Statistics Directorate

Focus

  • Statistical Insights: What does household debt say about financial resilience?

    Household debt levels increased rapidly in many economies in the run-up to the 2007-2008 financial crisis, fuelled in part by easy credit and rising property prices. Ratios of debt to annual income – used by lenders to determine households’ repayment capacity – then reached record highs across OECD countries. These debt levels have since continued to rise in most OECD countries...

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  • Households' economic well-being: the OECD dashboard

    The OECD has developed a dashboard of household statistics that allows you to see how households are faring in OECD countries. We have also developed a series of country specific stories that provide a more detailed analysis of households; this quarter: Spotlight on Irish households

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  • OECD Better Life Initiative

    The OECD Better Life Initiative brings together several strands of the OECD’s work on measuring well-being and progress, including the How’s Life? report and its research agenda, and the Better Life Index.

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What's new

G20 GDP growth accelerates to 0.9% in second quarter of 2017

Quarterly GDP in volume terms for the G20 
Percentage change on the previous quarter, s.a.

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14/09/2017 - Growth of real Gross Domestic Product (GDP) in the G20 area accelerated to 0.9% in the second quarter of 2017, compared with 0.8% in the previous quarter, according to provisional estimates.  

Growth picked up strongly in Turkey, to 2.1% (as compared with 1.3% in the first quarter of 2017), the highest quarterly growth among G20 economies. Real GDP also increased significantly in China (by 1.7%, compared with 1.3% in the previous quarter), South Africa (by 0.6%, following a contraction of 0.1%) and in Australia and the United States (by 0.8%, compared with 0.3% in the previous quarter). Growth also picked up, although to a lesser extent, in India (to 1.4%, from 1.3%), Canada (to 1.1%, from 0.9%), Japan (to 0.6%, from 0.3%), and the United Kingdom (to 0.3%, from 0.2%).  

            

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