Articles


  • 12-July-2013

    English, PDF, 1,012kb

    Balancing Economic Efficiency and Social Equity, as published by the Japan Economic Foundation

    Why Should We Care about High & Growing Inequality? How Unequal Are OECD Societies? Has Gap between Rich & Poor Widened? Possible Culprits in Growing Divide - What OECD Evidence Tells Us about Main Culprits - Importance of Tax/Benefit Systems - What Was the Impact of the Recent Great Recession? What Can Policies Do to Reduce Too-high Inequality?

    Related Documents
  • 5-July-2013

    English

    Emerging unrest

    Street protests are back on the global political scene. Do these movements reflect a frustrated middle class who feel the chill of the global economic crisis? Or are there more profound shifts at play?

    Related Documents
  • 21-May-2013

    English

    Meeting our challenges

    How can we increase employment and strengthen social cohesion? The prime minister of Norway argues that we need urgent action to ensure that an entire generation of young people remains connected to the labour market. We must also address the issue of income distribution to protect the vulnerable and guarantee greater equality of opportunity across our societies.

    Related Documents
  • 15-May-2013

    English

    Russia’s human capital challenge

    To pursue economic growth, Russia must develop its human capital, which requires structural reforms in education, healthcare and pensions. These, in turn, must respond to major trends in service provision, including the increasing role of individual choice, the need to deliver lifelong learning and healthcare, and the risk that Russians will increasingly buy services abroad, rather than work to develop their own national systems.

    Related Documents
  • 14-May-2013

    English

    It’s all about people: Jobs, equality and trust

    More than five years into an economic crisis which has taken on several names–from subprime crisis and financial crisis to great recession–no term accurately depicts the fundamental result of this economic turbulence: people facing hardship.

    Related Documents
  • 30-April-2013

    English

    Growth is not enough

    Brazil’s labour leaders have long argued against pursuing economic growth for its own sake. What matters most, they believe, is not the size of the economic pie but how it’s carved up. In recent years, calls for social justice have increasingly informed policy in Brazil, bringing about a veritable “revolution” in the economy.

    Related Documents
  • 24-April-2013

    English

    Asia’s Challenges

    The forces driving Asia’s rapid growth–new technology, globalisation, and market-oriented reform–are also fuelling rising inequality. Some income divergence is inevitable in times of fast economic development, but that shouldn’t make for complacency, especially in the face of rising inequality in people’s opportunities to develop their human capital and income-earning capacity.

    Related Documents
  • 9-April-2013

    English

    The new performance frontier - Business Brief

    By helping emphasise the importance of a “better life” as a key component of societal progress, the OECD has made considerable efforts in recent years to help promote a school of thought that places people’s well-being at the heart of economic growth.

    Related Documents
  • 5-March-2013

    English

    Growing more equal?

    Equality between the sexes has come a long way in the past 50 years or so, and in some areas (life expectancy, education) women are now ahead of men in many countries. So why do we still need an international women’s day?

    Related Documents
  • 28-February-2013

    English

    Aid in Support of Gender Equality in Fragile and Conflict-affected States - Chapter 4

    The present study is a contribution to mark the 10th anniversary of the adoption of UNSCR 1325 (in 2010), and provides an overview of DAC members' funding targeted to gender equality in fragile and conflict-affected states.

    Related Documents
    Also AvailableEgalement disponible(s)
  • << < 1 | 2 | 3 > >>