Reports


  • 9-February-2015

    English, PDF, 97kb

    Going for growth 2015 - Mexico

    This country note from Going for Growth 2015 for Mexico identifies and assesses progress made on key reforms to boost long-term growth, improve competitiveness and productivity and create jobs.

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  • 3-February-2015

    Spanish

    Presentación del Estudio sobre Políticas de Integridad en México

    El Gobierno de México solicitó a la OCDE un Estudio sobre Políticas de Integridad, concentrado en el combate a la corrupción, la prevención de conflictos de interés y la integridad en el servicio público.

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  • 3-February-2015

    English

    Launch of OECD Integrity Review of Mexico

    The Government of Mexico have requested an OECD Integrity Review focusing on anti-corruption, conflict of interest prevention and integrity in the public service.

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  • 15-January-2015

    English

    OECD Institutional Investors Statistics 2014

    Institutional investors (investment funds, insurance companies and pension funds) are major collectors of savings and suppliers of funds to financial markets. Their role as financial intermediaries and their impact on investment strategies have grown significantly over recent years along with deregulation and globalisation of financial markets.

    This publication provides a unique set of statistics that reflect the level and structure of the financial assets of institutional investors in the OECD countries, and in the Russian Federation. Concepts and definitions are predominantly based on the System of National Accounts. Data are derived from national sources.

    Data include outstanding amounts of financial assets such as currency and deposits, securities, loans, and shares. When relevant, they are further broken down according to maturity and residency. The publication covers investment funds, of which open-end companies and closed-end companies, as well as insurance corporations and autonomous pension funds. Indicators are presented as percentages of GDP allowing for international comparisons, and at country level, both in national currency and as percentages of total financial assets of the investor. Time series display available data for the last eight years.

  • 8-January-2015

    English

    Economic Survey of Mexico 2015

    Mexico has embarked on a bold package of structural reform to break free from three decades of slow growth, low productivity, pervasive labour market informality and high income inequality. Major structural measures have been legislated.

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  • 7-January-2015

    English

    Fighting bid rigging in government contracts: Mexico-OECD partnership

    Mexico has partnered with the OECD to improve its procurement practices and step up its fight against bid rigging. In January 2011, Mexico's Social Security Department became the first public agency in Mexico (and in the world) to formally commit to adopt and implement the OECD Competition Committee’s Guidelines for Fighting Bid Rigging in Public Procurement.

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  • 7-January-2015

    English

    Fighting Bid Rigging in Public Procurement in Mexico - The CFE Report 2015

    This report documents procurement regulations and practices in Mexico's main electricity company (Comisión Federal de Electricidad) and makes policy recommendations in key procurement areas.

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  • 6-January-2015

    English

    OECD Urban Policy Reviews: Mexico 2015 - Transforming Urban Policy and Housing Finance

    In parallel to a sweeping structural reform agenda, Mexico announced in 2013 a new approach to housing and urban policy. Calling for a more explicit qualitative focus on housing and the urban environment, the policy shift is a welcome development. Mexico urbanised more rapidly than most OECD countries in the past half-century, in part as a result of the expansion of housing finance led by INFONAVIT and facilitated by policies aiming to expand access to formal housing. Yet the quantitative push for formal housing came with quantitative costs: inefficient development patterns resulting in a hollowing out of city centres and the third-highest rate of urban sprawl in the OECD; increasing motorisation rates; a significant share of vacant housing, with one-seventh of the housing stock uninhabited in 2010; housing developments with inadequate access to public transport and basic urban services; and social segregation. How can the Mexican authorities “get cities right” and develop more competitive, sustainable and inclusive cities? How can they improve the capacity of the relevant institutions and foster greater collaboration among them? How can INFONAVIT ensure that its lending activities generate more sustainable urban outcomes as it also fulfils its pension mandate and help Mexicans save more for retirement?

  • 6-January-2015

    English

    Urban Policy Reviews: Mexico 2015

    In parallel to a sweeping structural reform agenda, Mexico announced in 2013 a new approach to housing and urban policy. Calling for a more explicit qualitative focus on housing and the urban environment, the policy shift is a welcome development.

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  • 10-December-2014

    English, PDF, 350kb

    Key findings for Mexico: OECD Revenue Statistics and Consumption Tax Trends 2014

    The tax burden in Mexico increased by 0.1 percentage points from 19.5% to 19.6% in 2012. The corresponding figure for the OECD average was an increase of 0.4 percentage points from 33.3% to 33.7%. The Mexican standard VAT rate is 16%, which is below the OECD average. The average VAT/GST standard rate in the OECD was 19.1% on 1 January 2014.

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