Economy


  • 28-October-2016

    English

    Empowering the 40% of young Latin Americans not in formal jobs, education or training could spark new growth engines, says latest Latin American Economic Outlook

    Latin America and the Caribbean’s (LAC) GDP will shrink by between 0.9% and 1% in 2016, according to the latest estimates, the second consecutive year of negative growth and a rate of contraction the region has not seen since the early 1980s. According to the Latin American Economic Outlook 2017, the region should recover in 2017, but with modest GDP growth of between 1.5% and 2%, below expected growth in advanced economies.

    Related Documents
  • 12-February-2016

    English

    OECD Reviews of Pension Systems: Mexico

    This review assesses the Mexican pension system according to the OECD best practices and guidelines, and draws on international experiences and examples to make recommendations on how to improve it. It provides an international perspective on Mexico’s retirement income provision and a short and focused review of the Mexican pension system. The review covers all components of the pension system: public and private pension provision for public and private-sector workers. It provides recommendations, using OECD’s best practices in pension design, on how to improve the Mexican pension system and thus ameliorate the retirement income that people may receive from the pension system.

  • 14-October-2015

    English

    OECD reports wide gaps in well-being across Mexico’s states

    Improvements in health, access to basic services and housing have contributed most to raising standards of living of Mexicans over the past 15 years but further advances are needed to bring well-being indicators closer to the average of OECD countries, according to a new report.

    Related Documents
  • 18-September-2015

    English

    Corporate Governance of Company Groups in Latin America

    This report provides an overview of frameworks and experience in Latin America and internationally in dealing with the challenges associated with corporate governance of company groups. It describes their economic rationale, benefits and relevance in Latin America, and how they are defined, overseen and regulated. It also delves into some of the risks and more specific challenges involved in ensuring protection of minority shareholder rights and managing or minimising conflicts of interest within groups. It notes the rising importance of Latin American-based multinational company groups. Finally, it reviews existing international and regional guidance on corporate governance of company groups before assessing the more specific policy options and challenges in the region, and describing the conclusions reached by the Latin American Corporate Governance Roundtable and Task Force on Company Groups based on this report’s findings. Country-specific chapters provide more specific descriptions of the frameworks in place for corporate governance of company groups in Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Mexico and Peru.

  • 6-July-2015

    Spanish

    Conferencia Magistral sobre ¨El Futuro de la Productividad¨ - Una Productividad de Todos y Para Todos

    Bienvenidos a este primer Diálogo Global sobre el Futuro de la Productividad. Me da mucho gusto poder lanzar esta iniciativa, en colaboración con el Gobierno de México y con la participación del Secretario de Hacienda de nuestro país, Luis Videgaray, así como de Enrique Iglesias, una de las personas que más ha luchado por mejorar la productividad de América Latina.

  • 26-June-2015

    English

    Global dialogue on the future of productivity: Towards an OECD productivity network

    Luis Videgaray, Mexico’s Minister of Finance and Angel Gurría, OECD Secretary-General will co-host this event in Mexico City on 6-7 July 2015, with a welcoming by the President of Mexico. Participants will share their views on the key factors that will influence future productivity growth and the creation of an OECD Productivity Network.

    Related Documents
  • 8-April-2015

    English

    Sharing the fruits of growth with all Mexicans

    The government has introduced major structural reforms to fight poverty, improve the quality of education, create more jobs in the formal sector and move towards a universal social security system. This is a substantial accomplishment. However, Mexico needs to build a more inclusive state.

    Related Documents
  • 8-April-2015

    English

    What makes Mexicans happy?

    As in other countries, in Mexico income, education, health, job status and other individual characteristics are significantly associated with life satisfaction. These findings suggest that the higher average level of life satisfaction in Mexico is probably related to unobserved country characteristics.

    Related Documents
  • 6-March-2015

    English

    Boosting growth and reducing informality in Mexico

    Mexico has embarked on a bold package of structural reforms that will help it to break away from three decades of slow growth and low productivity. Major structural measures have been legislated to improve competition, education, energy, the financial sector, labour, infrastructure and the tax system, among many, and implementation has started in earnest.

    Related Documents
  • 9-February-2015

    English, PDF, 97kb

    Going for growth 2015 - Mexico

    This country note from Going for Growth 2015 for Mexico identifies and assesses progress made on key reforms to boost long-term growth, improve competitiveness and productivity and create jobs.

    Related Documents
  • 1 | 2 | 3 > >>