Publications & Documents


  • 18-April-2018

    English

    Working Together for Local Integration of Migrants and Refugees in Amsterdam

    In Amsterdam, the Netherlands, 51.66% of the population was born outside of the country or has at least one parent born abroad. Amsterdam is proud of its cultural and ethnical diversity and actively works to attract international students and high-skilled migrants. Like many European cities, Amsterdam experienced a peak in refugees and asylum seekers arrivals in 2015 and in response has implemented a holistic integration model, which starts at the moment migrants arrive and supports them for their first three years. Migrants are not considered as a minority group with different needs, but rather as one group among others with specific characteristics (such as women, the elderly, the disabled, LGBT) whose outcomes are monitored to identify potential structural gaps in their access to opportunities and services. This work compiles data and qualitative evidence on how local actions for integration, across a number of sectors, are being designed and implemented by the City of Amsterdam and its partners within a multi-level governance framework.
  • 18-April-2018

    English

    Housing Dynamics in Korea - Building Inclusive and Smart Cities

    Housing in Korea has been part of the government policy development agenda for the past three decades contributing to reducing the historical housing shortage and improving the quality of dwellings. Despite its achievements, Korea now faces a housing affordability challenge as prices are too high for several social groups (i.e. newly wedded), owner occupancy levels are decreasing, and social housing is struggling to meet demand. Korea has a complex social housing system largely focused on low-income households, who still suffer from housing poverty in terms of housing stability, affordability and quality.
     
    A holistic view on housing policy to promote a more inclusive society and sustainable economic growth is needed. To overcome the current housing challenge requires expanding the network of public housing providers by including the private and community sectors that could alleviate the government’s financial burden. Korea is linking housing and urban regeneration strategies to respond to the complex challenges of social inclusion, job creation, housing and economic revitalisation. Korea has been at the forefront of smart city development for more than a decade, which has brought benefits to Korean cities such as integrated transport systems, and it is now committed to applying the concept as a vehicle for inclusive growth.
  • 17-April-2018

    English

    Youth well-being policy review of Moldova: A 60 seconds guide

    This brochure explains in 60 seconds the main findings of the Review of Youth well-being and Policies in Moldova. This study provides an in-depth analysis of the situation of young people in terms of social inclusion and well-being. Concrete public policy recommendations are proposed to maximize the impact of government action in favor of youth.

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  • 17-April-2018

    English, PDF, 3,166kb

    Youth inclusion photo contest - photobook

    On the occasion of the International Youth Day 2017, the EU-OECD Youth Inclusion project launched the Photo Contest: Take a shot at your future, calling for young people aged 18-30 to submit photos representing the future of work and/or their owns aspirations.

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  • 5-April-2018

    English

    Investing in Youth: Norway

    The present report on Norway is part of the series on 'Investing in Youth' which builds on the expertise of the OECD on youth employment, social support and skills. This series covers both OECD countries and countries in the process of accession to the OECD, as well as some emerging economies. The report provides a detailed diagnosis of youth policies in the areas of education, training, social and employment policies. Its main focus is on young people who are not in employment, education or training (the 'NEETs').Earlier reviews in the same series have looked at youth policies in Brazil (2014), Latvia and Tunisia (2015), Australia, Lithuania and Sweden (2016), Japan (2017).
  • 4-April-2018

    English

    Agro-food economy holds key to a brighter future for young people in developing countries, says new OECD Development Centre study

    Today's world youth population -aged 10 to 24- is 1.8 billion people strong and represents the largest cohort ever transitioning to adulthood. Eighty-eight per cent of them live in developing countries. With the right policies in place, they can be influential actors of economic and social progress.

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  • 3-April-2018

    English, PDF, 2,483kb

    Better Policies for Better Youth Livelihoods: A guidance note for development practitioners

    This guide provides an overview of key challenges faced by youth in the countries studied and that the project considered being priority issue to be addressed urgently by governments and the development community.

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  • 28-March-2018

    English

    Togo: Launch of the Youth Well-being Policy Review of Togo, 14 March 2018, Lomé

    The OECD Development Centre, together with the Ministry of Grassroots Development, Crafts, Youth, and Youth Employment (MDBAJEJ) and the Delegation of the European Union to Togo organised an event in Lomé on 14 March 2018 to present the key findings and recommendations of the Youth Well-being Policy Review of Togo and to develop a roadmap identifying the key actions needed to implement the recommendations of the study.

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  • 21-March-2018

    English

    Implementing the OECD Principles on Water Governance - Indicator Framework and Evolving Practices

    Water and its improved governance are critical for economic growth, social inclusiveness and environmental sustainability. Three years after the adoption of the OECD Water Governance Principles, this report takes stock of their use and dissemination. It provides a water governance indicator framework and a set of evolving practices for bench-learning, building on lessons learned from different countries and contexts.
     
    Based on an extensive bottom up and multi-stakeholder process within the OECD Water Governance Initiative (WGI), these tools are conceived of as voluntary methodologies to be carried out at country, region, basin and/or city levels to improve water policies. The indicator framework is composed of a traffic light system based on 36 input and process indicators and a checklist with questions on a number of more specific governance conditions. The framework concludes with an action plan to help prioritise steps towards better design and implementation of water policies.
  • 14-March-2018

    English, PDF, 4,533kb

    Empowering women in the digital age: Where do we stand?

    New digital tools are empowering, and can serve to support a new source of inclusive global economic growth. Now is the time to take use the digital transformation to ensure it represents a leapfrog opportunity for women and a chance to build a more inclusive digital world. This brochure represents a preliminary effort by the OECD, working with the G20, to broaden the evidence base.

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