By Date


  • 19-October-2017

    English

    Better Family Policies can help combine work and family commitments: Lessons from OECD countries

    I am delighted to be in Seoul, at the Joint Conference on Low Fertility, Challenges and Responses in the Era of Ageing Population. Let me first take this opportunity to thank our hosts: the Ministry of Health and Welfare and the Korean Institute of Health and Social Affairs (KIHASA). Our thanks also go to the Governments of Japan and China as well as to the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) for their support.

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  • 18-October-2017

    English

    Costa Rica has made major socio-economic progress but more efforts needed to reduce inequality and poverty

    Costa Rica enjoys relatively high life satisfaction levels, but should do more to develop a more inclusive and sustainable economy, according to a new OECD report.

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  • 18-October-2017

    English

    OECD Reviews of Labour Market and Social Policies: Costa Rica

    Costa Rica has recorded many social and economic achievements and currently enjoys one of the highest levels of well-being in the OECD. But progress has come to a standstill in most recent years and challenges have emerged along several social and labour market dimensions. Existing policies are outdated and no longer effective in today’s dynamic, export oriented economy which requires greater flexibility and more high skilled workers. How can Costa Rica better respond to the challenges of technological change and globalisation whilst minimising the transition costs it endures as it moves to a higher and a more sustainable path to inclusive growth? This report provides comprehensive analysis of Costa Rica’s policies and practices compared with best practice in the field of labour, social and migration from across the OECD and other countries in the Latin American region.  It contains several recommendations to tackle key challenges facing Costa Rica, including low labour utilisation, increasing inequality, high poverty and high-risk of economic exclusion especially of the low skilled and migrants.  This report will be of interest in Costa Rica as well as other countries looking to promote a more dynamic and an inclusive economy.

  • 18-October-2017

    English

    Preventing Ageing Unequally

    This report examines how the two global mega-trends of population ageing and rising inequalities have been developing and interacting, both within and across generations. Taking a life-course perspective the report shows how inequalities in education, health, employment and earnings compound, resulting in large differences in lifetime earnings across different groups. It suggests a policy agenda to prevent, mitigate and cope with inequalities along the life course drawing on good practices in OECD countries and emerging economies.

  • 18-October-2017

    English

    Population ageing and rising inequality will hit younger generations hard

    Younger generations will face greater risks of inequality in old age than current retirees and for generations born since the 1960s, their experience of old age will change dramatically.

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  • 11-October-2017

    English

    International Day of the Girl 2017

    IDG 2017

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  • 7-October-2017

    English

    Legal and social barriers holding back women’s empowerment in Middle East and North Africa

    Women in the Middle East and North Africa are better educated and better skilled than ever, yet legal and social barriers mean the share of them in work is still the lowest in the world. Bringing family and labour laws into line with gender goals would enable more women to enter employment and would make MENA economies more competitive and inclusive, according to a new OECD report.

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  • 7-October-2017

    English

    Women's Economic Empowerment in Selected MENA Countries - The Impact of Legal Frameworks in Algeria, Egypt, Jordan, Libya, Morocco and Tunisia

    This report examines how current legal provisions in Algeria, Egypt, Jordan, Libya, Morocco and Tunisia are impacting women’s ability to fully participate in economic life, both as employees and entrepreneurs. It is based on a comparative analysis of the various rights set out in constitutions, personal status laws, labour laws, in addition to tax and business laws. The report recognises the considerable progress made – in particular in the aftermath of the 2011 uprisings – following the adoption of constitutional and institutional reforms to strengthen women’s status.

    Yet ensuring sufficient opportunities for women remains a challenge in the six countries. The report suggests that this may be due to different factors such as: the existence of certain laws that are gender discriminatory, contradictions between various legal frameworks, lack of enforcement mechanisms, and barriers for women in accessing justice.  Through targeted policies, countries can tackle these challenges, and help unleash women’s potential to boost growth, competitiveness and inclusive social development.

  • 4-October-2017

    English

    Progress on gender equality far too slow

    Countries need to do much more to close gender gaps worldwide, according to a new OECD report.

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  • 18-September-2017

    English

    Powerful global coalition to boost equal pay for women at work - New initiative will support innovative and effective equal pay policies and practices around the globe

    One of the most persistent barriers to women’s success at work and to economic growth, unequal pay, will be actively challenged by a new global partnership, the Equal Pay International Coalition (EPIC).

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