Publications & Documents


  • 11-April-2016

    English

    Japan’s demographic and policy challenges in 5 charts - Insights blog

    Look at Japan and you see the future of many OECD countries. Extreme demographic shifts are re-sculpting the country in dramatic ways, defining future challenges and demanding new policy responses. Blog by Bill Below, on the challenges faced and the opportunities available.

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  • 11-April-2016

    English

    Press conference remarks on the report "Japan: Boosting Growth and Well-being in an Ageing Society"

    Japan has already taken some bold and determined steps in recent years to tackle its economic, social and environmental challenges. But broad-based reforms across a range of areas are still needed.

  • 11-April-2016

    English

    Launch of the 2016 OECD Territorial Review of Japan

    Japan's commitment to territorial development will be crucial in tackling the urgent challenge of population ageing and shrinking – a challenge which is the main focus of this report.

  • 11-April-2016

    English

    Seminar with Japanese business leaders on "Global Economic Challenges and the Way Forward with Promoting Diversity"

    Women represent a vast untapped resource for Japan. Their employment rate in 2014 was fully 18 percentage points below that of men. Closing that gap is particularly urgent for Japan: the total population in Japan has already begun to fall and is projected to decline by almost 25% by 2050. Moreover, the share of the elderly (65+) is projected to rise from around 26% today to almost 40% at mid-century.

  • 11-April-2016

    English

    Research Fellowships and Conference Sponsorship

    The Co-operative Research Programme (CRP)'s Call for Applications for conference sponsorship and research fellowships for funding in 2017 is now OPEN. The CRP supports work on sustainable use of natural resources in agriculture, forests, fisheries and food production.

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  • 11-April-2016

    English

    Japan: Boosting Growth and Well-being in an Ageing Society

    With 25 years of sluggish economic growth, Japan’s per capita income has fallen from a level matching the average of the top half of OECD countries in the early 1990s to 14% below that today. Weak growth, together with rapid population ageing, has driven public debt into uncharted territory. Revitalising growth is thus the top priority for the Japanese government. With the labour force shrinking more rapidly than the population, per capita output can only grow through improvements in labour productivity and labour force participation. Japan’s highly-skilled labour force and its technological leadership can help close the gap with leading OECD countries in per capita income. But broad-based structural reforms, as envisaged in the third arrow of Abenomics, are needed to allow these strengths to fully achieve their potential. The initial impact of Abenomics in 2013 was impressive, and the reform process needs to continue.

  • 11-April-2016

    English

    OECD Territorial Reviews: Japan 2016

    Japan is embarked on a demographic transition without precedent in human history: the population is both declining and ageing rapidly. This raises important questions about the country's future economic geography, as public policies will need both to respond to these shifts and also to shape them. Demographic change will have particularly important implications for the settlement pattern of the country, and this, in turn, will affect Japan's ability to sustain economic growth and the well-being of its citizens. This Review therefore focuses on the spatial implications of demographic change and the response of spatial policies to it, particularly as these interact with other policies aimed at sustaining the productivity growth that a "super-ageing" Japan will need in order to maintain its future prosperity. The Japanese authorities have recently put in place a complex package of long-term spatial and structural policies aimed at meeting this challenge. Their experience should be of first-order interest to other OECD countries, as most face the prospect of rapid population ageing and many are also projected to experience significant population decline over the coming decades.

  • 11-April-2016

    English

    Japan will need reforms to ease economic blow of a shrinking workforce

    Japan must make revitalising growth its number one priority with reforms to boost productivity and encourage more women and older people into jobs to compensate for its rapidly shrinking labour force, according to the OECD.

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  • 8-April-2016

    English

    Mr. Angel Gurría, Secretary-General of the OECD, in Tokyo from 11 to 13 April 2016

    The Secretary-General met with Prime Minister Shinzo Abe as well as several Ministers and high-level authorities of Japan. He spoke at a number of events and also presented the OECD Territorial Review of Japan and the publication Japan: Boosting Growth and Well-being in an Ageing Society.

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  • 1-April-2016

    English

    National Accounts of OECD Countries, General Government Accounts 2015

    The 2015 edition of National Accounts of OECD Countries, General Government Accounts is an annual publication, dedicated to government finance which is based on the System of National Accounts 2008 (SNA 2008) for all countries except Chile, Japan, Korea and Turkey (SNA 1993). It includes tables showing government aggregates and balances for the production, income and financial accounts as well as detailed tax and social contribution receipts and a breakdown of expenditure of general government by function, according to the harmonised international classification, COFOG. These detailed accounts are available for the general government sector. Data also cover the following sub-sectors, according to availability: central government, state government, local government and social security funds.

    The data in this publication are also available on line via www.oecd-ilibrary.org under the title OECD National Accounts Statistics, General Government Accounts (http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/na-gga-data-en and http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/na-gga08-data-en).

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