Reports


  • 21-November-2016

    English

    The gig economy will not abolish working 9 to 5

    We have always had plumbers, electricians, and lawyers who do temporary work, and are not paid by a household when they are idle. However, do new apps such as Uber or Deliveroo mean the end of the 9 to 5 job, and do these platforms need to be regulated?

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  • 17-November-2016

    English

    Donor support to southern women’s rights organisations: OECD findings

    The case for investing in women’s rights organisations is firmly established. This report seeks to shed light on how this can best be done. It reviews how DAC donors are partnering with southern women’s rights organisations and identifies promising approaches, models and mechanisms.

  • 27-October-2016

    English

    Labour mobility in the European Union: a need for more recognition of foreign qualifications

    Labour market mobility in the European Union is increasing, but it remains too low to provide sufficient adjustment in the face of diverging labour market developments.

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  • 14-October-2016

    English

    OECD-FAO Guidance for Responsible Agricultural Supply Chains

    OECD and FAO have developed this Guidance to help enterprises observe standards of responsible business conduct and undertake due diligence along agricultural supply chains in order to ensure that their operations contribute to sustainable development. The Guidance comprises:
    • A model enterprise policy outlining the standards that enterprises should observe to build responsible agricultural supply chains;
    • A framework for risk-based due diligence describing the five steps that enterprises should follow to identify, assess, mitigate and account for how they address the adverse impacts of their activities;
    • A description of the major risks faced by enterprises and the measures to mitigate these risks;
    • Guidance for engaging with indigenous peoples.

  • 13-October-2016

    English

    Making Cities Work for All - Data and Actions for Inclusive Growth

    Cities are places where opportunities for prosperity coexist with stark inequalities between the richest and the poorest. Cities produce and attract highly educated workers and innovative employers. It is usually easier in cities than in other parts of the country for individuals to climb up the income, education or jobs ladder. But cities, especially the largest ones, also concentrate inequalities, both in income and in other well-being aspects,  that remain remarkably high in many OECD economies. Access to opportunities seems stalled for many low-income urban residents, who often live in distressed neighbourhoods.  This report provides ground-breaking, internationally comparable data on economic growth, inequalities and well-being at the city level in OECD countries. It provides empirical evidence on how cities are diverging from, or converging with, other parts of the country, and of the extent of inequality within cities. Finally, it proposes a framework for action, to help national and local governments reorient policies towards more inclusive growth in cities – a new approach to growth that ensures that no part of society is left behind.

  • 12-October-2016

    English

    Mind the gaps: boost early childcare education and care in Costa Rica

    Costa Rican well-being indicators are comparable or even above the OECD average in several dimensions (OECD, 2016a). Nevertheless, gaps with OECD countries are large in two dimensions: labour market participation and education.

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  • 5-October-2016

    English

    Society at a Glance 2016 - OECD Social Indicators

    This is the eighth edition of Society at a Glance, the biennial OECD overview of social indicators. This report addresses the growing demand for quantitative evidence on social well-being and its trends. It updates some indicators included in the previous editions published since 2001 and introduces several new ones, with 25 indicators in total. It includes data for the 35 OECD member countries and where available data for key partners (Brazil, China, India, Indonesia, Russia and South Africa); other G20 countries (Argentina and Saudi Arabia) are also included. The report features a special chapter on the NEET challenge and what can be done for jobless and disengaged youth. It also provides a guide to help readers in understanding the structure of OECD social indicators. All indicators are available as a web book and an e-book on OECD iLibrary.
     

  • 5-October-2016

    English

    Weaving Together Policies for Social Inclusion in Ireland

    Ireland has made considerable progress in rebounding from the crisis, but, like other OECD countries, continues to grapple with how to address lingering socio-economic impacts and ensure inclusive growth growing forward. Multi-faceted interventions, targeting disadvantaged populations and the places they live, can lead to more effective and inclusive policies. Ignoring the relationship between people and place will, in contrast, lead to further entrenched disadvantage. This report looks at some of the ways in which Ireland can build on an already comprehensive series of reforms to better weave together current policies and practices.

  • 23-September-2016

    English

    Does decentralisation foster regional GDP convergence?

    The growth pattern of OECD countries and their sub-national entities is puzzling. Between-country differences in GDP per capita are declining, yet the differences across jurisdictions within those countries tend to rise.

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  • 12-September-2016

    English

    Investing in Youth: Australia

    The present report on Australia is part of the series on "Investing in Youth", which builds on the expertise of the OECD on youth employment, social support and skills. This series covers both OECD countries and countries in the process of accession to the OECD, as well as some emerging economies. The report provides a detailed diagnosis of youth policies in the area of education, training, social and employment policies. Its main focus is on disengaged or at-risk of disengaged youth.

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