Publications & Documents


  • 21-November-2017

    English

    Scientometrics

    This page provides relevant information on OECD work on scientometrics and bibliometrics. This field has has evolved over time from the study of indices for improving information retrieval from peer-reviewed scientific publications (commonly described as the “bibliometric” analysis of science) to cover other types of documents and information sources relating to science and technology.

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  • 21-November-2017

    English

    ANBERD (Analytical Business Enterprise Research and Development) database

    Data set on R&D expenditure by industry which addresses the problems of international comparability and breaks in the time series of the official business enterprise R&D data.

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  • 17-November-2017

    English

    What role for social sciences in innovation? Re-assessing how scientific disciplines contribute to different industries

    Commonly used data and methodologies offer only partial perspectives on science-industry linkages. This policy paper offers new insights to better capture the contributions of social scientists and the complex disciplinary needs of the digital economy.

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  • 17-November-2017

    English

    Innovation statistics and indicators

    The OECD has played a key role in the development of international guidelines for surveys of business innovation and the design of indicators constructed with data from such surveys. In addition to developing methodological guidance, the OECD also carries out analytical studies using innovation-related indicators and microdata.

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  • 9-November-2017

    English

    Key nanotechnology indicators

    Indicators include nanotech firms, nanotech R&D, public sector R&D expenditure and nanotechnology patents.

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  • 9-November-2017

    English

    Key biotechnology indicators

    Statistics on biotechnology firms, biotechnology R&D (including public sector expenditures), biotech applications and patents.

  • 3-November-2017

    English

    Matching Crunchbase with patent data

    This paper describes a procedure to match companies and individuals listed in Crunchbase, a new database on innovative start-ups and companies, with patent applicants and inventors reported in PATSTAT, the worldwide intellectual property database maintained by the European Patent Office.

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  • 3-November-2017

    English

    Using Crunchbase for economic and managerial research

    This paper describes a new database on innovative start-ups and companies called Crunchbase, with a focus on its potential for economic and managerial research. It describes the contents of Crunchbase and reviews academic research that has used it. It further suggests that many more valuable avenues for economic and managerial research can be opened through the combination of Crunchbase and supplementary data sources.

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  • 27-October-2017

    English

    Assessing the Impact of Digital Government in Colombia - Towards a new methodology

    This review analyses the monitoring and evaluation system of Colombia's Online Government Strategy and provides recommendations for developing an impact assessment methodology for digital government. It looks at the background, evolution and current status of the Strategy, and draws insights from the first implementation of a transitional methodology. The findings will help Colombia build the tools and capacities needed to effectively and sustainably implement its digital government strategy.
  • 27-October-2017

    English

    Computers and the Future of Skill Demand

    Computer scientists are working on reproducing all human skills using artificial intelligence, machine learning and robotics. Unsurprisingly then, many people worry that these advances will dramatically change work skills in the years ahead and perhaps leave many workers unemployable.This report develops a new approach to understanding these computer capabilities by using a test based on the OECD’s Survey of Adult Skills (PIAAC) to compare computers with human workers. The test assesses three skills that are widely used at work and are an important focus of education: literacy, numeracy and problem solving with computers.Most workers in OECD countries use the three skills every day. However, computers are close to reproducing these skills at the proficiency level of most adults in the workforce. Only 13% of workers now use these skills on a daily basis with a proficiency that is clearly higher than computers.The findings raise troubling questions about whether most workers will be able to acquire the skills they need as these new computer capabilities are increasingly used over the next few decades. To answer those questions, the report’s approach could be extended across the full range of work skills. We need to know how computers and people compare across all skills to develop successful policies for work and education for the future.
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