procedures, institutions and infrastructure, so as to compete effectively in the global economy. Aid for trade aims to help countries overcome the supply-side constraints that inhibit their ability to benefit from market access opportunities. The almost 300 case stories show clear results of how aid-for-trade programmes are helping developing countries to build human, institutional and infrastructure capacity to integrate into regional and global markets and to make good use of trade opportunities. Together, these stories are a rich and varied source of information on the results of aid for trade activities – an indication of the progress achieved by the Aid-for-Trade Initiative.

  • 5-June-2013

    English

    Putting Green Growth at the Heart of Development

    Green growth is vital to secure a brighter, more sustainable future for developing countries. Developing countries will pay a high price for failing to tackle local and global environmental threats because they are more dependent on natural resources and are more vulnerable to resources scarcity and natural disasters.

    This book presents evidence that green growth is the only way to sustain growth and development over the long-term. Green growth does not replace sustainable development, but is a means to achieve it. Green growth values natural assets, which are essential to the well-being and livelihoods of people in developing countries, and if policies are designed to respond to the needs of the poorest, green growth can contribute to poverty reduction and social equity.

    Building on experience with green growth policies in developing countries and extensive consultations with developing country stakeholders, this report provides a twin-track approach with agendas for national and international action. It responds to developing country concerns about the technical challenges arising from early efforts to “go green” and documents a wealth of examples from developing countries. Green growth objectives and policies will need to be mainstreamed into every government objective and most importantly, into national budgets. Green growth policies can use untapped opportunities to boost domestic fiscal revenues and attract quality investment for years to come. International co-operation is needed to help mitigate the short-term costs that may be associated with pursuing green growth. International flows of money, trade and technology know-how is vital to encourage pursuit of green growth in developing countries.

  • 29-May-2013

    English

    New analysis highlights importance of services to global trade

    New trade data measured in value-added terms shows that services – such as logistics, design, and transportation - are far more important to global commerce than they appear in traditional calculations of exports and imports.

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