Working Papers


  • 15-September-2015

    English

    Achieving fiscal consolidation while promoting social cohesion in Japan

    With gross government debt of 226% of GDP, Japan’s fiscal situation is in uncharted territory and puts the economy at risk. Japan needs a detailed and credible fiscal consolidation plan, including specific revenue increases and measures to control spending to restore its fiscal sustainability.

  • 15-September-2015

    English

    Enhancing dynamism and innovation in Japan's business sector

    Innovation is key to boosting economic growth in the face of a rapidly ageing population. While Japan spends heavily on education and R&D, appropriate framework conditions are essential to increase the return on such investments by strengthening competition, both domestic and international, and improving resource allocation.

  • 7-August-2015

    English

    How is corporate governance in Japan changing? Developments in listed companies and roles of institutional investors

    OECD Corporate Governance Working Paper No.17. This report examines the influence of institutional shareholders and their activities towards good corporate governance, the historical changes to practices within shareholder meetings and the role that institutional shareholders have played in the improvement of corporate governance within Japanese listed companies.

    Related Documents
  • 27-May-2015

    English

    Internet Literacy in Japan

    The rise in Internet usage among young people has seen a corresponding increase in international concern regarding their online safety. In line with the Recommendation on the Protection of Children Online, the Japanese government has initiated efforts to develop improved indicators to measure Internet literacy among youth.

    Related Documents
  • 10-October-2014

    English

    The Role of National Ecosystem Assessments in Influencing Policy Making

    An ecosystem assessment is a social process through which the findings of science concerning the causes of ecosystem change, their consequences for human well-bring, and the management and policy options are evaluated. The main objective of the paper is to draw insights from experience in the UK, Japan, Spain and Portugal of the added value to policy making of undertaking national level ecosystem assessments.

    Related Documents
  • 20-August-2013

    English

    Japan's challenging debt dynamics

    This working paper presents the background and the details of the simulations behind Box 1.4 of the May 2013 OECD Economic Outlook. A small simulation model is used to evaluate the contribution that the three pillars of the government’s strategy – fiscal consolidation, growth-boosting structural reforms and higher inflation – could make to reversing the rise in Japan’s public debt ratio.

    Related Documents
  • 2-July-2013

    English

    Restructuring the electricity sector and promoting green growth in Japan

    The 2011 disaster and nuclear problems opened the door to a new energy policy, as they raised fundamental questions about the electricity system’s ability to prevent and respond to accidents.

  • 31-May-2013

    English

    Reforming agriculture and promoting Japan's integration in the world economy

    The problems of Japanese agriculture – in particular low productivity and the prevalence of part-time farmers and small plots have been evident for the past 50 years.

  • 28-May-2013

    English

    Restoring Japan’s fiscal sustainability

    With gross government debt surpassing 200% of GDP, Japan’s fiscal situation is in uncharted territory. In addition to robust nominal GDP growth, correcting two decades of budget deficits requires a large and sustained fiscal consolidation based on a detailed and credible multi-year plan that includes measures to control spending and raise revenue.

  • 13-September-2011

    English

    Japan: Labour market reforms to improve growth and equity

    Traditional Japanese labour market practices, which benefited both workers and firms during the high-growth era, are no longer appropriate in the context of slow economic growth and rapid population ageing.

    Related Documents
  • 1 | 2 | 3 > >>