Publications


  • 4-April-2018

    English

  • 4-April-2018

    English

  • 4-April-2018

    English

    Getting Skills Right: Chile

    This study analyses the relationship between skills and labour market outcomes in Chile with a specific focus on disadvantaged groups: youth, women and the low-skilled. It examines the proficiency of the Chilean population in literacy, numeracy and problem solving in a technological-rich environment and disentangles the relationship between proficiency and labour market outcomes in Chile. The study also devotes significant attention to the demand for skills, by describing the use of skills at work in Chile and identifying its key determinants, as well as assessing the extent of skills mismatch and its implications for individuals. Throughout the study, differences between sociodemographic groups are highlighted to investigate the roots of labour market disadvantage.
  • 4-April-2018

    English

  • 4-April-2018

    English

  • 4-April-2018

    English

    Labor Migration in Asia: Increasing the Development Impact of Migration through Finance and Technology

    This report documents the increase in labor migration in Asia and looks at how finance and technology can aid its positive impact on home countries. As diasporas increase, governments have reached out to citizens abroad to provide them with financial instruments. Remittance channels have long been consolidated, but financial technology is changing the ways in which migrants remit—reducing fees and opening opportunities for new actors. One occupation driving labor migration, and incurring its own challenges, is work in information technology (IT). This report examines some of the latest developments in financial products and technology aimed at labor migrants from and in Asia, and discerns the factors determining the success of mobile IT workers from India. The four chapters in this report draw on issues raised and discussed during the Seventh Roundtable on Labor Migration in Asia: Finance and Technology to Increase the Positive Impact of Migration on Home Countries, held in Manila on 18–19 January 2017. The event brought together regional experts and policy makers and was co-organized by the Asian Development Bank Institute, the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, the International Labour Organization, and the Asian Development Bank.
    The report’s introductory chapter reviews recent regional migration trends. Two statistical annexes provide an overview of migration flows within Asia and between Asia and other regions.
  • 2-April-2018

    English

    OECD Skills Strategy Diagnostic Report: Italy 2017

    Italy needs to take prompt action to bolster growth and improve people’s skills across the country. As our economies adapt to globalisation, technological and demographic change, the demand for new and higher levels of skills increases. Yet Italy is struggling more than other advanced economies to meet these changing demands. Italy has launched a number of ambitious reforms to boost growth. But the reforms need to fully implement to ensure that schools, universities and workplaces equip all Italians with the skills needed for success in the economy and society.The OECD Skills Strategy Diagnostic Report makes a number of recommendations that will help sustain this positive momentum including, among others, to:
    • Implement the Alternanza Scuola Lavoro (ASL) by training school principals and teachers to effectively engage employers in the design of work-based learning activities and increase incentives for firms to hire trainees.
    • Expand and improve the quality of professional tertiary education institutions (ITS).
    • Increase overall investment in tertiary education
    • Subsidise training programmes that target low-skilled adults who often face difficulties in accessing such opportunities.
    • Increase public and private investment in skills and improve how they are allocated through monitoring and evaluation.
    • Improve the governance system to ensure that skills polices are aligned and coordinated.
  • 29-March-2018

    English

    OECD Economic Surveys: Tunisia 2018 - Economic Assessment

    Tunisia has experienced strong economic and social progress in recent decades and, more recently, a successful democratic transition. The convergence process has slowed down, however, due to the low level of investment since the early 2000s, while regional and labour market inequalities have persisted. Since 2011, the external and public debt-to-GDP ratios have risen sharply. To put them back on a sustainable path, structural reforms that can sustain growth and competitiveness are needed. In order to boost business investment, regulatory and administrative constraints - including the many licences, permissions to operate and administrative authorisations, pricing constraints and restrictions on competition in certain sectors - need to be reduced. Strengthening Tunisia's competitiveness in global value chains through trade facilitation measures and greater efficiency of logistics services is also key. Encouraging women's participation in the labour market, adapting training to the needs of employers and reducing social security contributions on payroll will help create quality jobs. A new regional development policy, emphasising the specific assets of each region around the development of urban centres, is needed.SPECIAL FEATURES: INVESTMENT; EMPLOYMENT AND REGIONAL DEVELOPMENT
  • 28-March-2018

    English

    How Immigrants Contribute to Rwanda's Economy

    Immigrants' contribution to Rwanda's economy is relatively small, but growing. Unlike in many other developing countries, immigrants in Rwanda are on average better educated and work in more productive sectors than the native-born population. Although immigration is associated with a small reduction in the employment rate of the native-born population, immigrants' contribution to the Rwandan gross domestic product is higher than their share in employment. In addition, immigrants contribute more in taxes than they receive in government benefits, leading to a positive effect on the fiscal balance. A mix of migration policies, aimed at meeting labour market needs and fostering immigrants’ integration, and non-migration policies, intending to leverage the impact of immigration on the economy, would help enhance the contribution of immigrants to Rwanda’s economy.
     
    How Immigrants Contribute to Rwanda’s Economy is the result of a project carried out by the OECD Development Centre and the International Labour Organization, with support from the European Union. The project aimed to analyse several economic impacts – on the labour market, economic growth, and public finance – of immigration in ten partner countries: Argentina, Costa Rica, Côte d'Ivoire, the Dominican Republic, Ghana, Kyrgyzstan, Nepal, Rwanda, South Africa and Thailand. The empirical evidence stems from a combination of quantitative and qualitative analyses of secondary, and in some cases primary, data sources.
  • 28-March-2018

    English

    State-of-the-art Report on the Progress of Nuclear Fuel Cycle Chemistry

    The implementation of advanced nuclear systems requires that new technologies associated with the back end of the fuel cycle are developed. The separation of minor actinides from other fuel components is one of the advanced concepts being studied to help close the nuclear fuel cycle and to improve the long-term effects on the performance of geological repositories. Separating spent fuel elements and subsequently converting them through transmutation into short-lived nuclides should considerably reduce the longterm risks associated with nuclear power generation.
    R&D programmes worldwide are attempting to address such challenges, and many processes for advanced reprocessing and partitioning minor actinides are being developed. This report provides a comprehensive overview of progress on separation chemistry processes, and in particular on the technologies associated with the separation and recovery of minor actinides for recycling so as to help move towards the implementation of advanced fuel cycles. The report examines both aqueous and pyro processes, as well as the status of current and proposed technologies described according to the hierarchy of separations targeting different fuel components. The process criteria that will affect technology downselection are also reviewed, as are non-proliferation requirements. The maturity of different reprocessing techniques are assessed using a scale based on the technology readiness level, and perspectives for future R&D are reviewed.
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