Publications


  • 5-October-2016

    English

    Weaving Together Policies for Social Inclusion in Ireland

    Ireland has made considerable progress in rebounding from the crisis, but, like other OECD countries, continues to grapple with how to address lingering socio-economic impacts and ensure inclusive growth growing forward. Multi-faceted interventions, targeting disadvantaged populations and the places they live, can lead to more effective and inclusive policies. Ignoring the relationship between people and place will, in contrast, lead to further entrenched disadvantage. This report looks at some of the ways in which Ireland can build on an already comprehensive series of reforms to better weave together current policies and practices.

  • 3-October-2016

    English

    Strengthening governance and competitiveness in the MENA region for stronger and more inclusive growth

    The MENA region registered relatively dynamic economic growth and investment rates during the first decade of the century, even during the global economic and financial crisis. This was helped by important reforms by many governments to increase economic openness, diversification, private sector development and institutional reform. The participation of Tunisia and Jordan in the Open Government Partnership, the massive investment in infrastructure by Morocco and Egypt to increase connectivity and improve participation in global trade, and the efforts of the United Arab Emirates to diversify its economy demonstrate the great potential of the region to achieve progress. However, recent political instability and security threats have considerably slowed economic prospects. Reforms have not succeeded in tackling deeper structural challenges, such as corruption, unemployment, uneven development and unequal opportunities, especially for disadvantaged regions, women and youth. Appropriate policy responses are needed to regain stability and lay the foundations for a more open economy and a more inclusive development model. While the MENA region is profoundly heterogeneous, there are significant common economic and institutional trends that support the need for more concerted action to exploit the immense potential of the region and ensure its fruitful integration into the global economy.

  • 3-October-2016

    English

    Zero Road Deaths and Serious Injuries - Leading a Paradigm Shift to a Safe System

    This report describes a paradigm shift in road safety policy, being led by a handful of countries, according to the principles of a Safe System. A Safe System is based on the premise that road crashes are both predictable and preventable, and that it is possible to move towards zero road deaths and serious injuries. This, however, requires a fundamental rethink of the governance and implementation of road safety policy.
    To stem the road death epidemic, the United Nations have set the target of halving traffic fatalities by 2020. Every year, 1.25 million people are killed in road crashes and up to 50 million are seriously injured. Road crashes kill more people than malaria or tuberculosis and are among the ten leading causes of death. Their economic cost is estimated at 2-5% of GDP in many countries. Written by a group of international road safety experts, this report provides leaders in government, administrations, business and academia with emerging best practices and the starting point to chart their own journeys towards a Safe System.
     

  • 3-October-2016

    English

    Oil, Gas, Coal and Electricity - Volume 2016 Issue 4

    This publication provides detailed and up-to-date quarterly statistics on oil, natural gas, coal and electricity for the OECD countries. Oil statistics cover production, trade, refinery intake and output, stock changes and consumption for crude oil, NGL and nine selected product groups. Statistics for electricity, natural gas and coal show supply and trade. Oil and coal import and export data are reported by origin and destination. Gas imports and exports data are reported by entries and exits of physical flows. Moreover, oil and hard coal production are reported on a worldwide basis.

  • 30-September-2016

    English

    Clean Energy Technology Assessment Methodology Pilot Study: Morocco

    To reduce its heavy dependence on imported fossil fuels, achieve its ambitious climate goals and meet growing energy demand, the Moroccan government has launched a comprehensive plan to increase the share of renewable energy and improve energy efficiency. It set a target of 42% of its installed electricity generation capacity to come from renewable sources, with the goal rising to 52% by 2030. At the same time, Morocco aims to reduce its energy consumption by 12% by 2020, and 15% by 2030 through increased energy efficiency.

    Due to the country’s determination to increase energy efficiency and its supportive policy environment, the IEA selected Morocco for a pilot study of the new Clean Energy Technology Assessment Methodology (CETAM). This methodology, developed with the European Bank of Reconstruction and Development (EBRD), aims to provide clear, transparent information about clean energy technology markets in emerging economies. The goal is to identify the most promising clean energy technologies for policy support and investment and to establish metrics for tracking their deployment over time.

    Morocco has an abundance of renewable resources, especially wind and solar power, and is a regional leader in deploying clean energy technologies. This report assesses the range of technological options on both the demand and supply side to determine which show the most potential for further development, in line with the country’s policy goals and resource endowment.

  • 30-September-2016

    English

    Clean Energy Technology Assessment Methodology Pilot Study: Belarus

    Belarus, like many countries around the world, faces the challenge of diversifying its energy mix and enhancing its energy security while also reducing greenhouse gas emissions. One of its priorities is to lower its heavy reliance on natural gas imports from Russia by producing more low-emission energy domestically, including renewable and nuclear power. And while Belarus has managed to decouple energy demand from economic growth, a big potential remains for improved energy efficiency due to the country’s inefficient Soviet-era infrastructure and insufficient investments in energy.

    Thanks to a favourable regulatory environment and a promising potential for renewables, the IEA selected Belarus for a pilot study for the Clean Energy Technology Assessment Methodology (CETAM). This methodology, developed with the European Bank of Reconstruction and Development (EBRD), aims to provide clear, transparent information about clean energy technology markets in emerging economies. The programme’s goal is to identify the most promising technologies for policy support and investment and to establish metrics for tracking their deployment over time.

    This report assesses the range of technological options in Belarus on both the demand and supply side to determine which show the most potential for further development, in line with the country’s policy goals and resource endowment. Appropriate policies and measures that support a well-functioning market for the development of local renewable sources would help the government reach its energy security targets and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Closer monitoring of priority energy efficiency technologies would allow Belarus to implement planned measures more effectively and optimise its energy savings potential.

  • 30-September-2016

    English

    Clean Energy Technology Assessment Methodology Pilot Study: Kazakhstan

    Oil exports play a major role in the economic development of Kazakhstan, the largest petroleum producer in Central Asia. But the country’s vast plains also hold significant renewable energy potential that remains largely untouched, particularly solar and wind power. This major potential could help the country reach its ambitious goals of diversifying most of its electricity generation away from coal use while cutting harmful greenhouse gas emissions. Improving the country’s ageing Soviet-era infrastructure also holds significant promise for advancing energy efficiency.

    The International Energy Agency selected Kazakhstan as a key player in regional efforts to deploy low carbon technologies in Central Asia for a pilot study developed with the European Bank of Reconstruction and Development. This Clean Energy Technology Assessment Methodology programme aims to provide clear and transparent information about renewable energy and energy efficiency technology markets, with the goal of identifying the most promising technologies for policy support and investment and establishing metrics for tracking their deployment over time.

    This report assesses a range of technological options in Kazakhstan on both the demand and supply side to determine which show the most potential for further development, in line with the country’s policy goals and resource endowment. Appropriate policies and measures that support effective renewables deployment and grid integration would help Kazakhstan reach its diversification targets sooner. Phasing-out of energy subsidies and developing in-depth monitoring indicators would allow the country to better track the implementation of planned energy efficiency measures and optimise its energy savings potential.

  • 30-September-2016

    English

    Energy Policies of IEA Countries: Japan 2016

    One of the largest economies in the world, Japan has long been a major consumer and importer of energy and a recognised leader in energy technology development. Japan’s energy policy has been dominated in recent years by its efforts to overcome the fallout from the 2011 earthquake and the subsequent Fukushima nuclear accident. One consequence of the accident was a gradual shutdown of all nuclear power plants, which has led to a significant rise in fossil fuels use, increased fuel imports and rising carbon dioxide emissions. It has also brought electricity prices to unsustainable levels.

    Faced with these challenges, the government of Japan has revised its energy policy in recent years to focus on further diversifying its energy mix (less use of fossil fuels, more reliance on renewable energy, restarting nuclear plants when declared safe) and curbing carbon emissions. Building on these plans, Japan has outlined ambitious goals to cut greenhouse gas emissions by 26% between 2013 and 2030.

    This emissions reduction commitment requires a balancing act between energy security, economic efficiency, environmental protection and safety. This International Energy Agency (IEA) review of Japan’s policies highlights three areas that are critical to its success: energy efficiency, increasing renewable energy supply and restarting nuclear power generation. The IEA encourages Japan to increase low-carbon sources of power supply. It also recognises that nuclear power can only be restored provided that the highest safety standards are met and the critical issues following the Fukushima accident are addressed, including decontaminating areas affected by the radioactive release and regaining public trust.

    This review analyses the energy policy challenges facing Japan and provides recommendations for further policy improvements. It is intended to help guide the country towards a more secure, sustainable and affordable energy future.

  • 30-September-2016

    English

    Evaluation Systems in Development Co-operation - 2016 Review

    Evaluation is widely recognised as an important component for learning and improving development effectiveness. Evaluation responds to public and taxpayer demands for credible information and independent assessment of development co-operation activities. The Development Assistance Committee’s Network on Development Evaluation supports members in their efforts to strengthen and continuously improve evaluation systems.

    The 2016 review of evaluation systems in development co-operation looks at the changes and trends in evaluation systems over the last five years. The report describes the role and management of evaluation in development agencies, ministries and multilateral banks. It provides information about the specific institutional settings, resources, policies and practices of DAC Evaluation Network members, and includes specific profiles on each member’s evaluation system. The study identifies major trends and current challenges in development evaluation. It covers issues such as human and financial resources, institutional setups and policies, independence of the evaluation function, reporting and use of evaluation findings, joint evaluation, and the involvement of partner countries in evaluation work.

    This report is part of the DAC Network on Development Evaluation’s ongoing efforts to increase the effectiveness of development co-operation policies and programmes by promoting high-quality, independent evaluation.

  • 29-September-2016

    English

    Supreme Audit Institutions and Good Governance - Oversight, Insight and Foresight

    This report maps the activities of ten leading Supreme Audit Institutions (SAIs) in Brazil, Canada, Chile, France, Korea, the Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, South Africa and the United States. In particular, it looks at how these SAIs assess key stages of the policy cycle as well as resulting policies and programmes. SAIs have untapped potential to go beyond their traditional oversight role and contribute evidence for more informed policy-making. The report provides examples and case studies of SAIs’ activities that consider and support the integration of international good practices into policy and programme formulation, implementation and evaluation. It provides guidance for SAIs seeking to engage in oversight, insight and foresight, taking into account the SAI’s internal strategy as well as policy challenges and actors in the external environment.

  • << < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 | 37 | 38 | 39 | 40 | 41 | 42 | 43 | 44 | 45 | 46 | 47 | 48 | 49 | 50 | 51 | 52 | 53 | 54 | 55 | 56 | 57 | 58 | 59 | 60 | 61 | 62 | 63 | 64 | 65 | 66 | 67 | 68 | 69 | 70 | 71 | 72 | 73 | 74 | 75 | 76 | 77 | 78 | 79 | 80 | 81 | 82 | 83 | 84 | 85 | 86 | 87 | 88 | 89 | 90 | 91 | 92 | 93 | 94 | 95 | 96 | 97 | 98 | 99 | 100 | 101 | 102 | 103 | 104 | 105 | 106 | 107 | 108 | 109 | 110 | 111 | 112 | 113 | 114 | 115 | 116 | 117 | 118 | 119 | 120 | 121 | 122 | 123 | 124 | 125 | 126 | 127 | 128 | 129 | 130 | 131 | 132 | 133 | 134 | 135 | 136 | 137 | 138 | 139 | 140 | 141 | 142 | 143 | 144 | 145 | 146 | 147 | 148 | 149 | 150 | 151 | 152 | 153 | 154 | 155 | 156 | 157 | 158 | 159 | 160 | 161 | 162 | 163 | 164 | 165 | 166 | 167 | 168 | 169 | 170 | 171 | 172 | 173 | 174 | 175 | 176 | 177 | 178 | 179 | 180 | 181 > >>