Articles


  • 29-May-2015

    English

    Why quotas work for gender equality

    Gender inequality is one of the most primitive and oldest forms of inequality. Sadly, it is still very much a reality in most parts of the world. In many countries women do not have equal access to education, healthcare, safety, work or political decision-making.

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  • 29-May-2015

    English

    Korea's work-life balance policies for sustainable growth

    Of the abundant resources given to mankind, what is the most underused resource of our time? Without a doubt, women!

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  • 29-May-2015

    English

    Middle-class economics

    In 2014, the US economy added more jobs than in any year since the 1990s. In fact, this longest streak of job growth on record has persisted into 2015. Inflation-adjusted wages are up by 1.4% annually over the last two years, more than twice the pace of the last recovery. But this is still not enough to make up for decades of subpar gains for middle-class families–a challenge shared by many other OECD economies.

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  • 27-May-2015

    English

    Business brief: Who cares for the caregivers

    Consistent careers are a hallmark of a successful retirement. However, too often, workers are called away from employment to care for loved ones, both young and old. Without adequate government or employer protections, workers risk losing valuable years of prime income earning and retirement contribution potential, while being paid nothing to take care of sick or disabled family.

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  • 5-May-2015

    English

    Senescence in the City - OECD Insights blog

    Blog: Anecdotal evidence suggests there are loads of grumpy old men and women around. A new, evidence-based report from the OECD offers some clues as to why this should be.

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  • 4-May-2015

    English

    More and better jobs for an inclusive recovery

    The world is still repairing the damage done to employment prospects and social equality by the crisis. Governments are trying to create not just more jobs, but better jobs. A new OECD framework helps them to define what job quality means and to measure whether their policies are succeeding.

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  • 13-November-2014

    English

    What an inclusive recovery needs is more, and better, jobs

    Time progresses inexorably. Six years have already elapsed since the onset of the global financial crisis, and employment in many countries is still far below its pre-2008 levels. Even for people who still have jobs, working conditions have deteriorated. Until recently, we were decrying a jobless recovery, but now the data suggest that growth itself may be fading in several countries.

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  • 31-March-2014

    English

    Japan: Closing the gender gap can boost the economy

    Reconciling work and family commitments is a challenge in every country, but particularly for Japanese men and women. Much more so than in most other OECD countries, men and women have to choose between babies and bosses: men choose bosses, women less so, but on the whole there are very few babies and there is too little female employment. These shortcomings are increasingly coming to the fore and will have to be addressed.

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  • 12-March-2014

    English

    Inequality

    Inequality is a multi-dimensional challenge, it goes beyond income and it affects the well-being of our people. Evidence now tells us that the levels of inequality are becoming an impediment for progress, and that action is needed on many fronts. Tackling inequalities continues to be our core business for economic reasons, for fair societies with equal opportunities, and not least for the well-being of our citizens.

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  • 4-March-2014

    English, PDF, 1,183kb

    Financing the unfinished business of gender equality and women’s rights: priorities for the post-2015 framework - Short brief

    This brief analyses investments by OECD Development Assistance Committee (DAC) donors in six policy areas that are priorities for the post-2015 agenda because of their catalytic impact on achieving gender equality and women’s rights: girls’ education; sexual and reproductive health and rights; women’s economic empowerment; women, peace and security; women’s participation and leadership; and, violence against women and girls.

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