Publications


  • 23-July-2010

    English

    Test No. 442A: Skin Sensitization - Local Lymph Node Assay: DA

    The Local Lymph Node Assay: DA (LLNA: DA) is a non-radioactive modification to the LLNA method for identifying potential skin sensitizing test substances and measuring the proliferation of lymphocytes they induce in the auricular lymph nodes. The method, described in mouse (CBA/J strain), is based on measurement of the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) content by bioluminescence as an indicator of this proliferation. A minimum of four animals is used per dose group, with a minimum of three concentrations of the test substance, plus a concurrent negative control group and, if appropriate, a positive control group. The experimental schedule is during 8 days. The time from animal sacrifice to measurement of ATP should not exceed 30 min. The procedure from excision of lymph nodes to ATP measurement should be kept uniform for each animal and completed within 20 minutes. The luciferin/luciferase method is applied to measure the bioluminescence in Relative Luminescence Units (RLU). This study includes: measurements (weighing, RLU), and clinical daily observations. The results are expressed as the Stimulation Index (SI) obtained by calculation. The SI should be ¡Ý1.8 before further evaluation of the test material as a potential skin sensitizer is warranted.
  • 23-July-2010

    English

    Test No. 223: Avian Acute Oral Toxicity Test

    This Test Guideline describes procedures designed to estimate the acute oral toxicity of substances to birds, and it provides three testing options: (1) limit dose test, (2) LD50-slope test, and (3) LD50-only test. The LD50-slope and LD50-only options are sequential testing procedures. The test method selected will depend on whether or not a definitive median dose (LD50) and slope of the dose-response curve are both needed. The limit dose test is the preferred test when toxicity is expected to be low and lethality is unlikely at the limit dose. The limit dose should be adequate for assessment purposes, and it is usually 2000 mg/kg-bwt. Five or ten birds are tested at the limit dose in addition to a control group. The LD50-slope test is the preferred test when regulatory or other requirements determine that the slope of the dose-response curve and/or the confidence interval is required in addition to an estimate of the LD50. This is a 3- or 4-stage test with 24 or 34 birds in addition to a control group. The LD50-only test is the preferred test when regulatory or other requirements determine that only the median lethal dose is required but neither the slope of the dose response curve or the confidence interval for the LD50 is required. This may be the appropriate test to estimate a percentile of a species sensitivity distribution of LD50s and to provide information for product labelling purposes. This test has two stages, with 14 birds in addition to a control group.Software to be used with TG 223. Click here. Software not part of the Mutual Acceptance of Data.
  • 23-July-2010

    English

    Poland: Key Issues and Policies

    The rapid growth of entrepreneurship and small firms has been one of the greatest successes in post-Communist transformation in Poland.  SMEs have greatly contributed to employment, investment and value added in the Polish economy.  However, key barriers to further growth remain in the business environment for SMEs and entrepreneurs.  This book sets out the current SME and entrepreneurship climate, reviews SME and entrepreneurship issues and policies at national and local levels, and provides observations and recommendations for improving and supporting entrepreneurship and SMEs in Poland.
  • 23-July-2010

    English

    Energy Policies of IEA Countries: France 2009

    The International Energy Agency's periodic review of France's energy policies and programmes.  This 2009 edition finds that the energy policy of France seeks to achieve a balance between the environmentally responsible production and use of energy, the growth and competitiveness of the economy, and secure and competitively priced energy and infrastructure. To meet these objectives, the French government in 2007 launched an impressive environmental programme, Grenelle de l’Environnement, which sets ambitious targets, particularly in the buildings and transport sectors. The government has also made commendable efforts in enhancing gas supply security and forwarding initiatives to expand infrastructure and interconnections with neighbouring countries. These efforts should make regional electricity and gas markets more stable and secure. In the nuclear power sector, France has created an independent Nuclear Safety Authority and established a comprehensive framework for managing all kinds of radioactive waste and materials.Notwithstanding its policy successes, France faces a number of challenges. Its targets aimed at combating climate change are very ambitious. While greenhouse gas emissions in France are lower than the average among IEA countries due to the important role in electricity generation of nuclear power, emissions in the transport and buildings sectors increased from 1990 to 2008. Effective implementation of the announced policies and measures will be imperative for meeting France’s international and national commitments. In the electricity sector, the co-existence of regulated tariffs and market prices may impede mobilising the investment needed for maintenance and life extensions of nuclear power plants. The country also needs to boost the flexibility of electricity networks in order to achieve a structural balance between base load generation and increasing demand for peak-load. This review analyses the energy challenges facing France and provides sectoral critiques and recommendations for further policy improvements.
  • 23-July-2010

    English

    Energy Policies of IEA Countries: Turkey 2009

    The International Energy Agency's periodic review of Turkey's energy policies and programmes.  This 2009 edition finds that Turkey will likely see the fastest medium to long-term growth in energy demand among the IEA member countries. It has a young and urbanising population and energy use is still comparatively low. Therefore, ensuring sufficient energy supply to a growing economy remains the government’s main energy policy concern. Turkey has also progressed significantly in all other areas of energy policy over the past few years. Large investments in energy infrastructure, especially in electricity and natural gas, are needed to avoid bottlenecks in supply and to sustain rapid economic growth. To attract that investment, the country needs to continue reforming its energy market. Power sector reform is well under way, but in the natural gas sector reform has been slower and needs to be accelerated.Improving energy efficiency is essential for responding to Turkey’s energy policy challenges, and considerable potential remains in all sectors. In a country where private cars are rapidly becoming more common and where significant new construction is foreseen, transport and buildings merit particular long-term attention from the decision makers. Energy-related CO2 emissions have more than doubled since 1990 and are likely to continue to increase rapidly over the medium and long term, in parallel with energy demand. The IEA urges Turkey to intensify efforts to further develop its approach concerning its post-2012 regime to combat climate change, and to consider setting a quantitative overall target for limiting emissions. This review analyses the broad range of energy challenges facing Turkey and provides critiques and recommendations for further policy improvements.  
  • 15-July-2010

    English

    United Kingdom: Policies for a Sustainable Recovery

    Drawing on the OECD’s expertise in comparing country experiences and identifying best practices, the Better Policies series tailors the OECD’s policy advice to the specific and timely priorities of member and partner countries, focusing on how governments can make reform happen.
  • 9-July-2010

    English

    Consumer Policy Toolkit

    The markets for goods and services have undergone significant changes over the past 20 years. Regulatory reform, global markets, new technologies and growth in the role of services in economic activity have driven the changes which, in many instances, have provided significant benefits to consumers. Relatively little attention has been paid to the challenges these developments have posed for consumers. More choice and more complexity in many markets have made it increasingly difficult for them to compare and assess the value of products and services. The challenges for consumers have raised similar challenges for the government authorities responsible for protecting them from unfair commercial practices and fraud.This book examines how markets have evolved and provides insights for improved consumer policy making. It explores, for the first time, how what we have learned through the study of behavioural economics is changing the way policy makers are addressing problems.
  • 7-July-2010

    English

    Peaches and Nectarines

    This book provides a series of standards regarding the quality, sizing, presentation, and marking of peaches and nectarines in international trade.   It comprises explanatory notes and illustrations to facilitate the common interpretation of the standard in force and is is published within the framework of the Scheme for the Application of International Standards for Fruit and Vegetables established by OECD in 1962. This edition illustrates the revised standard text and new trends in international trade; updates the quality requirements for peaches and defines the quality parameters for nectarines. It  therefore is a valuable tool for the inspection authorities, professional bodies and traders interested in the international trade in peaches and nectarines. 
  • 29-June-2010

    English

    OECD Review of Agricultural Policies: Israel 2010

    Israel’s agriculture is unique amongst developed countries in that land and water resources are nearly all state-owned and that agricultural production is dominated by co-operative communities. Israel is a world leader in agricultural technology, particularly in farming in arid conditions. This Review measures support provided to Israeli agriculture and evaluates the effectiveness of current agricultural policy measures. Israel has made progress in removing policies that distort trade, and resource allocation and support to agriculture is lower than the OECD average. However, the government still plays an important role. The report suggests further agricultural policy reforms to reduce costs for consumers and taxpayers and to improve the efficiency of current policy measures.A special focus of the report is the environmental performance of Israeli agriculture. This is already an issue with scarce land and water resources, accentuated by the overarching issue of climate change. The Review examines agriculture’s performance with respect to water resources and pollution, soils, biodiversity, air emissions and climate change. It concludes that strengthening policy coherence, especially in improving the management of water resources in agriculture, is important.
  • 23-June-2010

    English

    Nuclear Production of Hydrogen - Fourth Information Exchange Meeting, Oakbrook, Illinois, USA , 14-16 April 2009

    Hydrogen has the potential to play an important role as a sustainable and environmentally acceptable energy carrier in the 21st century. This report describes the scientific and technical challenges associated with the production of hydrogen using heat and/or electricity from nuclear power plants, with special emphasis on recent developments in high-temperature electrolysis and the use of different chemical thermodynamic processes. Economics and market analysis as well as safety aspects of the nuclear production of hydrogen are also discussed.
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