By Date


  • 27-June-2016

    English

    The Productivity-Inclusiveness Nexus - Preliminary version

    The Productivity-Inclusiveness Nexus proposes a new approach to boost productivity growth while, at the same time, reducing inequalities of income and opportunities. The report begins by examining the trend slowdown of productivity growth, which has been observed in many OECD countries over recent years, and the longer-standing rise - and persistence - of inequalities of income, wealth, well-being and opportunities. It then gathers the most recent empirical evidence on some of the common foundations behind these trends and considers possible linkages. The analysis aims to shed light on policy insights to address both issues together, creating room for synergies and win-win policies.

  • 22-June-2016

    English

    Broadband Policies for Latin America and the Caribbean - A Digital Economy Toolkit

    This joint initiative by the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) and the OECD seeks to encourage the expansion of broadband networks and services in the region, supporting a coherent and cross-sectorial approach, to maximise their benefits for economic and social development. Drawing on a wealth of experience from LAC and OECD countries, the Toolkit outlines the main policy objectives in this area and provides guidance for their measurement, an overview of developments in the region, and a compilation of good practices in several areas related to broadband policy making. 
    This comprehensive volume encompasses a wealth of areas including digital strategies, regulatory frameworks, spectrum management, competition and infrastructure bottlenecks, broadband access, affordability, sector taxation, inclusion, convergence, regional integration, education, skills, business uptake, entrepreneurship, local content, e-health, digital government, consumer policy, and digital security and privacy.

     

  • 22-June-2016

    English

    Open Government Data Review of Mexico - Data Reuse for Public Sector Impact and Innovation

    Mexico has developed an ambitious national open data policy to create value from the use and re-use of government data by the public, private and social sectors. Open government data (OGD) has the potential to spur the digital economy, as well as contribute to more efficient public service delivery and greater public engagement. Mexico has demonstrated its commitment to OGD through its close involvement in international open data initiatives. However, it faces challenges in effectively implementing OGD domestically in a way that makes a greater impact on the economy and society. This would require, notably, institutionalizing open data, understanding the demand for government data, reaching out to potential users and working more closely with local governments. To fully realise the potential of open data, it is crucial that public bodies understand the benefits, are fully behind the project and actively participate in its implementation. This report provides an analysis of Mexico’s policies as well as recommendations for achieving its national objectives and making the most of OGD.

  • 31-May-2016

    English

    We need to talk about digital ethics

    Digital science and technology are at the heart of major economic, social and–in the eyes of some–anthropological shifts. That is why we need to think about the ethics of how these tools are produced and how they are used.

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  • 24-May-2016

    English

    Business brief: Jobs in the digital era work differently

    Ongoing innovation in technology is changing labour markets worldwide. To understand the future of work in the digital era, we need to move away from the traditional economic classification of manufacturing and non-manufacturing sectors.

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  • 13-May-2016

    English

    For an optimistic revolution

    The world has seen more than one industrial revolution and another one is already upon us. We should face it as optimists.

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  • 6-May-2016

    English

    A mystery in the machine

    Algorithms lie at the heart of machine learning, which, in turn lies at the heart of much of modern life–from online shopping to intelligence gathering. But most of us know little about these powerful tools and how they work. Is this wise?

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  • 4-May-2016

    English

    OECD Reviews of Innovation Policy: Luxembourg 2016

    This book provides a comprehensive assessment of the innovation policy of Luxembourg. It is the second such OECD review of Luxembourg's innovation system, following an earlier review published in 2007. Since that time, the system has undergone profound change, notably a rapid expansion in the scale and scope of public sector research, which offers new opportunities for Luxembourg, but also new challenges for innovation policy. The review focuses on the role of government and includes concrete recommendations on how to improve policies that affect innovation and R&D performance.

  • 27-April-2016

    English

    The Ocean Economy in 2030

    This report explores the growth prospects for the ocean economy, its capacity for future employment creation and innovation, and its role in addressing global challenges. Special attention is devoted to the emerging ocean-based industries in light of their high growth and innovation potential, and contribution to addressing challenges such as energy security, environment, climate change and food security.
     
    The report examines the risks and uncertainties surrounding the future development of ocean industries, the innovations required in science and technology to support their progress, their potential contribution to green growth and some of the implications for ocean management.  Finally, and looking across the future ocean economy as a whole, it explores possible avenues for action that could boost its long-term development prospects while managing the use of the ocean itself in responsible, sustainable ways.

     

  • 25-April-2016

    English

    Code is the poetry of a better world

    Code is the next universal language. In the 1970s punk rock drove a whole generation. In the 1980s it was probably money. For my generation, the interface to our imagination and to our world is software. This is why we need to get a more diverse set of people to see computers not as boring, mechanical and lonely things, but as something they can poke, tinker with and turn around.

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