By Date


  • 9-June-2015

    English, PDF, 732kb

    Policy Brief on social impact measurement for social enterprises (doc)

    The OECD programme on local economic and employment development (LEED) has advised governments and communities since 1982 on how to respond to economic change and tackle complex problems in a fast-changing world. Its mission is to contribute to the creation of more and better quality jobs through more effective policy implementation, innovative practices, stronger capacities and integrated strategies at the local level.

  • 29-May-2015

    English

    Why quotas work for gender equality

    Gender inequality is one of the most primitive and oldest forms of inequality. Sadly, it is still very much a reality in most parts of the world. In many countries women do not have equal access to education, healthcare, safety, work or political decision-making.

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  • 29-May-2015

    English

    Korea's work-life balance policies for sustainable growth

    Of the abundant resources given to mankind, what is the most underused resource of our time? Without a doubt, women!

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  • 29-May-2015

    English

    Middle-class economics

    In 2014, the US economy added more jobs than in any year since the 1990s. In fact, this longest streak of job growth on record has persisted into 2015. Inflation-adjusted wages are up by 1.4% annually over the last two years, more than twice the pace of the last recovery. But this is still not enough to make up for decades of subpar gains for middle-class families–a challenge shared by many other OECD economies.

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  • 27-May-2015

    English

    Business brief: Who cares for the caregivers

    Consistent careers are a hallmark of a successful retirement. However, too often, workers are called away from employment to care for loved ones, both young and old. Without adequate government or employer protections, workers risk losing valuable years of prime income earning and retirement contribution potential, while being paid nothing to take care of sick or disabled family.

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  • 21-May-2015

    English

    In It Together: Why Less Inequality Benefits All

    The gap between rich and poor keeps widening. Growth, if any, has disproportionally benefited higher income groups while lower income households have been left behind. This long-run increase in income inequality not only raises social and political concerns, but also economic ones. It tends to drag down GDP growth, due to the rising distance of the lower 40% from the rest of society. Lower income people have been prevented from realising their human capital potential, which is bad for the economy as a whole. This book highlights the key areas where inequalities are created and where new policies are required, including: the consequences of current consolidation policies; structural labour market changes with rising non-standard work and job polarization; persisting gender gaps; the challenge of high wealth concentration, and the role for redistribution policies.

  • 21-May-2015

    English

    Launch of "In It Together - Why Less Inequality Benefits All"

    For years now we have been underlining the toll that inequality takes on people’s lives. And I am proud of the contribution that the OECD has made in recent decades, putting inequality at the heart of the political and economic debate. This report proposes concrete policy solutions to promote opportunities for more inclusive growth.

  • 21-May-2015

    English

    Improving job quality and reducing gender gaps are essential to tackling growing inequality

    Income inequality has reached record highs in most OECD countries and remains at even higher levels in many emerging economies. The richest 10 per cent of the population in the OECD now earn 9.6 times the income of the poorest 10 per cent, up from 7:1 in the 1980s and 9:1 in the 2000s, according to a new OECD report.

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  • 21-May-2015

    English

    Compare your income

    When you think about your household’s income, do you feel rich, poor, or just average? Most of us have no idea – or the wrong idea – of how we compare with the rest of the population. But here, in 10 clicks, you can find out how many households are better or worse off than yours, and see how your ideal world compares.

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  • 21-May-2015

    English

    Income Inequality and Poverty

    Evidence on income distribution and poverty in OECD countries since the mid-80s, using data that correct for many of the features that limit cross-country and intertemporal comparisons in this field.

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