Share

Publications & Documents


  • 11-June-2019

    English, Excel, 917kb

    Migration Data Brief 4

    The OECD, with the support of the French Development Agency (AFD), has in recent years developed a database on immigrants in OECD countries (DIOC) which compiles statistics on migrant stocks based on country of birth. This Migration Data Brief presents the findings drawn from the most recent update of these data for 2015/16.

    Related Documents
  • 6-June-2019

    English

    The Road to Integration - Education and Migration

    Migration has been at the centre of policy debates across the OECD in recent years. This synthesis report identifies eight pillars of policy-making that the Strength through Diversity project has revealed to be crucial if education systems to effectively support newcomers. For each pillar, the report details a set of principles driving the design and implementation of system-level policies and school-level practices. The eight pillars are: 1. consider the heterogeneity of immigrant populations, 2. develop approaches to promote the overall well-being of immigrants, 3. address the unique needs of refugee students, 4. ensure that motivation translates into a key asset for immigrant communities, 5. organise resources to reduce the influence of socio-economic status on the outcomes of immigrants, 6. provide comprehensive language support, 7. build the capacity of teachers to deal with diversity, and 8. break down barriers to social cohesion while ensuring effective service delivery.
  • 3-June-2019

    English

    Second International Forum on Migration Statistics (IFMS) Call for papers and parallel session organisers

    Call for papers and parallel session organisers: IOM, OECD and UNDESA Second Forum on Migration Statistics (IFMS) 20-21 January 2020 in Cairo, Egypt

    Related Documents
  • 3-June-2019

    English

    Enabling Women’s Economic Empowerment - New Approaches to Unpaid Care Work in Developing Countries

    Women’s unequal share of unpaid care work can prevent their full participation in the economies of developing countries; however, care needs are growing globally. How can governments and development partners meet the needs of families and communities, while ensuring that all citizens benefit from economic opportunities and fair remuneration? As part of the OECD Policy Dialogue on Women’s Economic Empowerment, this report focuses on identifying what works to address unpaid care work and sheds light on how governments, donors in the private sector and civil society actors – among others – can design policies to support both those who need care and those who provide care. The report brings together existing knowledge of policy options for unpaid care work across regions, in four policy areas: infrastructure, social protection, public services and the promotion of shared responsibility within the household.
  • 29-May-2019

    English

    Migration policy affects attractiveness of OECD countries to international talent

    The most attractive OECD countries for highly qualified potential immigrants are Australia, Sweden, Switzerland, New Zealand and Canada, in part because of favourable admission and stay conditions.

    Related Documents
  • 29-May-2019

    English, PDF, 3,103kb

    Talent Attractiveness Working Paper

    This paper introduces a new set of indicators aimed at benchmarking how OECD countries fare in attracting talented migrants. Three different profiles of talent are considered: workers with graduate (master or doctorate) degrees, entrepreneurs, and university students.

    Related Documents
  • 28-May-2019

    English, PDF, 1,132kb

    How do OECD countries compare in their attractiveness for talented migrants?

    This issue of Migration Policy Debates presents the results of the first edition of the OECD Indicators of Talent Attractiveness, developed by the OECD with support from the Bertelsmann Stiftung.

    Related Documents
  • 21-May-2019

    English

    Building Partnerships for Effectively Managing Labor Migration: Lessons from Asian countries

    This report analyzes labor migration trends in Asia and emphasizes the importance of partnerships to promote effective labor migration management. It addresses temporary migrant worker programs, focusing on the Republic of Korea’s Employment Permit System and Malaysia’s Electrical and Electronics industry. It also highlights the key role multilateral and bilateral agreements play in protecting migrant workers’ social security entitlements. Key issues covered are how these partnerships can provide safe, orderly, and fair labor migration, and, hence, a fair environment in Asia’s labor market.The four chapters capture the ideas, insights, and discussions from the 'Eighth Roundtable on Labor Migration in Asia - Building Partnerships for Effectively Managing Labor Migration: Lessons from Asian Countries for the UN Global Compact on Migration', hosted by Human Resource Development Korea in Incheon, Republic of Korea, in January 2018. The event, co-organized by the Asian Development Bank Institute, the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, and the International Labour Organization, brought together regional experts and policy makers.The report’s introductory chapter reviews recent regional trends, and two statistical annexes offer detailed coverage of intra-Asia migration flows, as well as cross-regional migration flows.
  • 17-May-2019

    English

    OECD-CEPII Call for papers 2019

    Call for papers: OECD-CEPII conference on immigration in OECD countries 12-13 Dec 2019

    Related Documents
  • 17-April-2019

    English

    Investing in Youth: Peru

    The present report on Peru is part of the series on 'Investing in Youth', which builds on the expertise of the OECD on youth employment, social support and skills. This series covers both OECD countries and countries in the process of accession to the OECD, as well as some emerging economies. The report provides a detailed diagnosis of youth policies in the areas of social, employment, education and training policies. Its main focus is on young people who are not in employment, education or training (the 'NEETs').Earlier reviews in the same series have looked at youth policies in Brazil (2014), Latvia and Tunisia (2015), Australia, Lithuania and Sweden (2016), Japan (2017), and Norway (2018).
  • << < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 > >>