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  • 26-February-2019

    English

    Seize the opportunities of digital technology to improve well-being but also address the risks

    Digital technology can improve our lives but it also poses a major risk of widening social inequality and blocking opportunities for people without the skills to navigate the online world safely, according to a new OECD report.

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  • 26-February-2019

    English

    How's Life in the Digital Age? - Opportunities and Risks of the Digital Transformation for People's Well-being

    This report documents how the ongoing digital transformation is affecting people’s lives across the 11 key dimensions that make up the How’s Life? Well-being Framework (Income and wealth, Jobs and earnings, Housing, Health status, Education and skills, Work-life balance, Civic engagement and governance, Social connections, Environmental quality, Personal security, and Subjective well-being). A summary of existing studies highlights 39 key impacts of the digital transformation on people’s well-being. The review shows that these impacts can be positive as digital technologies expand the boundaries of information availability and enhance human productivity, but can also imply risks for people’s well-being, ranging from cyber-bullying to the emergence of disinformation or cyber-hacking. In sum, making digitalisation work for people’s well-being would require building equal digital opportunities, widespread digital literacy and strong digital security. Continued research and efforts in improving statistical frameworks will be needed to expand our knowledge on the many topics covered in this report.
  • 14-February-2019

    English

    OECD Global Parliamentary Network “Restoring Citizens’ Trust through Sound Policy Actions”

    We are here to share ideas and solutions for some of the most fundamental needs and rights of our citizens, the citizens that you, the lawmakers, serve and represent. Challenges like Housing; Energy; Rights in the digital age; Trust; and, the Integrity of elections, of governments, of institutions, will be on the agenda. How timely. How urgent. How pertinent

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  • 13-February-2019

    English

    Getting Skills Right: Future-Ready Adult Learning Systems

    With digitalisation, deepening globalisation and population ageing, the world of work is changing. The extent to which individuals, firms and economies can harness the benefits of these changes critically depends on the readiness of adult learning systems to help people develop relevant skills for this changing world of work. This report presents the key results from the Priorities for Adult Learning (PAL) Dashboard which facilitates comparisons between countries along seven dimensions of the readiness of adult learning systems to address future skill challenges. Based on the dashboard, the report highlights in which areas action is needed, and policy examples from OECD and emerging countries throughout the report illustrate how these actions could be implemented.
  • 12-February-2019

    English, PDF, 3,252kb

    How can we help stop child labour (Policy brief)

    Eradicating the worst forms of child labour is not only a moral imperative, it is also essential for ensuring that children can fully enjoy their childhood and fulfil their potential. To reach this goal, it is necessary to monitor child labour trends and identify the forms of child labour that have the most serious consequences on children’s lives.

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  • 8-February-2019

    English

    Engaging Employers and Developing Skills at the Local Level in Northern Ireland, United Kingdom

    The success of skills development activities through both on- and off-the job training often depends on the participation of employers. This OECD report on Northern Ireland, United Kingdom identifies a number of innovative programmes that aim to better engage employers in the design and delivery of training. It also looks at the role of local district councils in working closer with employers to better understand and address their skills challenges.A key part of the project was the implementation of a survey to gather information from Northern Irish employers about their skills needs and barriers to apprenticeship participation. The report offers a number of recommendations for improving business-education partnerships in emerging sectors of the Northern Ireland economy.
  • 28-January-2019

    English

    Income Inequality and Poverty

    Evidence on income distribution and poverty in OECD countries since the mid-80s, using data that correct for many of the features that limit cross-country and intertemporal comparisons in this field.

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  • 28-January-2019

    English

    Saving Costs in Chemicals Management - How the OECD Ensures Benefits to Society

    The chemical industry is one of the largest industrial sectors in the world and is expected to grow fourfold by 2060. Indeed modern life without chemicals would be inconceivable. Given the potential environmental and human health risks from exposure to chemicals, governments and industry have a major responsibility to ensure that chemicals are produced and used safely.The OECD assists countries in developing and implementing policies and instruments that protect human health and the environment, and in making their systems for managing chemicals as efficient as possible. To eliminate duplication of work and avoid non-tariff barriers to trade, emphasis has been on developing shared frameworks for gathering and assessing information on potential chemical risks. The time-tested OECD Mutual Acceptance of Data (MAD) system provides a major basis for generating savings to governments and industry. This report provides an overview of the benefits and estimates the total savings from OECD work to be more than EUR 309 million per year.
  • 21-January-2019

    English

    OECD Skills Strategy Flanders - Assessment and Recommendations

    Better skills policies help build economic resilience, boost employment and reinforce social cohesion. The OECD Skills Strategy provides countries with a framework to analyse their skills strengths and challenges. Each OECD Skills Strategy diagnostic report reflects a set of skills challenges identified by broad stakeholder engagement and OECD comparative evidence while offering concrete examples of how other countries have tackled similar skills challenges. These reports tackle questions such as: How can countries maximise their skills potential? How can they improve their performance in developing relevant skills, activating skills supply and using skills effectively? What is the benefit of a whole-of-government approach to skills? How can governments build stronger partnerships with employers, trade unions, teachers and students to deliver better skills outcomes? OECD Skills Strategy diagnostic reports provide new insights into these questions and help identify the core components of successful skills strategies. This report is part of the OECD’s ongoing work on building effective national and local skills strategies.
  • 11-January-2019

    English

    Ready to Help? - Improving Resilience of Integration Systems for Refugees and other Vulnerable Migrants

    This report looks at ways to improve the resilience of systems to deal with the unexpected arrival of large inflows of refugees and other vulnerable migrants. It begins with an overview of the recent flows of migrants seeking protection, discusses the expected economic impact of these flows, and notes what has been an unprecedented multilateral response. It then examines the process of integrating refugees and other vulnerable migrants, in terms of their economic and social outcomes, as well as specific factors of vulnerability. It also provides a comprehensive assessment of the transition policies in place to support their livelihood in destination and transit countries, as well as in origin countries upon return. Finally, the report tackles issues of anticipation, monitoring and reacting, examining the role of early warning mechanisms and the challenge of improving information so as to better monitor integration outcomes and frame policies.
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