Social and welfare issues

OECD to launch How’s Life? at World Statistics and Policy Forum

 

 - Guadalajara, 13 October 2015 - 


29/09/2015 - Improving people’s well-being – not just boosting economic growth - should be a central objective for policy-makers, says the OECD.


Measuring well-being and quality of life has become increasingly important to good governance. The OECD’s latest How’s Life? report looks at a broad range of aspects that matter to people’s lives, such as jobs, income, health, housing , personal security, work-life balance, life satisfaction and social connections to help assess where progress is being made and where policies are failing. A special focus is given to children’s well-being, voluntary work and how quality of life varies according to which region of a country you live in.


How’s Life? 2015 will be presented by OECD Secretary-General Angel Gurría at the World Forum of Statistics, Knowledge and Policy in Guadalajara, Mexico on 13 October 2015, at 13.15.


Opened by Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto, and organised jointly with Mexico’s National Statistics Institute (INEGI), the World Forum will bring together international experts, politicians and civil society leaders - including prominent academics such as Joseph Stiglitz, Angus Deaton and Richard Layard.


In addition to the How’s Life? press conference, separate media briefings will be held during the three-day World Forum, including the presentation of a new report: “Measuring well-being in Mexico’s states”. Full details of media opportunities will be posted on the World Forum’s website.


Previous world fora on Statistics, Knowledge and Policy were held in Palermo, Italy (2004); Istanbul (2007), Busan, Korea (2009) and New Delhi (2012).


To register for the World Forum of Statistics Knowledge and Policy in Guadalajara, 13-15 October 2015, journalists should contact: media.registration@oecd.org .


To obtain an advance copy of How’s Life? embargoed until 13.00 Guadalajara time (18.00 GMT) Tuesday 13 October 2015; or for further information, journalists should contact the OECD’s Media Division (news.contact@oecd.org; tel. + 33 1 4524 9700).

 

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