Publications


  • 6-June-2016

    English

    Nordic Energy Technology Perspectives 2016 - Cities, flexibility and pathways to carbon-neutrality

    Nordic Energy Technology Perspectives 2016 presents a clear technological and economical pathway for the Nordic region towards a nearly carbon-neutral energy system in 2050. Nordic countries’ success can send a strong signal to the global community that the ambitions of the Paris Agreement from COP21 are achievable.The report identifies opportunities for policy makers and the private sector in three strategic areas:1. Incentivise and plan for a significantly more distributed, flexible and interconnected Nordic electricity system. A decentralised electricity supply with a high share of wind is likely to achieve a carbon-neutral system at lower cost than a system reliant on nuclear and thermal generation. But the shift will require flexibility measures beyond those now provided by Nordic hydropower, as well as a significant increase in cross-border electricity trade.2. Ramp up technologies to decarbonise energy-intensive industries and long-distance transport. Emissions from industries like steel and cement are the most challenging to reduce, requiring rapid advances in the demonstration and deployment of carbon capture and storage (CCS) and other innovative technologies. Electrification will be at the core of most low-carbon transportation, but long-distance transport will likely require large volumes of biofuels.3. Tap into cities’ positive momentum to strengthen national decarbonisation and enhance energy efficiency in transport and buildings. Driven in part by air quality, health and congestion objectives, many Nordic cities lead their countries’ decarbonisation efforts, with more ambitious targets and advanced roll-out of electric vehicles.
  • 1-June-2016

    English

    Promoting Productivity for Inclusive Growth in Latin America

    After a period of relatively robust growth that has allowed tens of millions of poorer households to join the global middle class, growth in Latin America has slowed recently, partly as a result of external factors. To close the still large gaps in living standards in relation to advanced economies, the region needs to significantly raise productivity growth while making sure that everybody has the opportunity to benefit from it. This will require comprehensive structural reforms, supported by a pro-productivity policy framework that incorporates social inclusion considerations from the outset.
  • 31-May-2016

    English

    Green Investment Banks - Scaling up Private Investment in Low-carbon, Climate-resilient Infrastructure

    This report provides the first comprehensive study of publicly capitalised green investment banks (GIBs), analysing the rationales, mandates and financing activities of this relatively new category of public financial institution. Based on the experience of over a dozen GIBs and GIB-like entities, the report provides a non-prescriptive stock-taking of the diverse ways in which these public institutions are catalysing private investment in low-carbon, climate-resilient infrastructure and other green sectors, with a spotlight on energy efficiency projects. The report also provides practical information to policy makers on how green investment banks are being set up, capitalised and staffed.
  • 31-May-2016

    English

    The Governance of Inclusive Growth

    Public governance can make a broad-based contribution to sound, sustainable and inclusive growth. Aligning public governance tools and processes with the broader objectives of policy making for inclusive growth can help governments deal with the complexities that go hand-in-hand with reconciling growth and inclusiveness. These complexities include setting out a vision, ensuring that policies complement each other and that different parts of government work together towards common goals, and engaging stakeholders to improve effectiveness, delivery and inclusion. After describing the OECD approach to inclusive growth, the report discusses which public governance principles, tools and arrangements can be used, and when, to enable a whole-of-government shift towards inclusive growth.
  • 25-May-2016

    English

    Netherlands 2016 - Foundations for the Future

    How can the Netherlands move its school system 'from good to great'? This report draws on international experience to look at ways in which the strong Dutch school system might go further still on the path to excellence. Clearly the Dutch school system is one of the best in the OECD, as measured by PISA and PIAAC and is also equitable, with a very low proportion of poor performers. The report therefore proposes an incremental approach to reform, building on strengths while responding to some emerging challenges. The Netherlands should strengthen the quality of early childhood education and care, revisit policies related to early tracking with more objective testing and track decisions, and enhance the permeability of the system. It should develop the professionalism of teachers and school leaders through enhanced collective learning and working, while at the same time strengthening accountability and capacity in school boards. This report will be valuable not only for the Netherlands, but also to the many other education systems looking to raise their performance who are interested in the example of the Netherlands.
  • 24-May-2016

    English

    Energy Policies of IEA Countries: Portugal 2016

    Despite the difficult economic climate, Portugal has continued to develop and reform its energy policies since the previous International Energy Agency (IEA) in-depth review in 2009. These changes have resulted in greater economic activity in the energy sector, increased renewable energy deployment, further market liberalisation and greater emphasis on energy efficiency in policy making.A new strategy emphasising renewable energy and energy efficiency has focused efforts on meeting national and European energy policy objectives, as Portugal seeks also to lower investment costs and greater national competitiveness. The new strategy includes proposals to reinforce interconnections with transnational European electricity and natural gas networks, and measures to promote economic and environmental sustainability. The strategy should accommodate regular independent reviews and monitoring tools to examine implementation of energy policy to ensure that it remains relevant and cost-effective.Following the economic crisis, Portugal was left with a substantial tariff deficit as retail electricity tariffs were set below costs, including subsidies to renewables. Portugal’s plan to address the tariff deficit was the outcome of a negotiation process with industry stakeholders. Eliminating the tariff debt by 2020 is a significant challenge. The government must ensure swift implementation of all reform proposals and continue its efforts to identify further potential cost-saving measures in the energy sector.This review analyses the energy policy challenges facing Portugal and provides recommendations for further policy improvements. It is intended to help guide the country towards a more secure and sustainable energy future.
  • 21-May-2016

    English

    Digital Government in Chile - Strengthening the Institutional and Governance Framework

    This review analyses the governance and institutional framework of digital government in Chile. It is based on the OECD Recommendation on Digital Government Strategies. It first benchmarks the institutional arrangements of ten advanced countries in the field of digital government, assessing their strategies, digital government units or bodies and policy levers, as well as the co-ordination mechanisms in place. The review then provides an in-depth look at the institutional set-up of digital government in Chile. The assessment reveals that the governance of digital government in Chile would benefit from a stronger legal basis, providing the unit leading the work on digital government with a better grounding and the necessary levers to drive the digital transformation of government and public services. Based on this analysis, the OECD advances two alternative recommendations to strengthen the institutional framework of digital government to foster public sector productivity, enhance efficiencies and improve service delivery. The strengths and weaknesses of the alternatives discussed in detail. The review includes a roadmap for the implementation of both alternatives. 
  • 20-May-2016

    English

    Inclusive Business Creation - Good Practice Compendium

    This compendium contains 20 case studies of public programmes in European countries that are successfully supporting business creation by people from disadvantaged and under-represented groups in entrepreneurship. The populations targeted by these programmes include youth, women, seniors, the unemployed, immigrants, ethnic minorities and people with disabilities. Each programme description details the programme’s activities and approach, assesses the challenges faced in development and implementation, and offers tips for successful transfer to other contexts.
     
    Public policy actions at national, regional and local levels can make an important contribution to economic growth and social inclusion by promoting business creation and self-employment by people who otherwise could remain outside of the mainstream of entrepreneurship. This compendium demonstrates that workable approaches exist and can help policy makers learn from each other's experiences to achieve widespread results.
  • 19-May-2016

    English

    Education in Latvia

    How can Latvia improve the quality and equity of its education system and realise long-term efficiency gains? This report covers the whole education system from early childhood education and care to tertiary education and provides an assessment of Latvia’s policies and practices against the best approaches in education and skills across the OECD. This international comparison brings to the fore the many strengths of Latvia’s education system, but also highlights the challenges it faces and provides a number of recommendations in response. This report will be of value to Latvia but also policy makers in other countries looking to raise the quality, equity and efficiency of their education systems.
  • 19-May-2016

    English

    Technology Collaboration Programmes - Highlights and outcomes

    Accelerating energy technology innovation is crucial to meet energy and climate goals, to support economic growth and to enhance energy security. Successful development and deployment of innovative energy technologies requires that stakeholders from both the public and private sector share knowledge, work collaboratively and, where appropriate, pool resources to deliver integrated, cost effective solutions to common challenges.Four decades ago, the founders of the IEA had the foresight to create a multilateral technology collaboration mechanism – the IEA Implementing Agreements (IAs) – that has withstood the test of time and today is more relevant than ever to delivering solutions to global energy challenges. This network of experts produced a range of noteworthy results, including inventions, pilot plants, demonstration projects, databases and development of standards. The year 2015 marked the 40th anniversary of the mechanism as well as the rebranding of the IAs as Technology Collaboration Programmes (TCPs).This publication provides an overview of the activities and recent accomplishments of TCPs. The 39 TCPs operating today involve about 6 000 experts from government, industry and research organisations in 51 countries around the world. Participants in TCPs have examined more than 1 900 energy-related topics in the areas of energy efficiency, renewable energy, fossil fuels, fusion power and cross-cutting issues.The unrivalled breadth and coverage of analytical expertise seen in TCPs are unique assets that will underpin for the years to come IEA efforts to support innovation for energy security, economic growth and environmental protection.
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