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  • 11-August-2020

    English

    Korea: Keep supporting people and the economy until recovery fully under way

    Korea has limited the damage to its economy from the Covid-19 crisis with swift and effective measures to contain the virus and protect households and businesses. Support for workers and the export-dependent economy should continue, given falling employment and the risk of prolonged disruption to trade and global value chains, according to a new OECD report.

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  • 7-July-2020

    English, PDF, 701kb

    OECD Employment Outlook 2020 - Key findings for Korea

    Korea was among the first countries hit by COVID-19 but the spread of the virus was contained without strict confinement measures thanks to early testing and tracing. About 476 thousand jobs were lost in April compared to a year earlier and 1.5 million employees took temporary leave, resulting in a decrease of 11.1% of total worked hours.

  • 24-June-2020

    English, PDF, 864kb

    Over the Rainbow? The Road to LGBTI Inclusion - How does Korea compare?

    This note provides a comprehensive overview of the extent to which laws in Korea and OECD countries ensure equal treatment of LGBTI people, and of the complementary policies that could help foster LGBTI inclusion.

  • 9-March-2020

    English, PDF, 1,262kb

    How's life in Korea?

    This note presents selected findings based on the set of well-being indicators published in How's Life? 2020.

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  • 14-November-2019

    English

    Government at a Glance

    Government at a Glance provides a dashboard of key indicators to help you analyse international comparisons of public sector performance.

  • 29-October-2019

    English

    Investing in Youth: Korea

    The series Investing in Youth builds on the expertise of the OECD on youth employment, social support and skills. It covers both OECD countries and key emerging economies. The report on Korea presents new results from a comprehensive analysis of the situation of young people in Korea, exploiting various sources of survey-based and administrative data. It provides a detailed assessment of education, employment and social policies in Korea from an international perspective, and offers tailored recommendations to help improve the school-to-work transition. Earlier reviews in the same series have looked at youth policies in Brazil (2014), Latvia and Tunisia (2015), Australia, Lithuania and Sweden (2016), Japan (2017), Norway (2018), and Finland and Peru (2019).
  • 28-October-2019

    English

    Rejuvenating Korea: Policies for a Changing Society

    Korean families are changing fast. While birth rates remain low, Koreans are marrying and starting a family later than ever before, if at all. Couple-with-children households, the dominant household type in Korea until recently, will soon make up fewer than one quarter of all households. These changes will have a profound effect on Korea’s future. Among other things, the Korean labour force is set to decline by about 2.5 million workers by 2040, with potential major implications for economic performance and the sustainability of public finances. Since the early 2000s, public policy has changed to help parents reconcile work and family commitments: Korea has developed a comprehensive formal day-care and kindergarten system with enrolment rates that are now on par with the Nordic countries. Korea also has one year of paid parental leave for both parents, but only about 25% of mothers and 5% of fathers use it, as workplace cultures are often not conducive to parents, especially fathers, taking leave. Cultural change will take time, but this review suggests there also is a need for additional labour market, education and social policy reform to help Koreans achieve both work and family aspirations, and contribute to the rejuvenation of Korean society.
  • 27-March-2019

    English, PDF, 692kb

    Society at a Glance 2019 - How does Korea compare?

    This country highlight puts the spotlight on lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) people: their numbers, their economic situation and well-being and policies to improve LGBT inclusivity. It also includes a special chapter on people’s perceptions of social and economic risks and presents a selection of social indicators.

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  • 28-January-2019

    English

    Korea should adapt its migration programmes to ensure continued success in the face of expected challenges

    Korea should adjust the categories and rules of its different labour migration programmes to better match labour migration to short-term and structural labour needs, according to a new OECD report.

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  • 20-December-2018

    English

    Korea must enhance detection and reinforce sanctions to boost foreign bribery enforcement

    Korea must step up enforcement of its foreign bribery laws and strengthen the capacities of law enforcement agencies to proactively detect and investigate the offence, according to a new report by the OECD Working Group on Bribery.

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