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Employment


  • 15-May-2019

    English

    Evaluating Latvia's Active Labour Market Policies

    This report on Latvia is the fifth country study published in a series of reports looking into how policies connect people with jobs. It focuses on Latvia's long-term unemployed and those at risk of long-term unemployment. The report analyses linked administrative microdata to evaluate quantitatively the impact of activation policies elaborated in Latvia’s Inclusive Employment Strategy 2015-2020. More specifically, it assesses the effectiveness of training measures, employment subsidies and a programme promoting regional mobility. This report derives policy lessons from the empirical results to help the Latvian authorities adjust the activation strategies and measures in order to strengthen labour market participation of the unemployed and improve their labour market outcomes, helping them move into more productive and better quality jobs.
  • 31-July-2018

    English, PDF, 320kb

    Latvia Policy Brief - Re-invigorating labour productivity growth in Latvia

    Better access to education and affordable housing would help strengthen the skills of the workforce, increase labour mobility and reduce skills matches.

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  • 31-March-2016

    English

    OECD Reviews of Labour Market and Social Policies: Latvia 2016

    Latvia has undergone major economic and social change since the early 1990s. Despite an exceptionally deep recession following the global financial crisis, impressive economic growth over the past two decades has narrowed income and productivity gaps relative to comparator countries in the OECD. But Latvians report low degrees of life satisfaction, very large numbers of Latvians have left the country, and growth has not been inclusive. A volatile economy and very large income disparities create pressing needs for more effective social and labour-market policies. The government’s reform programme rightly acknowledges inequality as a key challenge. However, without sustained policy efforts and adequate resources, there is a risk that productivity and income growth could remain below potential and social cohesion could be further weakened by high or rising inequality.
  • 18-February-2016

    English

    Investing in youth is key for fixing Latvia’s demographics

    Latvia faces a huge demographic challenge. Since restoration of its independence in 1991, the country lost more than a quarter of its resident population.The report "Investing in Youth: Latvia" states that investing in youth, by upgrading skills and promoting employment, is a priority if Latvia wants to offer its young people a positive outlook and address the demographic challenge.

  • 27-August-2015

    English

    Investing in Youth: Latvia

    This report provides a detailed diagnosis of the youth labour market and education system in Latvia from an international comparative perspective, and offers tailored recommendations to help improve school-to-work transitions. It also provides an opportunity for other countries to learn from the innovative measures that Latvia has taken to strengthen the skills of youth and their employment outcomes, notably through the implementation of a Youth Guarantee. 
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  • 27-August-2015

    English

    Latvia should expand work-based vocational training to boost young people’s job prospects

    Latvia should step up its efforts to improve the employment prospects of young people by continuing to reform its vocational education system and pursuing the commitments made as part of the Youth Guarantee to further reduce the share of young people under 30 who are not in employment, education or training.

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  • 11-October-2012

    English

    Workshop: Government approaches to supporting local economic and employment development (Riga, Latvia)

    Today many local communities are confronted with the challenge of reducing high and persistent unemployment and defining new sources of economic growth, all in the context of shrinking public resources. The event gathered representatives of ministries responsible for regional development and employment from Latvia, Lithuania and Estonia and selected OECD countries to exchange on approaches that work in addressing these challenges.

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