Denmark


  • 15-December-2016

    English

    Back to Work: Denmark - Improving the Re-employment Prospects of Displaced Workers

    Job displacement (involuntary job loss due to firm closure or downsizing) affects many workers over the course of their working lives. Displaced workers may face long periods of unemployment and, even when they find new jobs, tend to be paid less than in the jobs they held prior to displacement. Helping displaced workers get back into good jobs quickly should be a key goal of labour market policy. This report is the sixth in a series of reports looking at how this challenge is being tackled in a number of OECD countries. It shows that Denmark has effective policies in place to quickly assist people who are losing their jobs, in terms of both providing good re-employment support and securing adequate income in periods of unemployment. Despite a positive institutional framework, a sound collaboration between social partners and a favourable policy set-up, there is room to improve policies targeted to displaced workers as not every worker in Denmark can benefit from the same amount of support. In particular, workers affected by collective dismissals in larger firms receive faster and better support than those in small firms or involved in small or individual dismissals. Blue-collar workers are also treated less favourably than white-collar workers. More generally, low-skilled and older displaced workers struggle most to re-enter the labour market.

  • 17-November-2016

    English, PDF, 1,209kb

    Inequality in Denmark through the Looking Glass

    This paper delivers a broad assessment of income inequality in Denmark.

    Related Documents
  • 5-June-2014

    English

    Making the most of skills in Denmark

    Surveys suggest that Denmark ranks close to or slightly above the OECD average in terms of student and adult skills, even though Denmark spends more than many OECD countries on education, labour market policies and adult learning. Sluggish productivity growth over the past two decades raises the question of how to develop better skills and use them more efficiently to achieve stronger and more inclusive growth.

  • 5-November-2013

    English

    OECD report measures human cost of crisis; underlines need to invest in well-being

    The global economic crisis has had a profound impact on people’s well-being, reaching far beyond the loss of jobs and income, and affecting citizens’ satisfaction with their lives and their trust in governments, according to a new OECD report.

    Related Documents
  • 24-February-2012

    English

    Economic Policy Reforms: Going for Growth 2012: Country Notes

    Country Notes from OECD Economic Policy Reforms: Going for growth 2011 presenting OECD recommendations for structural reform priorities for individual countries.

  • 10-March-2010

    English, , 119kb

  • 7-April-2009

    English

    Economic Policy Reforms: Going for Growth 2011: Country Notes

    Country Notes from OECD Economic Policy Reforms: Going for growth 2011 presenting OECD recommendations for structural reform priorities for individual countries.

  • 3-March-2009

    English, , 123kb

    Economic Policy Reforms: Going for Growth 2009 - Denmark Country Note

    This note, taken from Chapter 3 of Economic Policy Reforms: Going for Growth 2009, contains information about the progress in implementing reforms in line with the 2008 priorities for Denmark.

  • 12-December-2008

    English

    Sickness, Disability and Work (Vol. 3): Denmark, Finland, Ireland and the Netherlands

    This third report in the OECD series Sickness, Disability and Work looks specifically at the cases of Denmark, Finland, Ireland and the Netherlands, and highlights the roles of institutions and policies.

  • 18-November-2008

    English

    Sickness, Disability and Work: Breaking the Barriers (Vol. 3) - Denmark, Finland, Ireland and the Netherlands

    Too many workers leave the labour market permanently due to health problems, and yet too many people with a disabling condition are denied the opportunity to work. This third report in the OECD series Sickness, Disability and Work explores the possible factors behind this paradox. It looks specifically at the cases of Denmark, Finland, Ireland and the Netherlands, and highlights the roles of institutions and policies. A range of reform recommendations is put forward to deal with specific challenges facing the four countries.

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