Publications


  • 18-April-2016

    English

    Trade in Counterfeit and Pirated Goods - Mapping the Economic Impact

    Counterfeit and pirated products come from many economies, with China appearing as the single largest producing market. These illegal products are frequently found in a range of industries, from luxury items (e.g. fashion apparel or deluxe watches), via intermediary products (such as machines, spare parts or chemicals) to consumer goods that have an impact on personal health and safety (such as pharmaceuticals, food and drink, medical equipment, or toys). This report assess the quantitative value, scope and trends of this illegal trade.
  • 18-April-2016

    English

    Illicit Trade - Converging Criminal Networks

    This report assesses the magnitude, flows and drivers of illicit trade and the illegal economy including: narcotics, human trafficking, wildlife, sports betting, counterfeit medicines, alcohol and tobacco. The negative socio-economic impacts that these markets have in consumer countries are as worrisome as the goverance gaps that are exploited in source countries. This report examines each illicit sector in terms of the geographic sources, destinations and key trade routes, the current trend of infiltration by organized crime networks, and good practices or future policy solutions with which to combat illicit trade within the various sectors.
  • 14-April-2016

    English

    Thailand Electricity Security Assessment

    Thailand’s remarkable social and economic development since the 1970s has resulted in a steep and steady
    increase in energy consumption and, as a consequence, a rising dependency on imported fuels and associated
    exposure to international commodity prices. Electricity demand is currently concentrated in the Bangkok
    metropolitan area and driven by a large industrial and manufacturing base and significant amounts of tourism.
    But Thailand is a growing country with a large middle class, and a structural transition may change the nature
    and shape of electricity demand.Thai energy policy is driven by three pillars: security, affordability and environmental sustainability. Concerns
    about fuel diversity underlie all three pillars and as a result are major factors in long-term plans for power
    generation. Thailand’s electricity sector is at a turning point similar to that of many International Energy Agency
    (IEA) member countries, as it transitions to low-carbon power sources. Thailand must decide how to finance
    massive investments in new generation assets, transmission and distribution networks, as well as the steps to
    improve system operations and scale up energy efficiency.Partner Country Series – Thailand Electricity Security Assessment 2016 analyses the challenges the country faces,
    including how regulatory and market arrangements can adapt to best realise the opportunities from potentially
    disruptive distributed resources like wind and solar photovoltaics. This study draws on IEA member countries’
    experiences as well as Agency analysis to recommend policy improvements for a more secure and sustainable
    electricity sector in Thailand.
  • 14-April-2016

    English

    China's Engagement in Global Energy Governance

    The world’s largest energy consumer and producer as well as the top oil importer and carbon dioxide emitter,
    the People’s Republic of China is in the centre of the global energy landscape – and at a turning point towards a
    low-carbon future. There is an increasingly clear congruence of China’s domestic interests and the world’s
    collective interests in terms of energy security, economic development and sustainable growth. In global energy
    governance, the country is gradually transforming from outsider to insider and from follower to influencer, with
    instrumental implications for the country and the world. This book provides a historical perspective on China’s
    approach to global energy governance and highlights how greater positive and constructive Chinese
    engagement can be a step towards a better energy future for all.
  • 13-April-2016

    English

    Sustainable Business Models for Water Supply and Sanitation in Small Towns and Rural Settlements in Kazakhstan

    This report assesses the Republic of Kazakhstan’s significant efforts to improve water supply and sanitation (WSS) services over the past 15 years, notably in terms of ambitious target-setting, implementation of a sound water tariff policy, and significant investment in the rehabilitation and development of relevant infrastructure. Generally speaking, the absence of updated data on WSS institutional development is a limiting factor for further policy and programme development in the field, including in Kazakhstan. The monitoring and evaluation system proposed in this report aims to help assess progress in the WSS sector and serve as a basis for any necessary corrective measures.
  • 13-April-2016

    English

    Environmental Lending in EU Eastern Partnership Countries

    This report presents an overview of existing environmental credit lines in the EU’s Eastern Partnership (EaP) countries (Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Georgia, Moldova and Ukraine), which are mostly supported by International Finance Institutions and donors and disbursed by local commercial banks. Lessons learned from this type of credit-line implementation provide useful insights for spurring the banking sector into financing green investments.
  • 12-April-2016

    English

    Governing Education in a Complex World

    What models of governance are effective in complex education systems? In all systems an increasing number of stakeholders are involved in designing, delivering and monitoring education. Like our societies, education systems are increasingly diverse regarding students, teachers and communities, as well as the values and identities we expect education to deliver. These trends have increased the complexity of education systems, leaving decision makers on all governance levels with the question of how to successfully manoeuvre in this highly dynamic policy area.
    Governing Education in a Complex World addresses key challenges involved in governing modern education systems, looking specifically at complexity, accountability, capacity building and strategic thinking. The publication brings together research from the OECD Secretariat and invited chapters from international scholars to provide a state of the art analysis and a fresh perspective on some of the most challenging issues facing educational systems today.
    Creating the open, dynamic and strategic governance systems necessary for governing complex systems is not easy. This volume challenges our traditional concepts of education governance through work on complexity, collaborative networks and decision-making. In doing so it sets the agenda for thinking about the inclusive and adaptable systems necessary for governing education in today’s world. The volume will be a useful resource for those interested in education governance and complexity, particularly policy-makers, education leaders, teachers and the education research community.
  • 11-April-2016

    English

    Japan: Boosting Growth and Well-being in an Ageing Society

    With 25 years of sluggish economic growth, Japan’s per capita income has fallen from a level matching the average of the top half of OECD countries in the early 1990s to 14% below that today. Weak growth, together with rapid population ageing, has driven public debt into uncharted territory. Revitalising growth is thus the top priority for the Japanese government. With the labour force shrinking more rapidly than the population, per capita output can only grow through improvements in labour productivity and labour force participation. Japan’s highly-skilled labour force and its technological leadership can help close the gap with leading OECD countries in per capita income. But broad-based structural reforms, as envisaged in the third arrow of Abenomics, are needed to allow these strengths to fully achieve their potential. The initial impact of Abenomics in 2013 was impressive, and the reform process needs to continue.
  • 11-April-2016

    English

    OECD Territorial Reviews: Japan 2016

    Japan is embarked on a demographic transition without precedent in human history: the population is both declining and ageing rapidly. This raises important questions about the country's future economic geography, as public policies will need both to respond to these shifts and also to shape them. Demographic change will have particularly important implications for the settlement pattern of the country, and this, in turn, will affect Japan's ability to sustain economic growth and the well-being of its citizens. This Review therefore focuses on the spatial implications of demographic change and the response of spatial policies to it, particularly as these interact with other policies aimed at sustaining the productivity growth that a 'super-ageing' Japan will need in order to maintain its future prosperity. The Japanese authorities have recently put in place a complex package of long-term spatial and structural policies aimed at meeting this challenge. Their experience should be of first-order interest to other OECD countries, as most face the prospect of rapid population ageing and many are also projected to experience significant population decline over the coming decades.
  • 11-April-2016

    English

    Protecting Consumers through Behavioural Insights - Regulating the Communications Market in Colombia

    This innovative book combines results from research conducted in Colombia about how communications services consumers make consumption choices with OECD expertise in regulatory policy, behavioural economics, and data analytics, in order to help improve the consumer protection regime in Colombia. It focuses on the types of incentives that should be provided to change both provider and user behaviour, and considers where appropriate regulatory interventions may be needed to ensure that these incentives are realised. This work supports the Communications Regulator of Colombia in redesigning its consumer protection regime. This effort has refocused the regulatory framework from 'protecting rights' towards making the market function best; this involves encouraging the providers to improve the quality of their services and rates offered in the market and to foster a better understanding of what is being offered and how. The book also makes specific recommendations on possible follow-up experiments to test some of the possible solutions to help communications services consumers better understand the information provided by service operators.
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