Publications


  • 9-October-2018

    English

    Good Regulatory Practices to Support Small and Medium Enterprises in Southeast Asia

    Small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) can find it challenging to cope and comply with regulations and adapt regulatory changes. Good regulatory practice (GRP) helps create a stable and enabling regulatory environment for investment, trade, and entrepreneurhsip, and thus supports healthy economies and regional competitiveness. This report is the first comprehensive stock-taking of GRP implementation in Southeast Asia to support local SMEs and their integration into global value chains. For each of the ten countries of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN), the report provides examples of GRP tools and approaches in areas such as administrative burden reduction, e-government, regulatory impact assessment, ex post evaluation, and stakeholder consultation. The report also includes an overview of collective efforts pursued at the ASEAN level to promote the GRP agenda across the region.
  • 8-October-2018

    English

    OECD Regions and Cities at a Glance 2018

    This report looks at how regions and cities across the OECD are progressing towards stronger economies, higher quality of life for their citizens and more inclusive societies. This edition presents regional and metropolitan updates for more than 40 indicators to assess disparities within countries and their evolution since the turn of the new millennium. The report covers all OECD countries and, where data is available, Brazil, People’s Republic of China, Colombia, Lithuania, Peru, the Russian Federation, Tunisia and South Africa.Three new features characterise this edition. First, an assessment migrant integration, based on new indicators produced for OECD regions. Second, recent trends on entrepreneurship in regions, with new indicators on creation and destruction of firms and on the jobs associated with such dynamics. Third, an assessment of socio-economic conditions, inequalities and poverty in metropolitan areas and their neighbourhoods.
  • 30-September-2018

    English

    Supporting Entrepreneurship and Innovation in Higher Education in The Netherlands

    The higher education sector in The Netherlands offers excellent examples of what it means to be innovative and entrepreneurial, and promote entrepreneurial mind sets, entrepreneurship and knowledge exchange. Creating value from academic knowledge through innovative services, products, processes and business models that meet economic, social and environmental needs lies at the core of this strategy. The current challenge is to strenghten the anchoring of value-creation processes in education and research. This can be achieved through increased interdisciplinarity, entrepreneurial mindset development across all subject areas, incentives for effective wider world engagement of researchers and students, and growth-oriented support for startups. This report presents an in-depth analysis of the policy framework and institutional practices and provides useful guidance for policy makers and university leaders across the world. HEInnovate is a joint initiative of the European Commission and the OECD to promote the innovative and entrepreneurial higher education institution.
  • 28-September-2018

    English

    Scientific Advice During Crises - Facilitating Transnational Co-operation and Exchange of Information

    This report looks at how scientific advice can best support crisis management during transnational crises, such as those provoked by natural hazards or pandemics. Scientific advice has an important role to play in all phases of the crisis management cycle - preparedness, response and recovery. It can be particularly valuable during the sense-making period when a crisis occurs and develops. However, this value is dependent on the quality and timeliness of the advice and most importantly its relevance to the decisions that crisis managers and policy-makers have to make during a crisis. Generating rigorous scientific advice requires access to relevant data, information and expertise, across scientific disciplines and across borders. Ensuring this advice is useful requires effective connections between scientific advisory processes and crisis management mechanisms, including at the international level.
  • 28-September-2018

    English

    Working Together for Local Integration of Migrants and Refugees in Paris

    Of the requests for asylum in France made in 2016, more than 10 000 applications were made by people in Paris and were made in the context of a rising number of refugees and asylum seekers since 2015. This increase has stirred a debate in France around its 'universal' migrant integration model, which aspires to equal treatment for all and for which the main tool has been 'Integration Contract' for migrants. At all levels of government, measures are now being designed for 'reinforced' support for migrants, helping them to better integrate socially and to better access the  job market; these measures are tailored for all persons with a residency permit, in particular for refugees. This case study examines the City of Paris and its ambitions to successfully integrate its new inhabitants. The municipality sets aside dedicated resources for this and actively involves French citizens in implementing activities to foster social cohesion. The city is still attracting new migrants while socio-economic disparities and segregation remain marked in Paris and its region, in a context of limited emergency accommodation facilities for migrants and a tight housing market. More can be done to improve coherence across levels of government and among partners, in order to prevent fragmented service delivery and to improve how the impact of integration programmes is measured.
  • 28-September-2018

    English

    Integrity in Political Finance in Greece

    Money in politics is a double-edged sword. It is a necessary component of the democratic process, enabling the expression of political support as well as allowing for competition in elections. Yet, if the financing of political parties and election campaigns are not adequately regulated and monitored, money may also be a means for powerful special interests to capture the policy process. This report provides an in-depth analysis of the political finance mechanisms in Greece, drawing on international standards and good practices. It provides concrete guidance on developing a solid legislative framework and an effective oversight mechanism for political finance. Finally, the report suggests ways to improve integrity in the short and medium term.
  • 27-September-2018

    English

    Open Government Data Report - Enhancing Policy Maturity for Sustainable Impact

    This report provides an in-depth overview of the state of open data policies across OECD member and partner countries, based on data collected through the OECD Open Government Data survey (2013, 2014, 2016/17), country reviews and comparative analysis. The report analyses open data policies using an analytical framework that is in line with the OECD OUR data Index and the International Open Data Charter. It assesses governments’ efforts to enhance the availability, accessibility and re-use of open government data. It makes the case that beyond countries’ commitment to open up good quality government data, the creation of public value requires engaging user communities from the entire ecosystem, such as journalists, civil society organisations, entrepreneurs, major tech private companies and academia. The report also underlines how open data policies are elements of broader digital transformations, and how public sector data policies require interaction with other public sector agendas such as open government, innovation, employment, integrity, public budgeting, sustainable development, urban mobility and transport. It stresses the relevance of measuring open data impacts in order to support the business case for open government data.
  • 25-September-2018

    English

    PISA for Development Assessment and Analytical Framework - Reading, Mathematics and Science

    'What is important for citizens to know and be able to do?' The OECD Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) seeks to answer that question through the most comprehensive and rigorous international assessment of student knowledge and skills. As more countries join its ranks, PISA is evolving to successfully cater for a larger and more diverse group of participants. The OECD launched the PISA for Development initiative in 2014 to support evidence-based policy making globally and offer universal tools in monitoring progress towards the Education Sustainable Development Goal. Spanning six years, this unique pilot project aims to make the assessment more accessible and relevant to a wider range of countries, while maintaining the overall PISA framework and accordance with PISA’s technical standards and usual practices.The PISA for Development Assessment and Analytical Framework presents the conceptual foundations of the project, and covers reading, mathematics and science. PISA for Development has a school-based component and an out-of-school one. For the school-based component, a questionnaire about students’ background is distributed to all participating students. School principals complete a school questionnaire that describes the school, its students and teachers, and the learning environment. Teachers also complete a questionnaire about themselves, the school’s resources, their teaching practice and their students. The out-of-school respondents complete a background questionnaire, and their parent (or person most knowledgeable about them) answers a questionnaire about the youth’s background and childhood experiences. A household observation questionnaire is completed by the interviewer, and information about the location of the household is collected by PISA for Development National Centres.Nine countries participated in the PISA for Development assessment: Bhutan, Cambodia, Ecuador, Guatemala, Honduras, Panama, Paraguay, Senegal and Zambia.
  • 24-September-2018

    English

    Indigenous Employment and Skills Strategies in Canada

    This report looks at a range of key labour market, economic and social indicators related to Canada’s growing Indigenous population, which comprises First Nations, Inuit and Métis. In 2016, there were over 1.6 million Indigenous People in Canada, accounting for 4.9% of the total population, which is a significant increase from 3.8% in 2006. The report looks at the implementation of the federal government’s Indigenous Skills and Employment Training Strategy through in-depth analysis across four case study areas, including 1) the Centre for Aboriginal Human Resources and Development in Winnipeg, Manitoba; 2) Community Futures Treaty Seven in Calgary, Alberta; 3) MAWIW Council in Fredericton, New Brunswick; and 4) Kiikenomaga Kikenjigewen Employment and Training Services (KKETS) in Thunder Bay, Ontario. The report highlights critical success factors to better link Indigenous People to high quality jobs while also providing recommendations regarding future labour market and skills programming for Indigenous People in Canada.
  • 21-September-2018

    English

    The Productivity-Inclusiveness Nexus

    Historically low productivity gains and record high inequality are major challenges for policy makers around the world. Both concerns have been exacerbated by the global financial crisis but took roots well before and reflect fundamental challenges with the way our economies function.
     
    This report proposes a new comprehensive approach to promote better productivity performance and reduce inequalities. It not only gathers the most recent empirical evidence on the main factors behind slowing productivity gains and rising or persisting inequalities but also suggests possible common foundations and linkages between these two trends. It stresses the risk of a vicious cycle setting in, where individuals with fewer skills and poorer access to opportunities are confined to unproductive and often precarious jobs. This reduces aggregate productivity and widens inequality. The report focuses on how to expand the productive assets of an economy by investing in the skills of its people and providing an environment where all firms have a fair chance to succeed, including in lagging regions. It draws preliminary conclusions on the type of policy packages that are needed and on their implications for policy making. It also sets an agenda for future research to deepen empirical evidence and make concrete country-specific policy recommendations.
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