Publications & Documents


  • 7-June-2016

    English

    Recruiting Immigrant Workers: Europe 2016

    The OECD series Recruiting Immigrant Workers comprises country studies of labour migration policies. Each volume analyses whether a country is effectively and efficiently using migration policy to help meet its labour needs, without adverse effects on national labour markets. It focuses mainly on regulated labour migration movements over which policy has immediate and direct oversight. This particular volume looks at the efficiency of key EU instruments in managing labour migration.

  • 17-May-2016

    English

    The refugee crisis: Challenges and responses for social investment

    The OECD and CEB have led global work on migration for decades: the OECD has contributed analysis, data, knowledge, and tools to inform dialogue and shape policy; and CEB has worked on the frontlines, financing social projects for migrants, refugees, displaced persons, and other vulnerable groups. Given the complementarities between our work, the potential synergies from co-operation are clear.

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  • 13-May-2016

    English

    Sweden in a strong position to integrate refugees, but support for the low skilled needs to be strengthened

    Sweden should address housing shortages, begin integration activities early, and improve the support for those with low skills to speed up the effective integration of refugees, according to a new OECD report.

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  • 13-May-2016

    English

    Working Together: Skills and Labour Market Integration of Immigrants and their Children in Sweden

    This review is the first in a new series on the skills and labour market integration of immigrants and their children. With 16% of its population born abroad, Sweden has one of the larger immigrant populations among the European OECD countries. Estimates suggest that about half of the foreign-born population originally came to Sweden as refugees or as the family of refugees and Sweden has been the OECD country that has had by far the largest inflows of asylum seekers relative to its population. In all OECD countries, humanitarian migrants and their families face greater challenges to integrate into the labour market than other groups. It is thus not surprising that immigrant versus native-born differences are larger than elsewhere, which also must be seen in the context of high skills and labour market participation among the native-born. For both genders, employment disparities are particularly pronounced among the low-educated, among whom immigrants are heavily overrepresented. These immigrants face particular challenges related to the paucity of low-skilled jobs in Sweden, and policy needs to acknowledge that their integration pathway tends to be a long one. Against this backdrop, Sweden has highly developed and longstanding integration policies that mainly aim at upskilling immigrants while temporarily lowering the cost of hiring, while other tools that work more strongly with the social partners and the civil society are less well developed and need strengthening.

  • 29-April-2016

    English

    Local responses to refugee crisis: from initial reception to longer term integration

    The OECD LEED Programme launches this "Call for Initiatives" to extract what local authorities and other actors know works, what the new scenario is demanding and how equipped they are to respond. We are interested in learning from the experiences of EU member countries, the wider OECD area as well as other countries.

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  • 16-April-2016

    English

    World Bank/IMF April 2016 meetings: Written statement to the Development Committee

    With the right approach and policies, all countries ─ origin, transit and host ─ can harness the benefits of migration and open up new opportunities for economic and social growth at national, regional and international levels. The OECD remains fully committed to advancing an ambitious, comprehensive and coordinated global agenda to help navigate the current refugee crisis and better harness the strengths and skills of migrants.

  • 13-April-2016

    English

    Migration flows: Facts, fiction and the politics in between

    Refugees can and should be part of the solution to many of the challenges our societies confront. Our analysis confirms the sizeable economic and social benefits that well‑managed migration can bring to OECD countries. Realising these benefits will depend largely on the design and implementation of integration measures.

  • 31-March-2016

    English, PDF, 342kb

    Greece Policy Brief: Addressing Migration Challenges beyond the Current Humanitarian Crisis

    In the last 25 years Greece turned from an emigration to an immigration country. Today the country is faced with an unprecedented humanitarian crisis with the arrival of close to 950,000 people between January 2015 and February 2016.

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  • 31-March-2016

    English, PDF, 1,007kb

    Summary and Conclusions of High-Level Conference on the Integration of Beneficiaries of International Protection

    The OECD and the UNHCR jointly organised a high-level one-day event focusing on the importance and value of integration. It sought to emphasize the economic opportunity that this presents for receiving societies, while underscoring the need for countries to invest in refugees' integration, including their social inclusion.

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  • 31-March-2016

    English

    OECD Reviews of Labour Market and Social Policies: Latvia 2016

    Latvia has undergone major economic and social change since the early 1990s. Despite an exceptionally deep recession following the global financial crisis, impressive economic growth over the past two decades has narrowed income and productivity gaps relative to comparator countries in the OECD. But Latvians report low degrees of life satisfaction, very large numbers of Latvians have left the country, and growth has not been inclusive. A volatile economy and very large income disparities create pressing needs for more effective social and labour-market policies. The government’s reform programme rightly acknowledges inequality as a key challenge. However, without sustained policy efforts and adequate resources, there is a risk that productivity and income growth could remain below potential and social cohesion could be further weakened by high or rising inequality.

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