Publications & Documents


  • 10-January-2018

    English

    Second Public Procurement Review of the Mexican Institute of Social Security (IMSS) - Reshaping Strategies for Better Healthcare

    This review highlights achievements of the Mexican Institute of Social Security (Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, IMSS) in a number of areas – human resources, technological capacities and relations with suppliers – which were previously identified by the OECD as pivotal for the successful reform of IMSS procurement operations. This report highlights the progress made and offers recommendations to support IMSS in achieving procurement excellence and fulfilling its mandate to provide the best possible, most cost-effective healthcare services to citizens.
  • 21-December-2017

    English

    Catching Up? Intergenerational Mobility and Children of Immigrants

    Previous OECD and EU work has shown that even native-born children with immigrant parents face persistent disadvantage in the education system, the school-to-work transition, and the labour market. To which degree are these linked with their immigration background, i.e. with the issues faced by their parents? This publication includes cross-country comparative work and provides new insights on the complex issue of the intergenerational transmission of disadvantage for native-born children of immigrants.
  • 20-December-2017

    English

    How Immigrants Contribute to Thailand's Economy

    The effects of immigration on the Thai economy are considerable, as the number of immigrants has increased rapidly since the turn of the century. Immigrant workers now contribute to all economic sectors, and are important for the workforce in industrial sectors such as construction and manufacturing and in some service sectors including private household services. Immigration is associated with an improvement of labour market outcomes of the native-born population, and in particular appears to increase paid employment opportunities. Immigration is also likely to raise income per capita in Thailand, due to the relatively high share of the immigrant population which is employed and therefore contributes to economic output. Policies aiming to further diversify employment opportunities for immigrant workers could also be beneficial for the economic contribution of immigration.
     
    How Immigrants Contribute to Thailand’s Economy is the result of a project carried out by the OECD Development Centre and the International Labour Organization, with support from the European Union. The project aimed to analyse several economic impacts – on the labour market, economic growth and public finance – of immigration in ten partner countries: Argentina, Costa Rica, Côte d'Ivoire, the Dominican Republic, Ghana, Kyrgyzstan, Nepal, Rwanda, South Africa and Thailand. The empirical evidence stems from a combination of quantitative and qualitative analyses of secondary and in some cases primary data sources.
  • 18-December-2017

    English

    Continuous Reporting System on International Migration in the Americas (SICREMI)

    SICREMI is an initiative of the Organization of American States (OAS) that aims to contribute to the promotion and development of public policies that lead to improved migration management in the Americas through the facilitation of dialogue, cooperation, institutional strengthening and access to information.

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  • 5-December-2017

    English, PDF, 467kb

    Agenda of the conference - How Immigrants Contribute in Kyrgyzstan - 5 December 2017

    How Immigrants Contribute to Kyrgyzstan’ Economies 5 December 2017 - Agenda

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  • 5-December-2017

    English

    How Immigrants Contribute to Kyrgyzstan's Economy

    The recent effects of immigration on the Kyrgyz economy appear to be limited. Many immigrants have been in the country for several decades, hence are overrepresented among the older cohorts, resulting in a lower labour force participation rate than among the native-born. Still, the estimated share of value added generated by immigrants exceeds their share of the labour force but also of the population. Overall, immigration is not associated with a deteriorating labour force situation for the native-born population. In contrast, the current contribution of immigrants to public finance appears to be negative. The high concentration among retirement-age individuals is a major reason for this outcome as the estimate disregards their prior contributions to public revenues. Kyrgyzstan's economy would benefit from changes in certain migration and non-migration sectoral policies.How Immigrants Contribute to Kyrgyzstan’s Economy is the result of a project carried out by the OECD Development Centre and the International Labour Organization, with support from the European Union. The project aimed to analyse several economic impacts – on the labour market, economic growth, and public finance – of immigration in ten partner countries: Argentina, Costa Rica, Côte d'Ivoire, the Dominican Republic, Ghana, Kyrgyzstan, Nepal, Rwanda, South Africa and Thailand. The empirical evidence stems from a combination of quantitative and qualitative analyses of secondary and in some cases primary data sources.
  • 4-December-2017

    English

    ECLM Events

    Calendar of events of the ECLM project

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  • 28-November-2017

    English

    ECLM About

    In 2014, the OECD Development Centre, in collaboration with the International Labour Organization (ILO), initiated a three-and-a-half-year project, co-financed by the EU Thematic Programme on Migration and Asylum.

  • 20-November-2017

    English

    The OECD calls on France to modernise and strengthen the co-ordination of labour immigration

    In a new report, the OECD says that France should modernise and strengthen the co-ordination of labour immigration in order to attract foreign talent and align itself more closely with the needs of the labour market.

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  • 15-November-2017

    English

    New OECD data expose deep well-being divisions

    New well-being data released today expose deep divisions in our society along fault lines of age, wealth, gender and education. The OECD’s latest How’s Life? report shows that while some aspects of well-being have improved since 2005, too many people are unable to share the benefits of the modest recovery that is underway in many OECD countries.

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