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Publications


  • 25-July-2019

    English

    Recent Trends in International Migration of Doctors, Nurses and Medical Students

    This report describes recent trends in the international migration of doctors and nurses in OECD countries. Over the past decade, the number of doctors and nurses has increased in many OECD countries, and foreign-born and foreign-trained doctors and nurses have contributed to a significant extent. New in-depth analysis of the internationalisation of medical education shows that in some countries (e.g. Israel, Norway, Sweden and the United States) a large and growing number of foreign-trained doctors are people born in these countries who obtained their first medical degree abroad before coming back. The report includes four case studies on the internationalisation of medical education in Europe (France, Ireland, Poland and Romania) as well as a case study on the integration of foreign-trained doctors in Canada.
  • 24-July-2019

    English

    Revenue Statistics in Asian and Pacific Economies 2019

    Revenue Statistics in Asian and Pacific Economies is jointly produced by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD)’s Centre for Tax Policy and Administration (CTP) and the OECD Development Centre (DEV) with the co-operation of the Asian Development Bank (ADB), the Pacific Island Tax Administrators Association (PITAA), and the Pacific Community (SPC) and the financial support of the European Union and the government of Japan. It compiles comparable tax revenue statistics for Australia, Cook Islands, Fiji, Indonesia, Japan, Kazakhstan, Korea, Malaysia, New Zealand, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Samoa, Singapore, Solomon Islands, Thailand, Tokelau and Vanuatu and comparable non-tax revenue statistics for the Cook Islands, Papua New Guinea, Samoa, Tokelau and Vanuatu. The model is the OECD Revenue Statistics database which is a fundamental reference, backed by a well-established methodology, for OECD member countries. Extending the OECD methodology to Asian and Pacific economies enables comparisons about tax levels and tax structures on a consistent basis, both among Asian and Pacific economies and with OECD, Latin American and Caribbean and African averages.
  • 24-July-2019

    English

    OECD Economic Surveys: Malaysia 2019

    Malaysia’s economy is doing well, but social and governance challenges must be addressed. The new government prioritises inclusive growth and improving trust in public institutions. Further progress towards the planned target of high-income country status by 2024 will also require focusing on productivity growth with structural reforms to move up the value chain and improve skills. Ensuring environmental protection will improve the quality of growth.Growth is set to moderate in the near term, mainly due to slowing global trade. The rising cost of living has been a source of concern for large segments of the population. Progress could be made by providing a more targeted support, boosting entrepreneurship, improving productivity and employability among the low-income households.Fiscal policy needs reform. Building up fiscal space and ensuring medium-term sustainability will require increasing the low level of tax revenue. Improving budget process transparency and strengthening public debt management are key to fiscal accountability.Human capital development is needed to boost productivity and promote inclusive growth. Labour market imbalances hinder productivity and make it more difficult to climb up the value chain. Investment in education and training would help under-qualified workers. Policies to stimulate the demand for high-level skills would support those who are over-qualified.SPECIAL FEATURE: REDUCING SKILLS IMBALANCES TO FOSTER PRODUCTIVITY GROWTH
  • 24-July-2019

    English

    The Role of Gas in Today’s Energy Transitions

    This World Energy Outlook special report examines the role of fuel switching, primarily from coal to natural gas, to reduce emissions of carbon dioxide and air pollutants. Four case studies, covering the United States, the European Union, the People’s Republic of China, and India, reveal the various opportunities, hurdles and limits of fuel switching as a way to address environmental challenges.
  • 24-July-2019

    English

    Energy Security in ASEAN +6

    The ASEAN+6 group comprises the ten countries of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) and six other countries in the Asia-Pacific region: Australia, the People’s Republic of China ('China'), India, Japan, Korea and New Zealand. This group includes the world’s fastest-growing and most dynamic energy consumption centres. They are led by China, India and ASEAN, the emerging Asian economies, whose share of global energy demand is expected to reach 40% by 2040, up from only 20% in 2000.Energy demand in the ASEAN+6 countries is set to take diverse paths. In India, for example, low per capita energy use and a high population growth rate indicate the potential for substantial energy demand growth. In Japan, by contrast, a declining population and increasing energy efficiencies are contributing to a continuous fall in energy consumption. Countries of the region also differ in their natural resource wealth and their levels of socio-economic and technological development.These countries share common challenges, however, in ensuring the security of their energy supplies. Given their shared geographical location, they could help one another meet these energy security challenges by deepening regional co-operation.This report starts by giving an overview of the energy security issues of the region. Subsequent chapters cover the key energy sectors of oil, natural gas and electricity. They identify the main energy security issues, including a high level of vulnerability to natural disasters and heavy dependence on imports of fossil fuels, which must pass through major global chokepoints. The report provides policy advice, primarily for the region’s developing countries, based on the emergency response systems and accumulated experience in energy security of the International Energy Agency and its member countries.
  • 24-July-2019

    English

    Strengthening SMEs and Entrepreneurship for Productivity and Inclusive Growth - OECD 2018 Ministerial Conference on SMEs

    SMEs that grow have a considerable positive impact on employment creation, innovation, productivity growth and competitiveness. Digital technologies and global value chains offer new opportunities for SMEs to participate in the global economy, innovate and strengthen productivity. Yet SMEs are lagging behind in the digital transition and are disproportionately affected by market failures, trade barriers, policy inefficiencies and the quality of institutions. A cross-cutting approach to SME policy can enhance SME innovation and scale-up, as well as their contributions to inclusive growth. This includes a business environment conducive to risk-taking and experimentation by entrepreneurs, as well as access to entrepreneurship competencies, management and workforce skills, technology, innovation, and networks.
  • 23-July-2019

    English

    Background Notes on Sustainable, Productive and Resilient Agro-Food Systems - Value Chains, Human Capital, and the 2030 Agenda

    This report, prepared by FAO and the OECD with inputs from ERIA, IFPRI, IFAD, and WTO, has been submitted to the G20 Presidency of Japan in response to the Presidency’s requestfor background notes on Sustainable, Productive and Resilient Agro-Food Systems: value chains, human capital, and the 2030 Agenda.
  • 17-July-2019

    English

    Linking Indigenous Communities with Regional Development

    The 38 million Indigenous peoples living across 12 OECD countries contribute to stronger regional and national economies, and have unique assets and knowledge that address global challenges such as climate change. Supporting their economic inclusion at local and regional levels is essential to achieving the promise of the Sustainable Development Goals to 'leave no-one behind' and overcoming the significant gaps in well-being that continue to exist between Indigenous and non-Indigenous populations, notably in rural areas. This report provides recommendations to achieve vibrant local and regional Indigenous economies that deliver on their objectives for development by: improving Indigenous statistics and data governance; enabling policies for entrepreneurship and small business; providing instruments to mobilise land for development; and implementing effective and inclusive governance to support a place-based approach.
  • 16-July-2019

    English

    Governance as an SDG Accelerator - Country Experiences and Tools

    Delivering on the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) is a formidable governance challenge for countries at all levels of development. It requires governments to co-ordinate, consult and work across policy areas – as well as with the businesses sector and civil society – in an unprecedented way. This report provides evidence from OECD countries and partner economies on how public governance practices can be strengthened to help implement the SDGs. It looks at whole-of-government co-ordination, policy coherence and integrity, stakeholder engagement and open government, and the strategic use of budgeting, procurement and regulatory tools. It discusses robust monitoring and evaluation systems for ensuring that public policies and resource allocations for SDG implementation result in meaningful outcomes. It also explores how governance frameworks to support equal access to justice and gender equality can help catalyse implementation across the entire 2030 Agenda.
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