Publications & Documents


  • 6-December-2016

    English

    Back to Work: United States - Improving the Re-employment Prospects of Displaced Workers

    Job displacement (involuntary job loss due to firm closure or downsizing) affects many workers over their lifetime. Displaced workers may face long periods of unemployment and, even when they find new jobs, tend to be paid less and have fewer benefits than in their prior jobs. Helping them get back into good jobs quickly should be a key goal of labour market policy. This report is part of a series of nine reports looking at how this challenge is being tackled in a number of OECD countries. It shows that the United States has a relatively high rate of job displacement and that only one in two affected workers find a new job within one year. Older displaced workers and those with a low level of education fare worst. Contrary to most other OECD countries, displaced workers have long been a target group for policy intervention, and a number of system features, like rapid response services, are promising. But the success of US policies is limited because overall funding for the workforce development system is insufficient and because only trade-related job displacement comes with generous entitlement for training and better benefits.

  • 5-December-2016

    English, PDF, 600kb

    Agenda - Seventh Meeting of the PD-NR

    The OECD Policy Dialogue on Natural Resource-based Development will have a two-day meeting, in order to bring together representatives of governments, extractive industries, civil society and think tanks and will afford opportunities to advance the work under the different Streams of Work, according to the roadmap agreed upon at the Sixth Meeting of the Policy Dialogue on 22-23 June 2016.

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  • 5-December-2016

    English

    Seventh Meeting of the PD-NR - 30 November-1 December 2016

    The OECD Policy Dialogue on Natural Resource-based Development will have a two-day meeting, in order to bring together representatives of governments, extractive industries, civil society and think tanks and will afford opportunities to advance the work under the different Streams of Work, according to the roadmap agreed upon at the Sixth Meeting of the Policy Dialogue on 22-23 June 2016.

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  • 1-December-2016

    English

    The squeezed middle class in OECD and emerging countries – Myth and reality

    The conference will gather evidence on whether, to what extent and why the middle-class is, or is perceived to be, lagging behind in many countries; what is driving the real or perceived changes in its economic performance; what is its economic and political influence and what policies work in reaching out to the middle-class.

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  • 30-November-2016

    English, PDF, 883kb

    Effects of flexibility-enhancing reforms on employment transitions

    Do flexibility-enhancing reforms imply more employment instability? Using individual-level data from harmonised household surveys for 26 advanced countries, this paper analyses the effects of product and labour market reforms on transitions in and out of employment.

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  • 30-November-2016

    English, PDF, 996kb

    How do product market regulations affect workers? Evidence from the network industries

    Knowing who gains and loses from regulatory reform is important for understanding the political economy of reform. Using micro-level data from 26 countries, this paper studies how regulatory reform of network industries, a policy priority in many advanced economies, influences the labour market situation of workers in network industries.

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  • 30-November-2016

    English, PDF, 473kb

    Enhancing Economic Flexibility: What Is in It for Workers?

    This study investigates how making product or labour market regulation more flexible changes workers’ risks of moving out of employment and jobless people’s chances of becoming employed.

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  • 30-November-2016

    English, PDF, 843kb

    The ins and outs of employment in 25 OECD countries

    This paper presents quantitative information on labour market flows for 25 OECD countries. It uses household surveys that offer the advantage of reporting monthly transitions between employment, unemployment and economic inactivity for individuals.

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  • 30-November-2016

    English

    Enhancing Economic Flexibility: What Is in It for Workers?

    Reforms that boost growth by enhancing economic flexibility often meet strong opposition related to concerns that they may imply adverse consequences for categories of workers. This study investigates how making product or labour market regulation more flexible changes workers’ risks of moving out of employment and jobless people’s chances of becoming employed.

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  • 30-November-2016

    English

    Getting Skills Right: Sweden

    The costs of a persistent misalignment between the supply and demand for skills are substantial, ranging from lost wages for workers to lower productivity for firms and countries. Addressing skills imbalances has become even more of a concern as OECD governments reflect on the implications of technological progress, digitisation, demographic change and globalisation for jobs and work organisation. In light of these challenges, OECD has undertaken new research to shed light on how countries measure changing skill needs while ensuring that employment, training and migration institutions are responsive to the emergence of new skill requirements. The Getting Skills Right in Sweden review offers an in-depth analysis of the key areas where policy action is required to spur the development of an efficient system for skills assessment and anticipation to inform policy in the country. The report provides an assessment of practices in the following areas: i) the collection of information on existing and future skill needs; ii) the use of skill needs information to guide policy development in the areas of labour, education and migration; and iii) the existence of effective governance arrangements to ensure good co-ordination among the key stakeholders in the collection and use of skill needs information.

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