Social and welfare issues

In It Together: Why Less Inequality Benefits All

Published on May 21, 2015

Also available in: French

book

The gap between rich and poor keeps widening. Growth, if any, has disproportionally benefited higher income groups while lower income households have been left behind. This long-run increase in income inequality not only raises social and political concerns, but also economic ones. It tends to drag down GDP growth, due to the rising distance of the lower 40% from the rest of society. Lower income people have been prevented from realising their human capital potential, which is bad for the economy as a whole. This book highlights the key areas where inequalities are created and where new policies are required, including: the consequences of current consolidation policies; structural labour market changes with rising non-standard work and job polarization; persisting gender gaps; the challenge of high wealth concentration, and the role for redistribution policies.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Foreword
Executive summary
Overview of inequality trends, key findings and policy directions
The impact of income inequality on economic growth
Income inequalities during the crisis and fiscal consolidation
Non-standard work, job polarisation and inequality
Women, work and income inequality
How does the concentration of household wealth compare across countries?
Inequality and fiscal redistribution in emerging economies
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NEWS AND SPEECHES


 

 

KEY COUNTRY FINDINGS

 

OECD's "Compare your income" WEB TOOL    

How much do you earn compared with others in your country? Do you feel rich, poor, or just average? Use this tool and found out how your income really compares.

 

  

DATA ON INCOME DISTRIBUTION AND INEQUALITY

 

 

Additional Material: Chapter 3 Income inequalities during the crisis and fiscal consolidation - COuntry FOCUS on Taxes and Benefits

Explanatory note

 

FURTHER READING

CONTACT

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