Employment


  • 1-December-2017

    English

    OECD Skills Strategy Diagnostic Report: The Netherlands 2017

    The Netherlands today is prosperous, but its future success is not assured.  The Netherlands owes its success in no small part to actions it has taken in the past to develop a highly skilled population. Given the profound economic and social transformation that the Netherlands is currently undergoing, skills will be even more important for success in the future.  The Dutch education system and the skills of the Dutch population are strong overall. Therefore many of the opportunities for further improving the skills outcomes of the Netherlands are to be found in areas of society where the government has more limited influence, such as the workplace and community. As a consequence, achieving the Netherlands’ skills ambitions will require a whole-of-society approach.The OECD Skills Strategy Diagnostic Report: Netherlands identifies the following three skills priorities for the Netherlands - fostering more equitable skills outcomes, creating skills-intensive workplaces, and promoting a learning culture. These priorities were identified through the analysis of common themes that emerged from stakeholder perspectives on the most important skills challenges facing the Netherlands, and through the OECD’s analysis of the nine skills challenges identified and examined in the report.
  • 6-September-2016

    English

    The Netherlands should strengthen policies to attract and retain migrant skilled workers

    The Netherlands should improve its policies to attract and retain highly skilled migrants in order to address labour shortages and strengthen its position as a knowledge-based economy, according to a new OECD report.

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  • 6-September-2016

    English

    Recruiting Immigrant Workers: The Netherlands 2016

    The Dutch labour migration system has undergone substantive changes in recent years. To induce a transition to more high-skilled migration, a programme based on salary thresholds has grown in volume while a programme based on work permits after a labour market test has shrunk. New programmes target international graduates either of Dutch educational institutions or of selected institutions abroad. Changes to immigration procedures have shifted responsibility to migrants' employers and have greatly reduced processing times. This review first examines the composition of labour migration to the Netherlands, in the context of present and expected demand in the Dutch labour market. Following a discussion of various programmes and procedures, the review assesses how labour migration contributes to the strategic development of sectors and to employment in regions. It then explores the determinants for the retention of high-skilled migrants and for the integration of international graduates into the Dutch labour market.
  • 4-March-2015

    English

    High-Level Policy Forum on Mental Health and Work: Bridging Employment and Health Policies - Closing Statement

    This Forum does not mark the end of a process. It was a key step aimed at sharing the main conclusions of our work on Mental Health and Work and to discuss where we stand, with the goal of connecting health policy makers and employment policy makers in order to discuss an issue that they can only solve together.

  • 4-March-2015

    English

    Fit Mind, Fit Job: From Evidence to Practice in Mental Health and Work

    Introductory remarks at the high-level OECD Policy Forum on Mental Health and Work: Bridging Employment and Health Policies, The Hague, Netherlands, 4 March 2015

  • 1-December-2014

    English

    Mental Health and Work: Netherlands

    Tackling mental ill-health of the working-age population is becoming a key issue for labour market and social policies in OECD countries. OECD governments increasingly recognise that policy has a major role to play in keeping people with mental ill-health in employment or bringing those outside of the labour market back to it, and in preventing mental illness. This report on the Netherlands is the seventh in a series of reports looking at how the broader education, health, social and labour market policy challenges identified in Sick on the Job? Myths and Realities about Mental Health and Work (OECD, 2012) are being tackled in a number of OECD countries.
  • 1-December-2014

    English

    The Netherlands should do more to help workers with mental ill-health, says OECD

    The Netherlands should increase support for workers suffering from mental health issues and their employers and tackle the continued social stigma and limited knowledge around such illnesses, according to a new OECD report.

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  • 3-June-2014

    English

    Meeting of the OECD Council at Ministerial Level 2015

    Focused on "Unlocking investment for sustainable growth and jobs", the 2015 OECD Ministerial Council Meeting (MCM) will be held at the OECD Headquarters in Paris on Wednesday and Thursday 3-4 June 2015, under the chairmanship of the Netherlands, with the Czech Republic, France and Korea as Vice-Chairs.

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  • 16-April-2014

    English

    The Netherlands must do more to make working at an older age more attractive, says OECD

    Encouraging more people to work later in life would help the Netherlands meet its growing challenges of a rapidly ageing population and rising social spending, according to a new OECD report.

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  • 12-November-2013

    English

    Country specific-material

    Two rounds of the Survey of Adult Skills are under way: Round 1 (2008-13) with 24 participating countries, whose results were released in October 2013, and Round 2 (2012-16) with 9 participating countries, whose results will be released in 2016. A third round is scheduled to begin in May 2014.

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