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  • 18-February-2021

    English

    Business dynamism during the COVID-19 pandemic: Which policies for an inclusive recovery?

    This note looks at how the COVID-19 pandemic has affected business dynamism, how support to businesses has affected bankruptcy rates, and what countries can do to support a strong and resilient recovery.

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  • 11-February-2021

    English

    Global Value Chains (GVCs)

    The emergence of GVCs challenges our conventional wisdom on how we look at economic globalisation and in particular the policies that we develop around it. The OECD is preparing a broad range of work to help policy makers understand the effects of GVCs on a number of policy domains.

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  • 1-February-2021

    English, PDF, 1,735kb

    Peer review of the Turkish shipbuilding industry

    In 2019, Turkey was the 11th largest global shipbuilding economy in terms of seagoing vessel completions. Turkey is also a significant global actor in ship repair, ship maintenance and ship recycling.

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  • 22-January-2021

    English

    Liquidity shortfalls during the COVID-19 outbreak: Assessment and policy responses

    The paper investigates the financial vulnerability of non-financial firms during the Coronavirus (COVID-19) epidemic crisis. In particular, it evaluates the extent to which firms may run into a liquidity crisis following the COVID-19 outbreak and the impact of stylised policy measures to reduce the risks and depth of such crisis. The analysis relies on three ingredients: a simple accounting model, a large dataset reporting firms’ balance sheets for 14 countries and granular data on the magnitude of the shock measuring the impact of confinement measures on economic activity (notably depending on the capacity of each sector to operate by teleworking). Results suggest that, without any policy intervention, up to 38% of firms would face liquidity shortfalls after 10 months since the implementation of confinement measures. Comparing the impact of different policies (tax deferral, debt moratorium and support to wage payments), the analysis shows that government support to relieve wage bills is the most effective tool to reduce liquidity shortages, followed by debt moratorium policies. Finally, the paper zooms into labour market policies and compares the costefficiency of short-term work and wage subsidies schemes, highlighting how their relative efficiency depends on their design.
  • 21-January-2021

    English, PDF, 852kb

    Declining business dynamism: Cross-country evidence, drivers and the role of policy - policy note

    A recent OECD study analyses the trends in business dynamism using harmonised data across 18 countries and 22 industries over the period 2000-15. It shows that entry rates and job reallocation rates experienced a pervasive slowdown over this period, declining on average by three and five percentage points, respectively.

  • 18-January-2021

    English

    Scale, market power and competition in a digital world - Is bigger better?

    This report assesses the impact of digitalisation on competition by examining the evolution of mark-ups and multifactor productivity (MFP) across firms of different sizes. It finds that size is positively related to mark-ups and that this relationship has strengthened over time. This trend has been accompanied by an increase in the relative productivity advantage of larger firms and both changes are more pronounced in digital-intensive sectors, suggesting that digitalisation may be an underlying driver. Policy makers may need to consider appropriate responses if digital technologies affect larger and smaller firms in a heterogeneous manner.
  • 22-December-2020

    English, PDF, 512kb

    Laggard firms and technology diffusion - policy note

    A recent OECD study investigates the characteristics of the least productive firms and reveals their potential for productivity growth.

  • 15-December-2020

    English

    Cross border investment by state-owned enterprises

    The paper analyses data on state-owned enterprises as cross-border investors and takes a first step towards analysing their investment characteristics since 2000. It shows that the number of cross-border investments by state-owned enterprises was overall small, with most originating from the People’s Republic of China (hereafter 'China'), and suggests that the investment preferences of state-owned enterprises may fuel excess capacity in the steel sector. This is because state-owned enterprises display a preference for building new capacity over acquiring existing capacity when investing abroad, and a preference for investment destinations with volatile demand growth. Data also suggest that state-owned enterprises might be more likely to undertake domestic capacity closures after a cross-border investment, which is likely influenced by recent policies introduced to curb excess capacity in China. Conversely, the data offer insufficient evidence regarding the link between cross-border investment by state-owned enterprises and capacity outcomes in target jurisdictions.
  • 11-December-2020

    English

    Steel Market Developments

    These reports provide an overview of recent supply and demand developments and, when available, forecasts from publicly available sources.

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  • 23-November-2020

    English

    CO2 emissions embodied in international trade and domestic final demand - Methodology and results using the OECD Inter-Country Input-Output Database

    This paper describes the sources and methods used to estimate carbon emissions embodied in final demand and international gross trade for 65 economies over the period 2005-2015. Earlier OECD analyses of carbon footprints, accounting for global production networks, helped raise awareness of divergences between territorial and resident principles, and between production-based and consumption-based carbon emissions. Understanding the differences in these measures is important for governments to better understand and address greenhouse gas mitigation options. Thus, a new refined methodology was applied to allocate territorial emissions to production-based emissions (industries and households) using OECD Inter-Country Input-Output tables and International Energy Agency (IEA) CO2 emissions from fuel combustion statistics. In particular, this methodology introduces: 1) explicit distinctions between territorial and resident principles, economic output and final demand-based emissions and emissions embodied in gross imports and exports; 2) estimates by major fuel combustion sources; and 3) fuel purchases by non-resident industries and households.
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