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  • 21-May-2015

    English, PDF, 1,021kb

  • 6-May-2015

    English, PDF, 405kb

    Focus on Minimum wages after the crisis: Making them pay (PDF, 12-pages)

    Three out of four OECD countries use minimum wages, and supporting low-wage earners is widely seen as important for promoting inclusive growth. This policy brief considers three aspects that are central for a balanced assessment of policy choices: The cost of employing minimum-wage workers, their take-home pay, and the number of workers affected.

  • 14-April-2015

    English

    OECD tax burdens on wages rising without tax rate increases

    Taxes on wages have risen by about 1 percentage point for the average worker in OECD countries between 2010 and 2014 even though the majority of governments did not increase statutory income tax rates, according to a new OECD report.

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  • 4-March-2015

    English

    NEET Youth in the Aftermath of the Crisis (OECD Social, Employment and Migration Working papers, N°164)

    This paper presents an overview of the situation of youth in OECD countries since the financial crisis, describing the characteristics and living conditions of young NEETs. It provides data on income-support policies for young people, and summarises available evidence on the impact of interventions that aim at improving the social, education and employment situation of the most disadvantaged youth.

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  • 9-December-2014

    English

    Inequality hurts economic growth, finds OECD research

    Reducing income inequality would boost economic growth, according to new OECD analysis. This work finds that countries with lower income inequality grow faster than those with higher inequality.

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  • 9-December-2014

    English, PDF, 634kb

    Focus on Inequality and Growth

    Widespread increases in income inequality have raised concerns about their potential impact on our societies and economies. New OECD research shows that when income inequality rises, economic growth falls. One reason is that poorer members of society are less able to invest in their education. Tackling inequality can make our societies fairer and our economies stronger.

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  • 31-October-2014

    English

    Society at a Glance: Asia/Pacific 2014

    This is the third edition of Society at a Glance Asia/Pacific, a regularly updated OECD overview of social indicators, which addresses the growing demand for quantitative evidence on social well-being and its trends. This report starts with an introductory chapter providing a guide to help readers understanding the OECD Social Indicator framework. Chapters 2 and three are special thematic chapters to address two increasingly topical issues in the social debate: Gender Equality in Education, Employment and Entrepreneurship and Social Protection Expenditure.

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  • 1-August-2014

    English

    Tax and Benefit Systems: OECD Indicators

    The project "Benefits and Wages" addresses the complicated interactions of tax and benefit systems for different family types and labour market situations and their impact on household incomes and financial work incentives.

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  • 21-July-2014

    English

    Changes in Family Policies and Outcomes: Is there Convergence? (OECD Social, Employment and Migration Working Papers No. 157)

    This paper presents new information on trends in family and child outcomes and policies over the past decades, in order to assess whether there has been any convergence over time across OECD and EU countries. Important drivers of population structure such as life expectancy and fertility rates are becoming more similar across countries as are marriage and divorce rates.

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  • 16-May-2014

    English

    Trends in Top Incomes and their Taxation in OECD Countries (OECD Social, Employment and Migration Working Papers No. 159)

    The shares of top income recipients in total pre-tax income have increased in OECD countries in the past three decades, particularly in most of the English-speaking countries but also in some Nordic (from low levels) and Southern European countries. Today, the richest one percent receives between 7% of all pre-tax income in Denmark and the Netherlands up to almost 20% in the United States.

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