Slovak Republic

Secretary-General’s Official Visit to the Slovak Republic

 

Secretary-General’s Official Visit to the Slovak Republic

Bratislava, 6th December 2012


The Secretary-General of the OECD, Mr. Angel Gurría, will travel to Bratislava on 6 December 2012 on an Official Visit to the Slovak Republic. On this occasion, Mr. Gurría will present the OECD 2012 Economic Survey of the Slovak Republic together with the Prime Minister, Mr. Robert Fico, hold bilateral meetings with senior Government representatives and be awarded a Honorary degree by the University of Economics in Bratislava.

The visit will represent an important opportunity to discuss key OECD’s recommendations on structural reforms for Slovakia. While the Slovak economy remains strong, decisive policies are needed to make it more inclusive. The challenges going forward will be restoring public finances while driving down unemployment and fostering long-term inclusive growth.

In this context, Mr. Gurría will deliver remarks on “Challenges and opportunities for Slovakia - the OECD view” at a Roundtable discussion which will include Mr. Peter Kažimír, Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Finance; Mr. Štefan Chudoba, State Secretary of Education, Science, Research and Sport; Mr. Jozef Burian, State Secretary of Labour, Social Affairs and Family; and Mr. Peter Javorčík, State Secretary of Foreign and European Affairs.

At the University of Economics in Bratislava, Mr. Gurría will be awarded a Dr. Honoris Causa degree and will deliver a presentation on one of the most pressing challenges for restoring growth, creating jobs and better opportunities for European citizens -- the need to regain competitiveness and tackle imbalances in the euro area.                                                          

 

Related Documents

 

Slovak Republic remains strong, but it needs to become more inclusive, OECD says

Presentation of the Economic Survey of the Slovak Republic

Challenges and opportunities for Slovakia - the OECD view

The Challenge of Competitiveness in Europe: an OECD perspective