Publications & Documents


  • 18-February-2015

    English

    Governing the City: The case study of Frankfurt, Germany

    This chapter studies the governance of the Frankfurt metropolitan area. It focuses on public transport and spatial planning issues. It provides an overview of the economic conditions in the metropolitan area and analyses the role of the regional association of municipalities (Regionalverband FrankfurtRheinMain) and the state of Hesse for metropolitan governance.

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  • 18-February-2015

    English

    Governing the City: The case study of Daejeon, Korea

    This chapter begins with a brief socio-economic and institutional overview of the Daejeon metropolitan region. It then explores the current status of inter-municipal collaboration in two major sectors for urban development: transport and land use. Finally, it reviews existing metropolitan collaboration tools.

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  • 18-February-2015

    English

    Governing the City: The case study of Chicago, United States

    This chapter aims to assess the degree of fragmentation in the metropolitan governance in Chicago (Illinois), United States and its impact on transport and land-use planning, and to identify possible avenues for reform.

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  • 18-February-2015

    English

    Governing the City: The case study of Athens-Attica, Greece

    This chapter discusses existing metropolitan governance arrangements in Athens-Attica, with a closer look at the governance of two strategic sectors: transport and spatial planning. It concludes with possible considerations for strengthening future policy co-ordination in the metropolitan area.

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  • 18-February-2015

    English

    Governing the City: The case study of Aix-Marseille, France

    This chapter begins with a brief socio-economic and institutional overview of the Marseille metropolitan region. It then explores the current status of inter-municipal collaboration, in particular with respect to public transport and spatial planning. Lastly, it discusses the metropolitan governance reforms of 2013.

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  • 18-February-2015

    English

    Governing the City

    How do cities govern themselves as they grow bigger? The answer can shape the competitiveness and quality of life in those cities and depends on a number of factors, ranging from the country's institutional framework to the cities' specific socioeconomic dynamics. This report presents a typology of metropolitan governance arrangements observed across OECD countries and offers guidance for cities seeking for more effective co-ordination, with a closer look at two sectors that are strategic importance for urban growth: transport and spatial planning.

    The report draws from international examples of metropolitan governance mechanisms, and includes a series of in-depth case studies in a selection of six large metropolitan areas: Aix-Marseille (France), Frankfurt (Germany), Athens (Greece), Daejeon (Korea), Puebla-Tlaxcala (Mexico), and Chicago (United States).

  • 18-February-2015

    English

    The Metropolitan Century - Understanding Urbanisation and its Consequences

    The report provides an outline of recent and likely future urbanisation trends and discusses the consequences. The world is in the middle of an urbanisation process that will cause urbanisation rates to rise from low double digit rates to more than 80% by the end of the century. It argues that this is both a great opportunity and a great challenge, as decisions taken today will affect the lifes of people for a long time to come. The report aims at explaining why cities exist, and what can make them prosperous and function well. It also discusses whether cities are good for residents, for the countries they are located in and for the global environment. The report argues that cities exist and grow because they are a source of economic prosperity and offer amenities that benefit their residents. It concludes that urbanisation is a process that needs to be shaped by policy makers to ensure that all benefit from it.

     

  • 6-January-2015

    English

    OECD Urban Policy Reviews: Mexico 2015 - Transforming Urban Policy and Housing Finance

    In parallel to a sweeping structural reform agenda, Mexico announced in 2013 a new approach to housing and urban policy. Calling for a more explicit qualitative focus on housing and the urban environment, the policy shift is a welcome development. Mexico urbanised more rapidly than most OECD countries in the past half-century, in part as a result of the expansion of housing finance led by INFONAVIT and facilitated by policies aiming to expand access to formal housing. Yet the quantitative push for formal housing came with quantitative costs: inefficient development patterns resulting in a hollowing out of city centres and the third-highest rate of urban sprawl in the OECD; increasing motorisation rates; a significant share of vacant housing, with one-seventh of the housing stock uninhabited in 2010; housing developments with inadequate access to public transport and basic urban services; and social segregation. How can the Mexican authorities “get cities right” and develop more competitive, sustainable and inclusive cities? How can they improve the capacity of the relevant institutions and foster greater collaboration among them? How can INFONAVIT ensure that its lending activities generate more sustainable urban outcomes as it also fulfils its pension mandate and help Mexicans save more for retirement?

  • 6-January-2015

    Spanish

    Presentación del Estudio de Política Urbana de la OCDE: México, Transformando la Política Urbana y el Financiamiento de la Vivienda

    México ha logrado reducir, en gran medida y a una velocidad notable, el déficit cuantitativo de vivienda del país. La adopción e implementación de una política de vivienda más flexible y el fortalecimiento de la política nacional de desarrollo urbano le permitirían beneficiarse del crecimiento económico y sustentable de las ciudades, afirma la OCDE.

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  • 8-December-2014

    English

    OECD Port-Cities Programme

    The OECD Port-Cities Programme aims to identify how ports can be assets for urban development. The programme therefore assesses the impact of ports on cities and regions. It also compares policies aimed at increasing positive regional impacts of ports and limiting negative effects.

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