Publications


  • 19-June-2017

    English

    OECD Development Co-operation Peer Reviews: Iceland 2017

    This review assesses the performance of Iceland, including looking at how Iceland works in its three partner countries and on key priority issues such as gender, health, education and renewable energy.

    Iceland joined the Development Assistance Committee in 2013. This is its first peer review.

  • 16-June-2017

    English

    Engaging Employers in Apprenticeship Opportunities - Making It Happen Locally

    This joint OECD-ILO publication provides guidance on how local and regional governments can foster business-education partnerships in apprenticeship programmes and other types of work-based learning, drawing on case studies across nine countries. There has been increasing interest in apprenticeships which combine on the job training with classroom-based study, providing a smooth transition from school to work. There are benefits to both individuals and employers from participating in apprenticeships, including increased productivity and job quality. Successful implementation is contingent on having a high level of employer engagement at the local level, notably in the design, development and delivery of programmes.

  • 16-June-2017

    English

    Policies for Stronger and More Inclusive Growth in Canada

    After two decades of solid growth of household disposable income and living standards more generally, Canadians generally enjoy a high level of well-being. However, disparities persist – not all population groups have benefitted equally strongly from past improvements in living standards. Income inequality is close to the OECD average, but the tax and benefit system is less redistributive than those in most OECD countries. Despite high social mobility over a number of different dimensions such as health, earnings, social class or education, middle class self-identification has fallen in recent years. At the same time, productivity growth has slowed own, limiting the potential for further improvements in living standards. The slowdown in productivity growth is linked to a growing divide between high-productivity frontier firms and low-productivity laggards, as well as a weakening of business dynamism. The cross-cutting challenge presented by the persistence of multidimensional inequalities and weak productivity growth underlines the need for a reappraisal of Canada’s policy making process with the aim of fostering stronger and more inclusive growth.

  • 16-June-2017

    English

    OECD Reviews of Innovation Policy: Norway 2017

    Following a remarkable transformation in the past century in research and innovation, in particular through the development of new technologies and processes in sectors such as oil and gas, shipbuilding and also fisheries and aquaculture, Norway is today increasingly facing a “triple transition imperative” in which it needs, first, to shift toward a more diversified and robust economy; second, to move to a more competitive, effective and efficient innovation system; and third, to support research and innovation activities that can confront an array of societal challenges (climate change, food security, aging, health and so on). The Long-Term Plan for Research and Higher Education 2015-2024 (LTP) launched by the Norwegian government has set the base to enhance the capacity of the research and higher education system to cope with these transition challenges. This report proposes recommendations to take advantage of the revision of this comprehensive strategic plan in 2018 to improve the horizontal coordination and add more concrete structural policy initiatives, without changing the plan’s general orientation nor giving up the sectorial and the consensus principles that form the basis of Norwegian policy making.

  • 15-June-2017

    English

    OECD Investment Policy Reviews: Kazakhstan 2017

    This review, which was prepared in response to Kazakhstan's 2012 request to adhere to the Declaration on International Investment and Multinational Enterprises (OECD Declaration), analyses the general framework for investment as well as most recent reforms, and shows where further efforts are necessary. It assesses Kazakhstan’s ability to comply with the principles of openness, transparency and non-discrimination and its policy convergence with the OECD Declaration, including responsible business conduct practices. Capitalising on the OECD Policy Framework for Investment, this review studies other policy areas that are of key relevance to investment such as SME policy, infrastructure development, trade policy as well as anti-corruption efforts. Since the first review of Kazakhstan, in 2012, the authorities have made strides in opening the country to international investment and in improving the policy framework for investment as part of their efforts to diversify the economy to avoid continued overreliance on oil. Additional policy measures are nevertheless required to create a stimulating environment for investment if the government wants to fulfil its goal of economic diversification and sustainable development.

  • 15-June-2017

    English

    Multi-dimensional Review of Kazakhstan - Volume 2. In-depth Analysis and Recommendations

    Kazakhstan has embarked upon an ambitious reform agenda to realise its aspiration of becoming one of the top 30 global economies by 2050. The country’s economy and society have undergone deep transformations since independence. To sustain economic progress, overcome recent difficulties, and drive improvements in well-being to realise its aspirations, Kazakhstan will need to address a number of challenges to ensure its economy becomes more productive and diverse, and is sufficiently flexible and resilient in the face of an ever-shifting external environment. This next stage of economic transformation will require continuing reforms. This report discusses policy actions to address four key obstacles to development in Kazakhstan, identified in Volume 1 of this review. It presents in-depth analysis and recommendations to improve the economy’s resilience through diversification, to mobilise financing for development, to transform the role of the state in the economy, including through privatisation, and to improve the effectiveness of environmental regulations.

  • 15-June-2017

    English

    OECD Territorial Reviews: Kazakhstan

    Kazakhstan has experienced a long period of high and sustained economic growth, largely driven by oil and gas exports. However, the drop in 2014 of the international price of oil highlighted the risks of dependence on natural resource activities. Kazakhstan must diversify its economic base to ensure that it can continue to “catch up” and move into higher value-added goods and services. This review looks at how a modern approach to regional development can help Kazakhstan by mobilising the growth potential of different parts of the economy and territory, supporting economic diversification and reducing regional inequalities.

  • 15-June-2017

    English

    OECD Integrity Scan of Kazakhstan - Preventing Corruption for a Competitive Economy

    This report looks at how to curb corruption and build a more competitive economy in the Republic of Kazakhstan by assessing four crucial factors: governance, prevention, detection, and prosecution and recovery. In its analysis, it draws on good international practices as well as OECD instruments and tools in 15 policy areas: regulatory governance, competition policy, public financial management, development co-operation, public sector integrity, public procurement, tax administration and transparency, export credits, lobbying, whistleblower protection, business sector integrity, criminalising bribery, civil society, and media. The report provides recommendations for improving Kazakhstan’s laws and policies as well as effectively implementing them in each of these areas.

  • 14-June-2017

    English

    Guidance to Assemble and Manage Multidisciplinary Teams for Extractive Contract Negotiations

    The Guidance is intended to offer host governments the tools they need to assemble and manage a multidisciplinary team, and engage effectively in extractive contract negotiations. The Guidance aims to help governments to put in place recommended processes and identify the skills that governments may need to prepare for and conduct effective contract negotiations. This Guidance further suggests ways to ensure coordination within government and better integration between government officials and expert advisers. Annexed to this Guidance is a Terms of Reference Template that governments may use to recruit and to monitor external advisers engaged during extractive contract negotiations. The Template can also be utilised by support providers who recruit external advisers on behalf of governments for the same purpose. While recognising that human and institutional capacity building is a long-term endeavour, the Guidance suggests, wherever possible, practical ways to capture and retain the necessary soft and technical skills for successful negotiations.

  • 13-June-2017

    English

    OECD Employment Outlook 2017

    The 2017 edition of the OECD Employment Outlook reviews recent labour market trends and short-term prospects in OECD countries. Chapter 1 presents a comparative scoreboard of labour market performance that encompasses the quantity and quality of employment, as well as the inclusiveness of the labour market. During the past decade, most countries managed to better integrate women and potentially disadvantaged groups into the labour market and improve the quality of the working environment, whereas earnings quality was more or less stable and labour market security worsened. Chapter 2 looks at the resilience of labour markets following the global crisis and shows how both structural reforms and expansionary fiscal policy mitigate the unemployment costs of adverse aggregate shocks. OECD countries generally have avoided an increase in structural unemployment, but not a marked deceleration of wage and productivity growth. Chapter 3 documents the impact of technological progress and globalisation on OECD labour markets over the past two decades. Technology is shown to have been strongly associated with both job polarisation and de-industrialisation. The impact of trade integration is difficult to detect and probably small, although rising imports from China has a small effect in depressing employment in manufacturing. Chapter 4 provides an exceptionally rich portrait of collective bargaining in OECD countries that makes it possible to understand better how national systems differ and the implications of those differences for economic performance.

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