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Publications & Documents


  • 23-November-2020

    English

    Job Creation and Local Economic Development 2020 - Rebuilding Better

    The impact of COVID-19 on local jobs and workers dwarfs those of the 2008 global financial crisis. The 2020 edition of Job Creation and Local Economic Development considers the short-term impacts on local labour markets as well as the longer-term implications for local development. Chapter 1 explores the immediate local employment impacts of the crisis, the divides within and across local labour markets even prior to the pandemic, and the likely diverging recovery patterns. Chapter 2 considers the underlying trends that COVID-19 will accelerate (digitalisation, the automation of jobs and polarisation of skill profiles; a transition to greener jobs) or slow down (reconfigured global supply chains, concentration of the high skilled in largest cities). Chapter 3 explores local action in the recovery. It highlights the strategies to strengthen local employment services and training providers to meet the increased demand for job placement and skills upgrading, particularly for the most disadvantaged workers (youth, low-skilled, women) or business development to serve the hardest hit firms and sectors (tourism, culture, hospitality). It also considers strategies and tools to 'rebuild better' by rethinking local development futures, taking advantage of the changing geography of jobs due to remote working or other opportunities such as the social economy. Individual country profiles are available online.
  • 19-November-2020

    English

    The impact of the COVID-19 crisis on regional and local governments - Main findings from the joint CoR-OECD survey

    This Brief summarises the main findings from the CoR-OECD COVID-19 Survey on 'The impact of the COVID-19 crisis on regional and local governments: governance, finance and recovery plans'. This on-line survey was carried out in June and July 2020 among representatives of subnational governments of the European Union. Answers were received from 300 subnational government respondents representing 24 countries.
  • 18-November-2020

    English

    Managing Environmental and Energy Transitions for Regions and Cities

    This report offers guidance on how to prepare regions and cities for the transition towards a climate-neutral and circular economy by 2050 and is directed to all policymakers seeking to identify and implement concrete and ambitious transition pathways. It describes how cities, regions, and rural areas can manage the transition in a range of policy domains, including energy supply, conversion, and use, the transformation of mobility systems, and land use practices. It takes stock of discussions between academic and policy experts emanating from a series of high-level expert workshops organised in 2019 by the OECD and the European Commission. Bringing together frontier thinking and practical examples regarding the transition to a climate-neutral economy, the transition to a circular economy, the transition in cities, the transition in rural areas, and financing and scale-up of transition action, this report identifies cross-cutting lessons to support urban, regional, and rural decision makers in managing trade-offs and in promoting, facilitating and enabling environmental and energy transitions.
  • 17-November-2020

    English

    An insight into the innovative start-up landscape of Friuli-Venezia Giulia - A tale of two sub-regions?

    This paper offers an in-depth analysis of the characteristics of innovative start-up firms in Friuli-Venezia Giulia, an autonomous region situated at the extreme North East of the Italian territory, bordering with Austria and Slovenia. This work is part of a series of thematic papers on sub-national start-up landscapes in Italy, produced by the OECD Trento Centre for Local Development. Following the 2018 OECD Evaluation of the Italian Start-up Act, which embraced a national perspective, it represents a first attempt to analyse the impact of this policy at the local level. Friuli-Venezia Giulia hosts a polycentric, mainly urban start-up landscape, with a low prevalence of female and young founders. Its historical sub-regions of Friuli and Venezia Giulia present remarkable differences under several perspectives, including the industrial composition of their start-ups, the spread of emerging technologies among them and their propensity to use national incentives. Firm dynamism, notably high-growth and exit trends, constitutes another major focus of this work, which concludes with a set of evidence-based recommendations for policy-makers.
  • 17-November-2020

    English

    An insight into the innovative start-up landscape of South Tyrol - A language barrier to effective policy transfer?

    The characteristics of innovative start-up firms in South Tyrol, the northernmost province of Italy, entirely mountainous, hosting a high-income population belonging to three main language groups. This work is part of a series of thematic papers on sub-national start-up landscapes in Italy, produced by the OECD Trento Centre for Local Development. It represents a first attempt to analyse the effect of the Italian policy framework for young innovative firms at the local level. South Tyrol is home to a relatively small number of registered innovative start-ups, pointing to the presence of obstacles to policy transfer. Evidence suggests that language barriers may play a critical role. Firm dynamism, in particular high-growth and exit trends, the spread of emerging technologies among local start-ups as well as their propensity to uptake national incentives are other major focuses of this work, which concludes with a set of evidence-based recommendations for policy-makers.
  • 17-November-2020

    English

    An insight into the innovative start-up landscape of Trentino - Is it time for the “Start-up Valley” to scale up?

    This paper offers an in-depth analysis of the characteristics of innovative start-up firms in Trentino, a high-income mountainous area in the North East of Italy. This work is part of a series of thematic papers on regional start-up landscapes in Italy, produced by the OECD Trento Centre for Local Development. Following the 2018 OECD Evaluation of the Italian Start-up Act, which embraced a national perspective, it represents a first attempt to analyse the impact of this policy at the local level. Among Italian regions, Trentino boasts the highest density of registered innovative start-ups over all young firms established locally. However, innovative start-ups spread unevenly throughout this territory, concentrating in urban areas. Female and young founders are less prevalent than in Italy at large. Firm dynamism, in particular high-growth and exit trends, the uptake of emerging technologies among local start-ups as well as their propensity to use national incentives are other key areas of this work, which concludes with a set of evidence-based recommendations for policy makers.
  • 17-November-2020

    English

    Exploring policy options on teleworking - Steering local economic and employment development in the time of remote work

    This paper explores and classifies some of the most common policy options adopted by national, regional and local policy makers in the context of or prior to the COVID-19 pandemic to enable, encourage and make the most of teleworking. It also considers efforts to foster the attraction and retention of remote workers and entrepreneurs in particular places. The current crisis represents, among other things, a mass experiment in teleworking, unprecedented in size and scope. A shift towards large-scale, long-lasting teleworking would have profound implications for the geography of local employment. However, SMEs may be less equipped than larger firms to face this change. Public policy can play an important role in turning teleworking into an opportunity for all, to minimise the potential of widening pre-existing disparities between people, places and firms.
  • 16-November-2020

    English

    A territorial approach to the Sustainable Development Goals in Viken, Norway

    Viken, Norway, was officially formed as a new county on 1 January 2020, merging the previous counties of Akershus, Buskerud and Østfold. The newly elected county government has endorsed the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) as a holistic framework for implementing the Regional Planning Strategy for a Sustainable Viken 2020‑2024, within a complex governance landscape and the concept of planetary boundaries. Viken’s sustainable development challenges and opportunities vary across its 51 municipalities, and between highly urbanised and largely rural areas. A Territorial Approach to the SDGs will help maximise the assets and strengths of all territories of the county and promote better access to economic development opportunities, labour market, skills and education across the county where disparities are witnessed between rural areas and urban centres.
  • 16-November-2020

    English

    A territorial approach to the Sustainable Development Goals in Southern Denmark, Denmark

    The region of Southern Denmark shows strong performance towards attaining most of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and is expected to further increase its efforts through its regional development strategy Southern Denmark of the Future 2020-2023, embracing the SDGs. With low poverty rates and inequality, high satisfaction with the regional government’s efforts, as well as signs of strong innovative potential, the region appears well equipped to tackle environmental challenges, such as reducing air pollution and cleaning up historically polluted sites. A Territorial Approach to the SDGs will help to progress the well-being and quality of life in Southern Denmark and support municipalities to use the SDGs to improve their local development strategies and actions, scale up initiatives that involve schools and civil society in the SDGs and further develop the potential for public-private partnerships.
  • 16-November-2020

    English

    A territorial approach to the Sustainable Development Goals in Flanders, Belgium

    Global demographic, climate and digitalisation megatrends are transforming the policy environment in Flanders, Belgium. With strong economic performance, low unemployment and a well-educated population, Flanders is using the SDGs to respond to these megatrends in pursuit of the seven transition priorities outlined in its Vision 2050 policy framework, namely circular economy, smart living, industry, lifelong learning, caring and living together, transport and mobility, and energy. The SDGs provide a common language and framework to mobilise Flemish cities and municipalities, private sector, civil society and youth in such a transition. This is why, Flanders has also developed Focus 2030 with more concrete and mid-term objectives to adapt and implement the SDGs at regional level. The report argues that a territorial approach to the SDGs can accelerate the transition to more sustainable pathways in Flanders if federal, regional, provincial and local sustainable development strategies are strategically aligned, and sufficient funding from both public and private sectors is ensured for innovative sustainability solutions.
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