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Publications


  • 30-July-2019

    English

    Making Dispute Resolution More Effective – MAP Peer Review Report, Colombia (Stage 1) - Inclusive Framework on BEPS: Action 14

    Under Action 14, countries have committed to implement a minimum standard to strengthen the effectiveness and efficiency of the mutual agreement procedure (MAP). The MAP is included in Article 25 of the OECD Model Tax Convention and commits countries to endeavour to resolve disputes related to the interpretation and application of tax treaties. The Action 14 Minimum Standard has been translated into specific terms of reference and a methodology for the peer review and monitoring process. The minimum standard is complemented by a set of best practices. The peer review process is conducted in two stages. Stage 1 assesses countries against the terms of reference of the minimum standard according to an agreed schedule of review. Stage 2 focuses on monitoring the follow-up of any recommendations resulting from jurisdictions' stage 1 peer review report. This report reflects the outcome of the stage 1 peer review of the implementation of the Action 14 Minimum Standard by Colombia.
  • 30-July-2019

    English

    Making Dispute Resolution More Effective – MAP Peer Review Report, Chile (Stage 1) - Inclusive Framework on BEPS: Action 14

    Under Action 14, countries have committed to implement a minimum standard to strengthen the effectiveness and efficiency of the mutual agreement procedure (MAP). The MAP is included in Article 25 of the OECD Model Tax Convention and commits countries to endeavour to resolve disputes related to the interpretation and application of tax treaties. The Action 14 Minimum Standard has been translated into specific terms of reference and a methodology for the peer review and monitoring process. The minimum standard is complemented by a set of best practices. The peer review process is conducted in two stages. Stage 1 assesses countries against the terms of reference of the minimum standard according to an agreed schedule of review. Stage 2 focuses on monitoring the follow-up of any recommendations resulting from jurisdictions' stage 1 peer review report. This report reflects the outcome of the stage 1 peer review of the implementation of the Action 14 Minimum Standard by Chile.
  • 30-July-2019

    English

    Making Dispute Resolution More Effective – MAP Peer Review Report, Lithuania (Stage 1) - Inclusive Framework on BEPS: Action 14

    Under Action 14, countries have committed to implement a minimum standard to strengthen the effectiveness and efficiency of the mutual agreement procedure (MAP). The MAP is included in Article 25 of the OECD Model Tax Convention and commits countries to endeavour to resolve disputes related to the interpretation and application of tax treaties. The Action 14 Minimum Standard has been translated into specific terms of reference and a methodology for the peer review and monitoring process. The minimum standard is complemented by a set of best practices. The peer review process is conducted in two stages. Stage 1 assesses countries against the terms of reference of the minimum standard according to an agreed schedule of review. Stage 2 focuses on monitoring the follow-up of any recommendations resulting from jurisdictions' stage 1 peer review report. This report reflects the outcome of the stage 1 peer review of the implementation of the Action 14 Minimum Standard by Lithuania.
  • 26-July-2019

    English

    Exploring clean energy pathways - The role of CO2 storage

    Carbon capture, utilisation and storage will be an important part of the portfolio of technologies and measures needed to achieve climate and energy goals. In the International Energy Agency Clean Technology Scenario (CTS), a cumulative 107 gigatonnes of carbon dioxide (Gt CO2) are permanently stored in the period to 2060, requiring a significant scale-up of CO2 storage from today’s levels. This report analyses the implications for the global energy system of CO2 storage facilities not being developed at the scale and pace needed to follow the optimised pathway of the CTS. By limiting CO2 storage availability to 10 Gt CO2 over the scenario period, the analysis provides insights into the additional measures and technologies that would be required in the power, industrial, transport and buildings sectors in order to achieve the same emissions reductions by 2060 as the CTS.The Limited CO2 Storage scenario variant (LCS) finds that restricting the role of CO2 storage would result in higher costs and significantly higher electricity demand, with 3 325 gigawatts of additional new generation capacity required relative to the CTS (a 17% increase). The main reason is that limiting the availability of CO2 storage would require much more widespread use of electrolytic hydrogen in industry and the production of synthetic hydrocarbon fuels. More generally, the LCS would increase reliance on technologies that are at an earlier stage of development. Beyond the scenario period of 2060, constraints on CO2 storage availability would also limit the availability of many carbon dioxide removal options, and may therefore not be consistent with the achievement of long-term climate goals.
  • 26-July-2019

    English

    Digital Government Review of Panama - Enhancing the Digital Transformation of the Public Sector

    This review explores how Panama can enhance and harness digital government to achieve broader strategic goals at both national and local levels. It looks at institutional governance, legislation, and inter-departmental co-ordination, including institutional capacities and skills for delivering quality public services. It identifies opportunities for making public service delivery more efficient and inclusive, as well as for expanding the strategic use of data. The review provides policy recommendations to help Panama enable and sustain the digital transformation of the public sector.
  • 25-July-2019

    English

    Recent Trends in International Migration of Doctors, Nurses and Medical Students

    This report describes recent trends in the international migration of doctors and nurses in OECD countries. Over the past decade, the number of doctors and nurses has increased in many OECD countries, and foreign-born and foreign-trained doctors and nurses have contributed to a significant extent. New in-depth analysis of the internationalisation of medical education shows that in some countries (e.g. Israel, Norway, Sweden and the United States) a large and growing number of foreign-trained doctors are people born in these countries who obtained their first medical degree abroad before coming back. The report includes four case studies on the internationalisation of medical education in Europe (France, Ireland, Poland and Romania) as well as a case study on the integration of foreign-trained doctors in Canada.
  • 24-July-2019

    English

    Revenue Statistics in Asian and Pacific Economies 2019

    Revenue Statistics in Asian and Pacific Economies is jointly produced by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD)’s Centre for Tax Policy and Administration (CTP) and the OECD Development Centre (DEV) with the co-operation of the Asian Development Bank (ADB), the Pacific Island Tax Administrators Association (PITAA), and the Pacific Community (SPC) and the financial support of the European Union and the government of Japan. It compiles comparable tax revenue statistics for Australia, Cook Islands, Fiji, Indonesia, Japan, Kazakhstan, Korea, Malaysia, New Zealand, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Samoa, Singapore, Solomon Islands, Thailand, Tokelau and Vanuatu and comparable non-tax revenue statistics for the Cook Islands, Papua New Guinea, Samoa, Tokelau and Vanuatu. The model is the OECD Revenue Statistics database which is a fundamental reference, backed by a well-established methodology, for OECD member countries. Extending the OECD methodology to Asian and Pacific economies enables comparisons about tax levels and tax structures on a consistent basis, both among Asian and Pacific economies and with OECD, Latin American and Caribbean and African averages.
  • 24-July-2019

    English

    OECD Economic Surveys: Malaysia 2019

    Malaysia’s economy is doing well, but social and governance challenges must be addressed. The new government prioritises inclusive growth and improving trust in public institutions. Further progress towards the planned target of high-income country status by 2024 will also require focusing on productivity growth with structural reforms to move up the value chain and improve skills. Ensuring environmental protection will improve the quality of growth.Growth is set to moderate in the near term, mainly due to slowing global trade. The rising cost of living has been a source of concern for large segments of the population. Progress could be made by providing a more targeted support, boosting entrepreneurship, improving productivity and employability among the low-income households.Fiscal policy needs reform. Building up fiscal space and ensuring medium-term sustainability will require increasing the low level of tax revenue. Improving budget process transparency and strengthening public debt management are key to fiscal accountability.Human capital development is needed to boost productivity and promote inclusive growth. Labour market imbalances hinder productivity and make it more difficult to climb up the value chain. Investment in education and training would help under-qualified workers. Policies to stimulate the demand for high-level skills would support those who are over-qualified.SPECIAL FEATURE: REDUCING SKILLS IMBALANCES TO FOSTER PRODUCTIVITY GROWTH
  • 24-July-2019

    English

    The Role of Gas in Today’s Energy Transitions

    This World Energy Outlook special report examines the role of fuel switching, primarily from coal to natural gas, to reduce emissions of carbon dioxide and air pollutants. Four case studies, covering the United States, the European Union, the People’s Republic of China, and India, reveal the various opportunities, hurdles and limits of fuel switching as a way to address environmental challenges.
  • 24-July-2019

    English

    Energy Security in ASEAN +6

    The ASEAN+6 group comprises the ten countries of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) and six other countries in the Asia-Pacific region: Australia, the People’s Republic of China ('China'), India, Japan, Korea and New Zealand. This group includes the world’s fastest-growing and most dynamic energy consumption centres. They are led by China, India and ASEAN, the emerging Asian economies, whose share of global energy demand is expected to reach 40% by 2040, up from only 20% in 2000.Energy demand in the ASEAN+6 countries is set to take diverse paths. In India, for example, low per capita energy use and a high population growth rate indicate the potential for substantial energy demand growth. In Japan, by contrast, a declining population and increasing energy efficiencies are contributing to a continuous fall in energy consumption. Countries of the region also differ in their natural resource wealth and their levels of socio-economic and technological development.These countries share common challenges, however, in ensuring the security of their energy supplies. Given their shared geographical location, they could help one another meet these energy security challenges by deepening regional co-operation.This report starts by giving an overview of the energy security issues of the region. Subsequent chapters cover the key energy sectors of oil, natural gas and electricity. They identify the main energy security issues, including a high level of vulnerability to natural disasters and heavy dependence on imports of fossil fuels, which must pass through major global chokepoints. The report provides policy advice, primarily for the region’s developing countries, based on the emergency response systems and accumulated experience in energy security of the International Energy Agency and its member countries.
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