Reports


  • 30-November-2016

    English

    Revenue Statistics 2016: Country highlights

    This annual publication presents detailed country notes and internationally comparable tax data for all OECD countries from 1965 onwards.

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    Also AvailableEgalement disponible(s)
  • 30-November-2016

    English

    Consumption Tax Trends 2016: Country highlights

    This publication provides detailed country notes on Value Added Tax/Goods and Services Tax (VAT/GST) and excise duty rates in OECD member countries.

    Also AvailableEgalement disponible(s)
  • 24-November-2016

    English

    Green growth in countries and territories

    There are now 45 Adherents to the 2009 OECD Declaration on Green Growth. Georgia has joined Costa Rica, Colombia, Croatia, Kazakhstan, Latvia, Lithuania, Morocco, Peru, Tunisia, as well as OECD members in having adhered to the Declaration.

  • 31-May-2016

    English, PDF, 1,175kb

    How’s life in the Slovak Republic?

    This note presents selected findings based on the set of well-being indicators published in How’s life? 2016.

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  • 12-April-2016

    English

    Taxing Wages: Slovak Republic

    The tax burden on labour income is expressed by the tax wedge, which is a measure of the net tax burden on labour income borne by the employee and the employer.

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  • 12-April-2016

    English, PDF, 437kb

    Taxing Wages: Key findings for the Slovak Republic

    The Slovak Republic has the 12th highest tax wedge among the 34 OECD member countries in 2015. The country had the 11th highest position in 2014. The average single worker in the Slovak Republic faced a tax wedge of 41.3% in 2015 compared with the OECD average of 35.9%.

  • 1-April-2016

    English

    Making the Most of Public Investment in the Eastern Slovak Republic

    The Slovak Republic joined the European Union in 2004, the Schengen area in 2007 and the euro in 2009. These events, coupled with decentralisation reform and the creation of administrative regions, have brought significant change. While overall growth has been impressive compared to OECD countries overall, benefits have not accrued equally across the country. Public investment could potentially improve regional conditions and attract private funding, but governance bottlenecks stand in the way. This case study shows that the main obstacles to effective public investment are linked to high local fragmentation as well as the challenges national and subnational administrations face in designing and implementing investment strategies that correspond to local needs. Drawing on a detailed set of indicators, the study provides recommendations to address these challenges and make the most of public investment in the Slovak Republic.

  • 15-March-2016

    English, PDF, 317kb

    Fact sheet: Trends in Medical Education and Training in the Slovak Republic

    In the Slovak Republic, students can access medical education after having completed high school and having passed a university entrance examination. Since 2003, Slovakian medical schools are under the jurisdiction of the Ministry of Education, Science, Research and Sport, which also determines the financial resources available to them.

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  • 19-February-2016

    English

    A Skills beyond School Review of the Slovak Republic

    Higher level vocational education and training (VET) programmes are facing rapid change and intensifying challenges. What type of training is needed to meet the needs of changing economies? How should the programmes be funded?  How should they be linked to academic and university programmes?  How can employers and unions be engaged? The country reports in this series look at these and other questions. They form part of Skills beyond School, the OECD policy review of postsecondary vocational education and training.

  • 19-February-2016

    English

    OECD Reviews of School Resources: Slovak Republic 2015

    The effective use of school resources is a policy priority across OECD countries. The OECD Reviews of School Resources explore how resources can be governed, distributed, utilised and managed to improve the quality, equity and efficiency of school education.
    The series considers four types of resources: financial resources, such as public funding of individual schools; human resources, such as teachers, school leaders and education administrators; physical resources, such as location, buildings and equipment; and other resources, such as learning time.
    This series offers timely policy advice to both governments and the education community. It includes both country reports and thematic studies.

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