Publications


  • 9-October-2018

    English

    Good Regulatory Practices to Support Small and Medium Enterprises in Southeast Asia

    Small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) can find it challenging to cope and comply with regulations and adapt regulatory changes. Good regulatory practice (GRP) helps create a stable and enabling regulatory environment for investment, trade, and entrepreneurhsip, and thus supports healthy economies and regional competitiveness. This report is the first comprehensive stock-taking of GRP implementation in Southeast Asia to support local SMEs and their integration into global value chains. For each of the ten countries of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN), the report provides examples of GRP tools and approaches in areas such as administrative burden reduction, e-government, regulatory impact assessment, ex post evaluation, and stakeholder consultation. The report also includes an overview of collective efforts pursued at the ASEAN level to promote the GRP agenda across the region.
  • 9-October-2018

    English

    International Trade by Commodity Statistics - Volume 2018 Issue 5

    This reliable source of yearly data covers a wide range of statistics on international trade of OECD countries and provides detailed data in value by commodity and by partner country. Each of the first five volumes of International Trade by Commodity Statistics contains the tables for six countries, published in the order in which they become available. The sixth volume also includes the OECD country groupings OECD Total and EU28-Extra.For each country, this publication shows detailed tables relating to the Harmonised System HS 2012 classification, Sections and Divisions (one- and two- digit). Each table presents imports and exports of a given commodity with more than seventy partner countries or country groupings for the most recent five-year period available.
  • 6-October-2018

    English

    Road and Rail Infrastructure in Asia - Investing in Quality

    Road and Rail Infrastructure in Asia: Investing in Quality discusses the challenges facing the region and possible policy options, including those previously or currently used in Emerging Asian countries, with reference to the experiences of OECD member countries. It provides analysis and recommendations for the region’s policy makers to consider in their efforts to improve the quality of infrastructure. In particular, it highlights the importance of considering the spill-over effects of infrastructure in investment decisions. A comprehensive infrastructure impact evaluation does not simply consider the financial feasibility of an individual project, but attempts to judge the full extent of the externalities of planned investments, looking at the positive and negative economic, social and environmental effects over different time periods. The report first presents project case studies, illustrating how policy makers have incorporated the principles of quality infrastructure. It then examines the local economic impact of infrastructure, the role of local governments in infrastructure development and the benefits and challenges of their involvement. It then goes on to discuss different infrastructure financing options including funding from public and private sectors, as well as public-private partnerships, and concludes with a focus on fostering improved alignment between national development strategies and infrastructure planning.
  • 4-October-2018

    English

    Innovation, Agricultural Productivity and Sustainability in China

    The expansion of agricultural production in China has been remarkable, but at the expense of the sustainable use of its natural resources. To counter this, as well as to face problems due to rising labour costs and a rapidly ageing rural population, agricultural production must concentrate on a smaller number of more productive farms. It is in this light that this report reviews recent policy developments to assess whether they have been conducive to productivity growth and environmental sustainability. It finds that the conditions for structural change and innovation at the farm level in China could be further improved by securing the long-term stability of land rights as well as reducing transaction costs. Greater policy coherence with agri-environmental policy objectives could also be achieved through stricter enforcement of environmental regulations. Finally, the agricultural innovation system could play a greater role by placing the focus on public agricultural R&D in areas such as the environment and resource conservation, and in other areas which do not attract much private sector investment. 
  • 1-October-2018

    English

    Supporting Entrepreneurship and Innovation in Higher Education in The Netherlands

    The higher education sector in The Netherlands offers excellent examples of what it means to be innovative and entrepreneurial, and promote entrepreneurial mind sets, entrepreneurship and knowledge exchange. Creating value from academic knowledge through innovative services, products, processes and business models that meet economic, social and environmental needs lies at the core of this strategy. The current challenge is to strenghten the anchoring of value-creation processes in education and research. This can be achieved through increased interdisciplinarity, entrepreneurial mindset development across all subject areas, incentives for effective wider world engagement of researchers and students, and growth-oriented support for startups. This report presents an in-depth analysis of the policy framework and institutional practices and provides useful guidance for policy makers and university leaders across the world. HEInnovate is a joint initiative of the European Commission and the OECD to promote the innovative and entrepreneurial higher education institution.
  • 27-September-2018

    English

    Open Government Data Report - Enhancing Policy Maturity for Sustainable Impact

    This report provides an overview of the state of open data policies across OECD member and partner countries, based on data collected through the OECD Open Government Data survey (2013, 2014, 2016/17), country reviews and comparative analysis. The report analyses open data policies using an analytical framework that is in line with the OECD OUR data Index and the International Open Data Charter. It assesses governments’ efforts to enhance the availability, accessibility and re-use of open government data. It makes the case that beyond countries’ commitment to open up good quality government data, the creation of public value requires engaging user communities from the entire ecosystem, such as journalists, civil society organisations, entrepreneurs, major tech private companies and academia. The report also underlines how open data policies are elements of broader digital transformations, and how public sector data policies require interaction with other public sector agendas such as open government, innovation, employment, integrity, public budgeting, sustainable development, urban mobility and transport. It stresses the relevance of measuring open data impacts in order to support the business case for open government data.
  • 27-September-2018

    English

    OECD Institutional Investors Statistics 2018

    Institutional investors (investment funds, insurance companies and pension funds) are major collectors of savings and suppliers of funds to financial markets. Their role as financial intermediaries and their impact on investment strategies have grown significantly over recent years along with deregulation and globalisation of financial markets.
    This publication provides a unique set of statistics that reflect the level and structure of the financial assets and liabilities of institutional investors in the OECD countries (with the exception of Australia), and in Russian Federation. Concepts and definitions are predominantly based on the System of National Accounts. Data are derived from national sources.
    Data include outstanding amounts of financial assets and liabilities such as currency and deposits, securities, loans, and shares. When relevant, they are further broken down according to maturity and residency. The publication covers investment funds, of which open-end companies and closed-end companies, as well as insurance corporations and autonomous pension funds. Indicators are presented as percentages of GDP allowing for international comparisons, and at country level, both in national currency and as percentages of total financial assets of the investor. Time series display available data for the last eight years.
    DATA ALSO AVAILABLE ON LINE
    The electronic data product provides longer time series: data from 1980 onwards are included.
  • 26-September-2018

    English

    Quarterly National Accounts - Volume 2018 Issue 2

    The OECD’s Quarterly National Accounts contains a selection of the accounts most widely used by economic analysts: GDP by expenditure, GDP by industry, GDP by income, gross fixed capital formation by asset, gross fixed capital formation by institutional sector, Saving and Net lending and components of disposable income as well as population and employment data (national concept) and employment by industry (domestic concept).The data cover 36 OECD countries, and totals are provided for the following groups: OECD, OECD-Europe, European Union, Euro area, G7 and G20.Data are based on the System of National Accounts 2008 (2008 SNA) for all OECD members.
  • 25-September-2018

    English

    PISA for Development Assessment and Analytical Framework - Reading, Mathematics and Science

    'What is important for citizens to know and be able to do?' The OECD Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) seeks to answer that question through the most comprehensive and rigorous international assessment of student knowledge and skills. As more countries join its ranks, PISA is evolving to successfully cater for a larger and more diverse group of participants. The OECD launched the PISA for Development initiative in 2014 to support evidence-based policy making globally and offer universal tools in monitoring progress towards the Education Sustainable Development Goal. Spanning six years, this unique pilot project aims to make the assessment more accessible and relevant to a wider range of countries, while maintaining the overall PISA framework and accordance with PISA’s technical standards and usual practices.The PISA for Development Assessment and Analytical Framework presents the conceptual foundations of the project, and covers reading, mathematics and science. PISA for Development has a school-based component and an out-of-school one. For the school-based component, a questionnaire about students’ background is distributed to all participating students. School principals complete a school questionnaire that describes the school, its students and teachers, and the learning environment. Teachers also complete a questionnaire about themselves, the school’s resources, their teaching practice and their students. The out-of-school respondents complete a background questionnaire, and their parent (or person most knowledgeable about them) answers a questionnaire about the youth’s background and childhood experiences. A household observation questionnaire is completed by the interviewer, and information about the location of the household is collected by PISA for Development National Centres.Nine countries participated in the PISA for Development assessment: Bhutan, Cambodia, Ecuador, Guatemala, Honduras, Panama, Paraguay, Senegal and Zambia.
  • 24-September-2018

    English

    Indigenous Employment and Skills Strategies in Canada

    This report looks at a range of key labour market, economic and social indicators related to Canada’s growing Indigenous population, which comprises First Nations, Inuit and Métis. In 2016, there were over 1.6 million Indigenous People in Canada, accounting for 4.9% of the total population, which is a significant increase from 3.8% in 2006. The report looks at the implementation of the federal government’s Indigenous Skills and Employment Training Strategy through in-depth analysis across four case study areas, including 1) the Centre for Aboriginal Human Resources and Development in Winnipeg, Manitoba; 2) Community Futures Treaty Seven in Calgary, Alberta; 3) MAWIW Council in Fredericton, New Brunswick; and 4) Kiikenomaga Kikenjigewen Employment and Training Services (KKETS) in Thunder Bay, Ontario. The report highlights critical success factors to better link Indigenous People to high quality jobs while also providing recommendations regarding future labour market and skills programming for Indigenous People in Canada.
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