Latest Documents


  • 28-September-2011

    English

    Smart Rules for Fair Trade - 50 years of Export Credits

    On the 50th anniversary of the OECD, we examine the unique work the organisation performs in regulating and rationalising governments’ use of export credits in support of exports, jobs, economic growth and national interests more broadly. This work is part of a global post war effort to emphasise multilateral co operation and sound economic policies to promote co operation, efficiency and prosperity rather than destructive competition, controversy and conflict.

    OECD export credits work is one of the basic building blocks of the ever growing structure of global trade agreements that aim to maintain open and efficient markets. The objective is to eliminate subsidies and unfair practices in the economic competition that forms the foundation of a healthy and dynamic global economy. The elimination of official financing subsidies in global trade is only a part of the broader trade policy agenda, but it is a vital part, and has been delegated to the OECD by the WTO. Since financing is the life blood of trade flows, specialised OECD housed work allows trade to flow efficiently for aircraft and other capital goods while other trade policy work and litigation continue at the WTO.

    The export credits work at the OECD is described in this collection of essays. However it is about much more than the series of agreements described herein. It is more fundamentally about the governments and their people - policy makers and experts - who gather at the OECD to build collectively a system of export credits disciplines that is fair, transparent, adaptable and effective. It is therefore as much about people and ideas as anything else. The export credit secretariat pictured above represents only the latest in a long line of OECD staff committed to facilitate and advise this work.

    The OECD’s motto on its 50th anniversary is “Better Policies for Better Lives.” This reminds us that in the end, it is policies that are at the centre of human well being. And export credits work is about promoting these better policies by developing “smart rules” that open markets and maintain a level playing field and by bringing people and governments together to this end.

  • 28-September-2011

    English

    Smart Rules for Fair Trade: 50 Years of Export Credits (Sept. 2011)

    OECD export credits work is one of the basic building blocks of the ever growing structure of global trade agreements that aim to maintain open and efficient markets.

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  • 21-September-2011

    English

    Agriculture: Support to agriculture at historic lows, OECD says

    Government support to agriculture in OECD countries fell to 18% of total farm receipts in 2010, a record low linked to high commodity prices, but has been rising in large emerging economies, according to a new OECD report.

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  • 21-September-2011

    English

    Evaluation of Agricultural Policy Reforms in Turkey

    Turkey is an important producer and exporter of agricultural commodities on world markets and is estimated to be the world’s 7th-largest agricultural producer. Although the economic importance of agricultural sector relative to the industrial and service sectors has been declining, agriculture still remains a key part of Turkey’s society, employing about one quarter of the workforce and generating most of income and employment in rural areas.

    Agricultural policies in Turkey have evolved significantly over time and the new Agricultural Law agreed in 2006 aims to align Turkey’s agricultural policies with those of the European Union. The main purpose of the study is to evaluate recent policy developments in the context of a broader review of policy developments since the implementation of the Agricultural Reform Implementation Project (ARIP) in 2001. This study also discusses several emerging issues and challenges for Turkish agricultural policies, and offers key policy recommendations.

  • 21-September-2011

    English

    Agricultural Policy Monitoring and Evaluation 2011: OECD Countries and Emerging Economies

    After an increase in 2009, producer support in the OECD area declined in 2010, confirming the downward trend in support to farmers. The trend in emerging economies shows some increase in the level of support, although it stays well below the OECD average.

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  • 20-September-2011

    English

    Evaluation of Agricultural Policy Reforms in Turkey

    Turkey could boost its competitiveness in agriculture by renewing efforts to decouple farm support from production while continuing with institutional reforms, according to this report. These policy steps will also prepare Turkey for possible future European Union membership.

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  • 12-September-2011

    English

    Trade Facilitation Indicators: The Impact on Trade Costs

    Advance rulings, formalities and procedures, information availability and inter-agency cooperation are the policy areas with the greatest impact on trade volumes and trade costs, according to OECD trade facilitation indicators studied in this report.

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  • 29-August-2011

    English

    The Trade Effects of Phasing Out Fossil-Fuel Consumption Subsidies

    A co-ordinated multilateral removal of fossil-fuel consumption subsidies over the 2013-2020 period would increase global trade volumes by 0.1% by 2020, according to this report.

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  • 16-August-2011

    English

    Agricultural Progress and Poverty Reduction: Synthesis Report

    Is agriculture more important than other sources of earned income in reducing poverty? Which government policy actions have contributed most? This study compares socio-economic characteristics of twenty-five countries that have made exceptional progress in reducing poverty.

  • 11-August-2011

    English

    Trade in Tasks

    Trade in tasks represents the latest turn in a virtuous cycle of deepening specialisation of labour, expansion of the market and productivity growth. This paper analyses the task content of goods and services and sheds light on structural changes that take place following trade liberalisation.

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