Latest Documents


  • 7-June-2016

    English

    Recruiting Immigrant Workers: Europe 2016

    The OECD series Recruiting Immigrant Workers comprises country studies of labour migration policies. Each volume analyses whether migration policy is being used effectively and efficiently to help meet labour needs, without adverse effects on labour markets. It focuses mainly on regulated labour migration movements over which policy has immediate and direct oversight. This particular volume looks at the efficiency of European Union instruments for managing labour migration.

  • 13-May-2016

    English

    Working Together: Skills and Labour Market Integration of Immigrants and their Children in Sweden

    This review is the first in a new series on the skills and labour market integration of immigrants and their children. With 16% of its population born abroad, Sweden has one of the larger immigrant populations among the European OECD countries. Estimates suggest that about half of the foreign-born population originally came to Sweden as refugees or as the family of refugees and Sweden has been the OECD country that has had by far the largest inflows of asylum seekers relative to its population. In all OECD countries, humanitarian migrants and their families face greater challenges to integrate into the labour market than other groups. It is thus not surprising that immigrant versus native-born differences are larger than elsewhere, which also must be seen in the context of high skills and labour market participation among the native-born. For both genders, employment disparities are particularly pronounced among the low-educated, among whom immigrants are heavily overrepresented. These immigrants face particular challenges related to the paucity of low-skilled jobs in Sweden, and policy needs to acknowledge that their integration pathway tends to be a long one. Against this backdrop, Sweden has highly developed and longstanding integration policies that mainly aim at upskilling immigrants while temporarily lowering the cost of hiring, while other tools that work more strongly with the social partners and the civil society are less well developed and need strengthening.

  • 31-March-2016

    English, PDF, 1,007kb

    Summary and Conclusions of High-Level Conference on the Integration of Beneficiaries of International Protection

    The OECD and the UNHCR jointly organised a high-level one-day event focusing on the importance and value of integration. It sought to emphasize the economic opportunity that this presents for receiving societies, while underscoring the need for countries to invest in refugees' integration, including their social inclusion.

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  • 23-March-2016

    English

    Health Workforce

    Health workers are crucial for ensuring access to high quality care for the whole population. The OECD advises countries on how to meet future demand for health professionals and how to manage the supply of health workers, by reviewing policies related to education and training, continuous professional development, geographic distribution and immigration.

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  • 4-February-2016

    English, PDF, 2,550kb

    Labor migration in asia: Building effective institutions

    The annual Roundtable on Labor Migration in Asia has been organized since 2011 by the Asian Development Bank Institute and the Organization of Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), and since 2013 also by the International Labour Organization (ILO). In recent years, the three organizations have worked together to produce a yearly report on the themes of each roundtable.

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  • 28-January-2016

    English

    Making Integration Work - Refugees and others in need of protection

    The OECD series Making Integration Work draws on key lessons from the OECD’s work on integration, particularly the Jobs for Immigrants country reviews series. The objective is to summarise in a non-technical way the main challenges and good policy practices to support the lasting integration of immigrants and their children for selected key groups and domains of integration.  Each volume presents ten lessons and examples of good practice, complemented by synthetic comparisons of the integration policy frameworks in OECD countries. This first volume deals with refugees and others in need of protection, referred to as humanitarian migrants.

  • 18-December-2015

    English, PDF, 641kb

    Can we put an end to human smuggling?

    This edition of Migration Policy Debates scrutinises the factors that facilitate human trafficking, as well as the smuggling routes to OECD countries. It synthesises available evidence and reviews existing policy tools for tackling such crime.

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  • 12-November-2015

    English, PDF, 722kb

    How will the refugee surge affect the European economy?

    This edition of Migration Policy Debates provides an assessment of the possible economic impact of the refugee crisis. It stresses that while there will obviously be short-term costs arising from such large flows, there will also be sizeable economic and public-finance benefits provided refugees are integrated into the labour market.

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  • 3-November-2015

    English

    Connecting with Emigrants - A Global Profile of Diasporas 2015

    This publication describes the size and characteristics of emigrant populations by origin countries with a special focus on educational attainment and labour force status. It offers origin countries a detailed picture of the size and composition of their diasporas, as well as their evolution since 2000. It contains an overview chapter and six regional chapters, covering: Asia and Oceania, Latin America and the Caribbean; OECD countries; Non-OECD European and Central Asian countries; Middle East and North Africa; and Sub-Saharan Africa.  Regional chapters are followed by a regional note and country notes.

  • 22-September-2015

    English, PDF, 1,579kb

    Is this humanitarian migration crisis different?

    The current humanitarian crisis is unprecedented with an appalling and unacceptable human cost. This issue of Migration Policy Debates looks at the most recent developments in the humanitarian migration crisis and what makes this crisis different from previous ones.

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