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  • 12-October-2020

    English

    OECD Development Co-operation Peer Reviews: Japan 2020

    The OECD’s Development Assistance Committee (DAC) conducts reviews of the individual development co‑operation efforts of DAC members once every five to six years. DAC peer reviews critically examine the overall performance of a given member, not just that of its development co‑operation agency, covering its policy, programmes and systems. They take an integrated, system‑wide perspective on the development co‑operation activities of the member under review and its approach to fragility, crisis and humanitarian assistance. Japan combines diplomatic, peace and development efforts to achieve sustainable development and implements the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) through a whole-of-society approach. It values self-reliant development, country ownership and the mutual benefits of development co-operation for Japan and its partner countries. Japan is recognised as a global champion of disaster risk reduction. Increasing official development assistance could strengthen Japan's leadership and commitment to the SDGs and a mechanism would help ensure coherence between domestic policies and global sustainable development objectives. Whole-of-government country policies would ensure synergies across Japan's portfolio and it could be more explicit about how programmes reduce poverty. More streamlined systems and procedures would make Japan a more agile donor.
  • 20-August-2020

    English

    The International Online Conference to Address Water-related Disaster Risk Reduction under COVID-19: “Water, DRR and Economics under COVID-19”

    The 6% decline in global GDP that we project for 2020 in our most recent Economic Outlook is larger than any other decline in the 60 years of OECD’s existence. And in case of a second wave of infections, global GDP could decline by more than 7.5%.

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  • 20-August-2020

    English

    Structural adjustment and changes to employment use in Japan

    This paper examines the determinants of structural adjustment in Japan and identifies several factors that explain the use of certain employment types. Its findings are based on a novel plant-level dataset that provides considerable detail on the types of employees used by Japanese manufacturers between 2001 and 2014. Analysis of this dataset shows that growth in the diffusion of robotics is linked to fewer non-regular employees, which seems to be partially driven by the positive association between robot adoption and the dismissal of certain types of non-regular workers. It also finds that offshoring from Japan to other countries contributes to the use of both regular and non-regular workers, while higher plant productivity is related to the use of more regular workers. Finally, establishments that experienced job dismissals appear to substitute non-regular workers for regular workers.
  • 23-July-2020

    English

    Revenue Statistics in Asian and Pacific Economies 2020

    Revenue Statistics in Asian and Pacific Economies is jointly produced by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD)’s Centre for Tax Policy and Administration (CTP) and the OECD Development Centre (DEV) with the co-operation of the Asian Development Bank (ADB), the Pacific Island Tax Administrators Association (PITAA), and the Pacific Community (SPC) and the financial support from the governments of Ireland, Japan, Luxembourg, Norway, Sweden and the United Kingdom. This edition includes a special feature on the tax policy and administration responses to COVID-19 in Asian and Pacific Economies. It compiles comparable tax revenue statistics for Australia, Bhutan, People’s Republic of China, Cook Islands, Fiji, Indonesia, Japan, Kazakhstan, Korea, Malaysia, Mongolia, Nauru, New Zealand, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Samoa, Singapore, Solomon Islands, Thailand, Tokelau and Vanuatu ; and comparable non-tax revenue statistics for Bhutan, the Cook Islands, Fiji, Kazakhstan, Mongolia, Nauru, Philippines, Papua New Guinea, Samoa, Thailand, Tokelau and Vanuatu. The model is the OECD Revenue Statistics database which is a fundamental reference, backed by a well-established methodology, for OECD member countries. Extending the OECD methodology to Asian and Pacific economies enables comparisons about tax levels and tax structures on a consistent basis, both among Asian and Pacific economies and with OECD, Latin American and Caribbean and African averages.
  • 7-July-2020

    English, PDF, 790kb

    OECD Employment Outlook 2020 - Key findings for Japan

    The average monthly decline in hours worked in Japan was 7.9% in the first three months of the COVID-19 crisis, compared to a decline of 2.6% during a comparable period in the the Global Financial Crisis. While the decline was smaller than in some other countries, total hours worked in April were almost 19% below their peak at the end of 2019.

  • 7-July-2020

    Japanese, PDF, 1,148kb

    Employment Outlook 2020 - Key findings for Japan (in Japanese)

    日本では、新型コロナウイルス感染症による最初の3か月間の平均労働時間の減少率は7.9%であった(世界金融危機時の減少率は2.6%)。他のいくつかの国に比べて減少幅は小さかったものの、本年4月の総労働時間は2019年末のピーク時を19%近く下回っている。

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  • 24-June-2020

    English, PDF, 778kb

    Over the Rainbow? The Road to LGBTI Inclusion - How does Japan compare?

    This note provides a comprehensive overview of the extent to which laws in Japan and OECD countries ensure equal treatment of LGBTI people, and of the complementary policies that could help foster LGBTI inclusion.

  • 30-April-2020

    English, PDF, 383kb

    Taxing Wages: Key findings for Japan

    The tax wedge for the average single worker in Japan remained the same at 32.7 percentage points between 2018 and 2019. The OECD average tax wedge in 2019 was 36.0 (2018, 36.1).

  • 14-April-2020

    English

    Synthesising good practices in fiscal federalism - Key recommendations from 15 years of country surveys

    The design of intergovernmental fiscal relations can help to ensure that tax and spending powers are assigned in a way to promote sustainable and inclusive economic growth. Decentralisation can enable sub-central governments to provide better public services for households and firms, while it can also make intergovernmental frameworks more complex, harming equity. The challenges of fiscal federalism are multi-faceted and involve difficult trade-offs. This synthesis paper consolidates much of the OECD’s work on fiscal federalism over the past 15 years, with a particular focus on OECD Economic Surveys. The paper identifies a range of good practices on the design of country policies and institutions related strengthening fiscal capacity delineating responsibilities across evels of government and improving intergovernmental co-ordination.
  • 26-March-2020

    English

    Asia-Pacific Competition Update: OECD/Korea Policy Centre newsletter

    This newsletter contains information about work on competition law and policy in the Asia-Pacific region that is taking place within the framework of the OECD-Korea Policy Centre Competition Programme.

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