By Date


  • 12-April-2011

    English

    OECD Insights Blog - The future is not what it used to be

    The way science is done has been changed radically by the connectivity offered by the Internet and other communication tools. This means that what has been called the science of science policy will have to change too, says this OECD Insights blogpost.

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  • 23-February-2011

    English

    OECD Insights Blog - Geomagnetic storms: the fire next time?

    The space weather forecast isn’t great. We’re enjoying a calm period in the 11-year solar cycle just now, but it’s coming to an end, reports the OECD Insights Blog in this piece on OECD's new study on geomagnetic storms.

  • 14-February-2011

    English

    OECD Insights Blog - Money alone won’t make Europe innovative

    What deep structural changes does Europe need to consider if it's to keep up in innovation? Andrew Wyckoff, Director of Science, Technology and Industry at the OECD addresses this and more in this OECD Insights blogpost.

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  • 12-December-2010

    English

    Building the new future

    “We cannot return to business-as-usual” has been a constant refrain since the economic crisis started. How can new growth sources be tapped? What about fighting poverty, and ensuring food and energy supplies while safeguarding our planet? OECD experts discuss the issues.

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  • 7-July-2010

    English, , 517kb

    OECD Biotechnology Newsletter No. 20

    The purpose of the OECD Biotechnology Update is to provide up-to-date information on the diverse activities at OECD related to biotechnology.

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  • 28-May-2010

    English

    The OECD Innovation Strategy - Getting a Head Start on Tomorrow

    Well-timed and targeted innovation boosts productivity, increases economic growth and helps solve societal problems. But how can governments encourage more people to innovate more of the time? And how can government itself be more innovative?

    The OECD Innovation Strategy provides a set of principles for fostering innovation in people (workers and consumers), in firms and in government. It takes an in-depth look at the scope of innovation and how it is changing, as well as where and how it is occurring. The result is the formulation of far-reaching policies for innovation using recent research and data.

    For more information about the OECD Innovation Strategy, see www.oecd.org/innovation/strategy.

    "a thoughtful new report on how governments can do better at spurring and measuring innovation."  -The Economist

  • 27-May-2010

    English

    Measuring Innovation - A New Perspective

    Measuring Innovation: A New Perspective presents new measures and new ways of looking at traditional indicators. It builds on 50 years of indicator development by OECD and goes beyond R&D to describe the broader context in which innovation occurs. It includes some experimental indicators that provide insight into new areas of policy interest. It highlights measurement gaps and proposes directions for advancing the measurement agenda.

    This publication begins by describing innovation today. It looks at what is driving innovation in firms, and how the scientific and research landscape is being reconfigured by convergence, interdisciplinarity and the new geography of innovation hot spots. It presents broader measures of innovation, for example using new indicators of investment in intangible assets and trademarks. 

    Human capital is the basic input of innovation, and a series of indicators looks at how well education systems are contributing to the knowledge and research bases. Further series examine how firms transform skills and knowledge, and shed light on the different roles of public and private investment in fostering innovation and reaping its rewards, with concrete examples from major global challenges such as health and climate change.

    Measuring Innovation is a major step towards evidence-based innovation policy making. It complements traditional “positioning”-type indicators with ones that show how innovation is, or could be, linked to policy.  It also recognises that much more remains to be done, and points to the  measurement challenges statisticians, researchers and policy makers alike need to address.

  • 20-November-2009

    English

    Innovation in Firms - A Microeconomic Perspective

    Innovation has become a key factor for economic growth, but how does the process take place at the level of individual firms? This book presents the main results of the OECD Innovation Microdata Project -- the first large-scale effort to exploit firm-level data from innovation surveys across 20 countries in an internationally harmonised way, with a view to addressing common analytical questions. Through the use of common indicators and econometric modeling, this analytical report presents a broad overview of how firms innovate in different countries, highlights some of the limitations of current innovation surveys, and identifies directions for future research.

  • 20-November-2009

    English

    Innovation and Growth - Chasing a Moving Frontier

    Innovation is crucial to long-term economic growth, even more so in the aftermath of the financial and economic crisis. In this volume, the OECD and the World Bank jointly take stock of how globalisation is posing new challenges for innovation and growth in both developed and developing countries, and how countries are coping with them. The authors discuss options for policy initiatives that can foster technological innovation in the pursuit of faster and sustainable growth.

     

    The various chapters highlight how the emergence of an integrated global market affects the impact of national innovation policy. What seemed like effective innovation strategies (e.g. policies designed to strengthen the R&D capacity of domestic firms) are no longer sufficient for effective catch-up. The more open and global nature of innovation makes innovation policies more difficult to design and implement at the national scale alone. These challenges are further complicated by new phenomena, such as global value chains and the fragmentation of production, the growing role of global corporations, and the ICT revolution. Where and why a global corporation chooses to anchor its production affects the playing field for OECD and developing economies alike.

    Selected as a 2009 Notable Document by the American Library Association Government Documents Round Table.

  • 21-July-2009

    English

    OECD Reviews of Innovation Policy: Korea 2009

    This report assesses the current status of Korea’s innovation system and policies, and identifies where and how the government should focus its efforts to improve the country’s innovation capabilities. It finds that Korea has one of the highest rates of spending on R&D in the world, much of which is performed by private firms. It also has a highly educated labour force – as signalled by its impressive PISA performance and exceptionally high rates of tertiary level graduation – with a strong interest in science and technology.

    However, a number of bottlenecks persist that hamper Korea’s economic convergence with the leading OECD economies. These include a relatively weak SME sector and weak performance in services, as well as lagging capacities to conduct leading-edge research in many areas. Furthermore, Korea faces numerous threats in the mid term, notably increased levels of competition from China and other newly-industrialising economies, the lowest fertility rate in the OECD and an ageing society, and a continuing high dependency on imports of natural resources, particularly hydrocarbons. In the shorter term, the economic crisis offers its own challenges, with the need for some policy adjustments to deal with expected falls in business investment in R&D and growing levels of unemployment among the highly skilled.

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