Publications & Documents


  • 22-December-2011

    English

    The Future of Families to 2030

    Since the 1960s the family in the OECD area has undergone significant transformation. In many countries, the extended family has all but disappeared, and the traditional two-parent family has become much less widespread as divorce rates, re-marriages, cohabitation, single parenthood and same-sex partnerships have all increased.  With rising migration, cultures and values have become more diverse, with some ethnic minorities evolving as parallel family cultures while others intermingle with mainstream cultures through mixed-race marriages. Families have seen more mothers take up work in the labour market, their adolescents spend longer and longer in education and training, and the elderly members of the family live longer and, increasingly, alone.  The repercussions of these changes on housing, pensions, health and long-term care, on labour markets, education and public finances, have been remarkable. Recent demographic projections perfromed by many OECD countries suggest that the next 20 years are likely to see a continuation and even acceleration of changes in household and family structures.  In particular, the numbers and shares of single-adult and single-parent households are expected to increase significantly, as is the number of couples without children.

    This report explores likely future changes in family and household structures in OECD countries; identifies what appear to be the main forces shaping the family landscape between now and 2030; discusses the longer-term challenges for policy arising from those expected changes; and on the basis of the three subsequent thematic chapters, suggests policy options for managing the challenges on a sustainable basis.  

  • 21-December-2011

    English

    What future for the family?

    This blogpost offers some projections for the future of families and calls for strengthening the links among family-relevant aspects of different policy domains, such as care for children and the elderly, labour market, education, technology and housing.

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  • 20-December-2011

    English

    Literacy for Life - Further Results from the Adult Literacy and Life Skills Survey

    Literacy for Life is the second report from the Adult Literacy and Life Skills Survey. It presents additional results on the nature and magnitude of the literacy gaps faced by OECD countries and how these gaps have evolved over the medium term.

    It offers new insights into the factors that influence the formation of adult skills in various settings – at home and at work – for the eleven countries participating in the first and last round of data collection between 2003 and 2008. The study offers comparative evidence on the impact of various factors on the supply of skill. The study offers a special focus on numeracy skills and problem solving skills. It explores the relationships between numeracy and key socio-demographic factors as well as labour market outcomes and earnings.

    It highlights the importance of problem solving skills by defining this foundational skill and by exploring its determinants as well as its relative role in influencing important labour market outcomes.

    The report offers also an analysis of performance across multiple skill domains. It investigates the skill profiles of various population groups defined in terms of the demographic and socioeconomic characteristics of those who score at levels deemed to be low in one or more skill domains and explores the resulting consequences.

    The report concludes by investigating the issue of skill mismatch in the labour market and its relationship to adult learning. The extent and distribution of mismatch between the day-to-day literacy related requirements of workers and the literacy skills they have obtained is an important issue that is being explored in this study.

  • 19-December-2011

    English

    Employment Protection Legislation and Plant-Level Productivity in India

    Using plant-level data from the Annual Survey of Industries for the fiscal years 1998-99 through 2007-08, this study provides plant-level cross-state/time-series evidence of the impact of employment protection legislation on total factor productivity¨and labour productivity in India.

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  • 15-December-2011

    English

    Society at a Glance - Asia/Pacific Edition 2011

    Society at a Glance – Asia/Pacific Edition 2011 offers a concise quantitative overview of social trends and policies across Asia/Pacific countries and economies.

  • 14-December-2011

    English

    Improving educational outcomes in Slovenia

    Overall, the education system fares well by international comparison. Slovenia has one of the highest shares of the population aged 25 to 64 to have completed at least upper secondary education, and ranks high in international educational achievement tests.

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  • 12-December-2011

    English

    Sickness, Disability, Mental health and Work - Selection of tables and charts

    Prevalence of disability and mental health disorders, share of disability benefit recipients, employment and unemployment rates of persons with a disability, etc.

  • 12-December-2011

    Russian

    ОЭСР: экономика России восстанавливается, но процесс модернизации необходимо ускорить

    По мнению ОЭСР Российской Федерации, необходимо стимулировать процесс модернизации экономики для обеспечения долгосрочного развития страны и решения проблем, связанных с неравномерным распределением доходов.

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  • 12-December-2011

    English

    The Russian economy is recovering, but faster modernisation needed, OECD says

    The Russian Federation must further modernise its economy to meet long-term development and income inequality challenges, according to the OECD. A combination of sound macroeconomic management, improved business climate, effective social policies and greater energy efficiency is required.

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  • 7-December-2011

    English

    Structural reforms to reduce unemployment and restore competitiveness in Ireland

    After a recession of historic proportions, an export-led recovery is gaining traction in Ireland. The pace of recovery, however, varies sharply across sectors.

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