Publications


  • 4-November-2009

    English

    Competitive Interaction between Airports, Airlines and High-Speed Rail

    How should airports be regulated to contain market power? This round table proceedings first examines whether they need to be regulated at all. It concludes that because regulation is inevitably imperfect and costly, policy makers should establish conditions for competition to emerge between airports in preference to comprehensive regulation, whenever possible.

    Economic regulation is sometimes necessary, such as when airports are heavily congested. The proceedings determines which approaches are likely to work best and also assesses strategies for managing greenhouse gas emissions.  It finds that although including aviation in an open emission trading scheme could help mitigate emissions efficiently across the economy, it should not be expected to produce major cuts in CO2-emissions in aviation itself.

    Finally the proceedings identifies the economic conditions under which high-speed rail can provide a competitive substitute for aviation, revealing the limited relevance of rail to reducing greenhouse gas emissions from this part of the transport market.
  • 30-October-2009

    English

    Transport Energy and CO2 : Moving towards Sustainability

    Car ownership is set to triple by 2050, trucking activity will double and air travel could increase fourfold. This book examines how to enable mobility without accelerating climate change.  It finds that if we change the way we travel, adopt technologies to improve vehicle efficiency and shift to low-CO2 fuels, we can move onto a different pathway  where transport CO2 emissions by 2050 are far below current levels, at costs that are lower than many assume. 

    The report discusses the prospects for shifting more travel to the most efficient modes and reducing travel growth rates, improving vehicle fuel efficiency by up to 50% using cost-effective, incremental technologies, and moving toward electricity, hydrogen, and advanced biofuels to achieve a more secure and sustainable transport future. If governments implement strong policies to achieve this scenario, transport can play its role and dramatically reduce CO2 emissions by 2050.

  • 26-October-2009

    English

    Chile Energy Policy Review 2009

    Drawing on the experience of IEA member countries, this IEA review assesses Chile’s major energy challenges and provides recommendations. Six main themes emerge: the successful liberalisation of the power sector in the 1980s; the essential role played by the state in ensuring energy security; the re-formulation of Chile’s long-term energy policy; the proposed reorganisation of the institutional framework; greater independence for the system operators; and the need for a clear framework of regulation so that long-term investment decisions integrate social and environmental costs.
  • 19-October-2009

    English

    Strengthening Regional Fisheries Management Organisations

    With the development and entry into force of the United Nations Fish Stocks Agreement in 1995, the international community made a commitment to strengthen Regional Fisheries Management Organizations (RFMOs), established to deal with the management of shared high seas resources. This study takes stock of the changes made in RFMOs, highlighting a gradual process of improvement that has translated into significant success stories.  While there is no single recipe for this process, ensuring that the fundamental building blocks are in place to help create and maintain the economic and political momentum for change is important. Altering the underlying economic incentives may help to better align the interests of member countries, allowing coalitions for change to develop within the membership. The study and its analysis is built on evidence from a range of case studies of RFMOs, most notably the Conservation of Southern Bluefin Tuna (CSBT), the International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas (ICCAT), the Northwest Atlantic Fisheries Organisation (NAFO) and the North East Atlantic Fisheries Commission (NEAFC).
  • 16-October-2009

    English

    Implementing Energy Efficiency Policies: are IEA Member Countries on Track?

    This book presents 25 energy efficiency recommendations from the IEA which could, if implemented globally without delay, reduce global CO2 emissions by 8.2 gigatonnes per year by 2030 – equivalent to roughly two-times the amount of current EU CO2 emissions.

    This innovative book provides the first assessment of IEA member countries’ progress on implementing energy efficiency policy.  Using a rigorous evaluation process, it finds that while these countries are implementing a full range of energy efficiency measures, their efforts fall short. Pressing energy, climate and financial challenges require even more energy efficiency policy action – particularly in the transport sector. To address this action gap, IEA member countries must urgently ramp up their energy efficiency policy efforts. 

    The IEA and its member countries can play a critical role in promoting the Agency’s call for “Worldwide Implementation Now” (W.I.N.) of energy efficiency. What will it be? W.I.N or lose the opportunity?

  • 13-October-2009

    English

    IEA Scoreboard 2009 - 35 Key Energy Trends over 35 Years

    Measuring and assessing how much has been done by member countries over the years to follow their underlying principles is not an easy task. Each country is unique in terms of economy, geography, climate, energy resources, etc. Taking into account some of these specificities, the IEA Scoreboard 2009 compares what has been achieved by member countries in diversifying their energy mix, in promoting non-fossil fuels and energy efficiency, in encouraging research and development, and, more generally, in creating a policy framework consistent with their shared policy goals.

    Since the IEA Scoreboard 2009 is published in conjunction with the 35th anniversary of the IEA, 35 themes, ranging from diversification to prices, show how IEA countries have performed in their efforts to attain energy security, environmental protection and economic growth.   This book, which combines statistical rigour with easy access and readability, is an ideal resource for anyone who would like to have a quick overview of energy development in IEA member countries over the last 35 years. The publication also includes selected energy-related statistics for over 140 countries, economies and regions in the world.

  • 12-October-2009

    English

    Cement Technology Roadmap: Carbon Emissions Reductions up to 2050

    The cement energy technology roadmap outlines a possible transition path for the industry to make continued contributions towards a halving of global CO2 emissions by 2050. As part of this contribution, this roadmap estimates that the cement industry could reduce its direct emissions 18% from current levels by 2050. This roadmap is a first step. It is only attainable with a supportive policy framework, and appropriate financial resources invested over the long term.

  • 12-October-2009

    English

    Taxation of SMEs - Key Issues and Policy Considerations

    This report covers a broad range of SME taxation issues, including possible effects of taxation on the creation and growth of SMEs, and considerations arising from a relatively high compliance burden. Differing income tax and social security contribution burdens of unincorporated and incorporated SMEs are considered in detail, with analysis of average statutory tax rates carried out to investigate possible tax distortions to business creation and business structure decisions of a single worker/owner of an SME. Various arguments are presented for and against the targeting of tax incentives at SMEs. Country examples of SME tax incentives and compliance cost reduction measures are provided in the report.

  • 12-October-2009

    English

    Wind Energy

    Wind energy is perhaps the most advanced of the “new” renewable energy technologies, but there is still much work to be done. This energy technology roadmap identifies the key tasks that must be undertaken in order to achieve a vision of over 2 000 GW of wind energy capacity by 2050. Governments, industry, research institutions and the wider energy sector will need to work together to achieve this goal.

  • 12-October-2009

    English

    Electric and Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles

    This energy technology roadmap focuses on electric and plug-in hybrid vehicles (EV/PHEV), presenting for the first time a detailed scenario for their evolution from annual production of a few thousand to over 100 million vehicles by 2050. It finds that the next decade is a key “make or break” period for EVs and PHEVs: governments, the automobile industry, electric utilities and other stakeholders must work together to roll out vehicles and infrastructure in a coordinated fashion, and ensure that the rapidly growing consumer market is ready to purchase them. The roadmap concludes with a set of near-term actions to achieve the roadmap’s vision.

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