Publications


  • 3-February-2018

    English

    Energy Policies Beyond IEA Countries: Chile 2018

    Chile’s energy policy has evolved dynamically in recent years. In response to changes in the domestic and international environment, significant institutional and policy reforms as well as major infrastructure projects have been carried out. The National Energy Policy 2050 was adopted in 2015, following an exceptionally inclusive public consultation. The electricity sector, in particular, has developed quickly.This second review of Chile’s energy policies by the International Energy Agency finds that the country has emerged as a world-class destination for solar and wind energy developers. New legislation encourages investment in generating capacity across the electricity sector. The expanded role of the state in energy planning has helped to boost project development, especially in electricity transmission. The country now also has an interconnected national electricity system.Integrating growing shares of variable renewable energy requires a flexible power system. More transmission infrastructure, storage, and demand-side response are needed. The government should now ensure that the electricity market design and infrastructure facilitate the integration of solar and wind power. By exploiting its vast renewable energy potential, Chile can help reduce electricity prices and dependency on fuel imports.Renewables and energy efficiency can also help limit carbon emissions and air pollution. Chile should make more use of mandatory energy performance standards for products, equipment, vehicles and buildings. Efficient and clean use of firewood and alternative heating technologies can be supported through policies, regulation and financial incentives. Energy and climate aspects should also be an integral part of the long-term policies for transport and urban development.
  • 1-February-2018

    English

    OECD Labour Force Statistics 2017

    This annual edition of Labour Force Statistics provides detailed statistics on labour force, employment and unemployment, broken down by gender, as well as unemployment duration, employment status, employment by sector of activity and part-time employment. It also contains participation and unemployment rates by gender and detailed age groups as well as comparative tables for the main components of the labour force. Data are available for each OECD member country and for OECD-Total, Euro area and European Union. The time series presented in the publication cover 10 years for most countries. It also provides information on the sources and definitions used by member countries in the compilation of those statistics.
  • 29-January-2018

    English

    Making Blended Finance Work for the Sustainable Development Goals

    The global community has spoken loud and clear: more resources must be mobilised to end extreme poverty and mitigate the effects of climate change. Blended finance - an approach to mix different forms of capital in support of development - is emerging as an important solution to help raise resources for the Sustainable Development Goals in developing countries. But scaling up blended finance without a good understanding of its risks could have unintended consequences for development co-operation providers. This report presents a comprehensive assessment of the state and priorities for blended finance as it is being used to support sustainable development in developing countries.  It describes concepts and definitions, presents an overview of actors and instruments, and discusses lessons learned from blending approaches, tracking and data, and monitoring and evaluation. Its findings and recommendations are useful for policy makers and practitioners.
     'Blended finance will contribute to faster economic growth, but to achieve this it is vital to get donors into alignment.'
    Martin Wolf, Chief Economics Commentator, Financial Times
    'Official development assistance continues to be a key way to finance efforts aimed at eradicating extreme poverty. However, the challenge is more than governments alone can manage. We must all think, work, finance and deliver development differently to mobilize private-sector resources and expertise to help the world’s poorest and most vulnerable people. Canada continues to promote innovative approaches to finance development and achieve sustainable growth for everyone.'
    The Honourable Marie-Claude Bibeau, Canada's Minister of International Development and La Francophonie.
  • 26-January-2018

    English

    Preventing the Flooding of the Seine in the Paris–Ile de France Region - Progress Made and Future Challenges

    The risk of the Seine flooding the Ile de France region is a major one. In 2014, the OECD estimated that flooding comparable to the historic 1910 flood could affect up to 5 million citizens and cause damage costing up to 30 billion euros. This update tracks the progress made since 2014 and identifies remaining challenges.
  • 24-January-2018

    English

    How Immigrants Contribute to Developing Countries' Economies

    How Immigrants Contribute to Developing Countries' Economies is the result of a project carried out by the OECD Development Centre and the International Labour Organization, with support from the European Union. The report covers the ten partner countries: Argentina, Costa Rica, Côte d'Ivoire, the Dominican Republic, Ghana, Kyrgyzstan, Nepal, Rwanda, South Africa and Thailand. The project, Assessing the Economic Contribution of Labour Migration in Developing Countries as Countries of Destination, aimed to provide empirical evidence – both quantitative and qualitative – on the multiple ways immigrants affect their host countries.The report shows that labour migration has a relatively limited impact in terms of native-born workers’ labour market outcomes, economic growth and public finance in the ten partner countries. This implies that perceptions of possible negative effects of immigrants are often unjustified. But it also means that most countries of destination do not sufficiently leverage the human capital and expertise that immigrants bring. Public policies can play a key role in enhancing immigrants’ contribution to their host countries’ development.
  • 24-January-2018

    English

    Ageing and Employment Policies: United States 2018 - Working Better with Age and Fighting Unequal Ageing

    In the United States, employment rates at older ages are comparatively high at 62% among 55-64 year-olds against 59% on average in OECD countries in 2016. However, there are large disparities across population groups. Early retirement remains a widespread phenomenon, especially among workers from vulnerable socio-economic backgrounds. Preventing old-age disparities in terms of employment outcomes and retirement income from widening is crucial. This report looks at the various pathways out of the labour market for older workers, and how employers can be supported to retain and hire older workers. It examines the best ways that the United States can promote the employability of workers throughout their working lives and more equal outcomes among older workers.
  • 24-January-2018

    English

    Towards an All-Hazards Approach to Emergency Preparedness and Response - Lessons Learnt from Non-Nuclear Events

    The field of emergency management is broad, complex and dynamic. In the post-Fukushima context, emergency preparedness and response (EPR) in the nuclear sector is more than ever being seen as part of a broader framework. The OECD has recommended that its members 'establish and promote a comprehensive, allhazards and transboundary approach to country risk governance to serve as the foundation for enhancing national resilience and responsiveness'. In order to achieve such an all-hazards approach to emergency management, a major step in the process will be to consider experiences from the emergency management of hazards emanating from a variety of sectors.The NEA Working Party on Nuclear Emergency Matters (WPNEM) joined forces with the OECD Working Group on Chemical Accidents (WGCA), the OECD Public Governance and Territorial Development Directorate’s High-Level Risk Forum (HLRF) and the European Commission’s Joint Research Centre (JRC) to collaborate on this report, which demonstrates similarities between emergency planning and preparedness across sectors, and identifies lessons learnt and good practices in diverse areas for the benefit of the international community. A set of expert contributions, enriched with a broad range of national experiences, are presented in the report to take into account expertise gathered from the emergency management of hazards other than those emanating from the nuclear sector in an effort to support and foster an all-hazards approach to EPR.
  • 23-January-2018

    English

    Teaching for Global Competence in a Rapidly Changing World

    This new publication sets forward the PISA framework for global competence developed by the OECD, which aligns closely with the definition developed by the Center for Global Education at Asia Society. Based on the Center’s extensive experience supporting educators in integrating global competence into their teaching, the publication also provides practical guidance and examples of how educators can embed global competence into their existing curriculum, instruction, and assessment.
  • 17-January-2018

    English

    Quarterly National Accounts - Volume 2017 Issue 3

    The OECD’s Quarterly National Accounts contains a selection of the accounts most widely used by economic analysts: GDP by expenditure, GDP by industry, GDP by income, gross fixed capital formation by asset, gross fixed capital formation by institutional sector, Saving and Net lending and components of disposable income as well as population and employment data (national concept) and employment by industry (domestic concept).

    The data cover 35 OECD countries, and totals are provided for the following groups: OECD, OECD-Europe, European Union, Euro area, G7 and G20.

    Data are based on the System of National Accounts 2008 (2008 SNA) for all OECD members.

  • 10-January-2018

    English

    Public Procurement in Nuevo León, Mexico - Promoting Efficiency through Centralisation and Professionalisation

    This review examines the ongoing public procurement reforms in Nuevo León, Mexico: both the progress achieved so far and the many challenges that remain. It discusses the benefits of further centralisation of public procurement activities for goods and services, greater aggregation, and a shift in administrative culture from excessive formality toward strategic public procurement and value for money. The review provides concrete proposals addressing every aspect of the procurement lifecycle, from planning and market consultations to contract management.
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