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  • 15-April-2019

    English

    OECD-BIAC Japan/Keidanren Working Lunch: 2019 Economic Survey of Japan and Japan’s G20 Presidency

    Let me begin with the context. The global expansion continues to lose momentum and world trade growth has slowed sharply. Trade tensions have clouded the outlook for firms and risk disrupting investment and global value chains.

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  • 15-April-2019

    English

    Further reforms in Japan needed to meet the challenges of population ageing and high public debt

    The Japanese economy is undergoing the longest expansion in its post-war history, marked by strong job creation and business investment. Government policy must overcome the intertwined challenges posed by rapid population ageing and high government debt to ensure sustainable and inclusive growth for future generations, according to a new report from the OECD.

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  • 12-April-2019

    English

    Mr. Angel Gurría, Secretary-General of the OECD, in Tokyo on 15-16 April 2019

    Mr. Angel Gurría, Secretary-General of the OECD, will be in Tokyo on 15-16 April 2019 on an Official visit to Japan, to present the OECD 2019 Economic Survey of Japan. During his visit, the Secretary-General will hold bilateral meetings with Prime Minister Abe, as well as several Ministers and other high-level Japanese officials.

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  • 10-April-2019

    English, PDF, 733kb

    The Squeezed Middle Class - How does Japan compare?

    This country fact-sheet presents key figures from "Under Pressure: The Squeezed Middle Class". This report analyses the trends of middle-income households in areas such as employment, consumption, wealth and debt, as well as perceptions and social attitudes. It also includes recommendations for protecting middle-class living standards and financial security in the face of economic challenges.

  • 27-March-2019

    English, PDF, 694kb

    Society at a Glance 2019 - How does Japan compare?

    This country highlight puts the spotlight on lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) people: their numbers, their economic situation and well-being and policies to improve LGBT inclusivity. It also includes a special chapter on people’s perceptions of social and economic risks and presents a selection of social indicators.

  • 27-March-2019

    Japanese, PDF, 1,570kb

    Society at a Glance 2019 - How does Japan compare? in Japanese

    This country highlight puts the spotlight on lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) people: their numbers, their economic situation and well-being and policies to improve LGBT inclusivity. It also includes a special chapter on people’s perceptions of social and economic risks and presents a selection of social indicators.

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  • 6-February-2019

    English

    OECD Reviews of Public Health: Japan - A Healthier Tomorrow

    This review assesses Japan's public health system, highlights areas of strength and weakness, and makes a number of recommendations for improvement. The review examines Japan's public health system architecture, and how well policies are responding to population health challenges, including Japan's ambition of maintaining good population health, as well as promoting longer healthy life expectancy for the large and growing elderly population. In particular, the review assesses Japan's broad primary prevention strategy, and extensive health check-ups programme, which is the cornerstone of Japan's secondary prevention strategy. The review also examines Japan's exposure to public health emergencies, and capacity to respond to emergencies as and when they occur.
  • 20-December-2018

    English

    Japan should reform retirement policies to meet challenge of ageing workforce

    Japan must improve job quality and further reform the mandatory retirement age to address upfront the challenges of its rapidly ageing and shrinking labour force, according to a new OECD report.

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  • 20-December-2018

    English

    Working Better with Age: Japan

    Currently, Japan has the highest old-age dependency ratio of all OECD countries, with a ratio in 2017 of over 50 persons aged 65 and above for every 100 persons aged 20 to 64. This ratio is projected to rise to 79 per hundred in 2050. The rapid population ageing in Japan is a major challenge for achieving further increases in living standards and ensuring the financial sustainability of public social expenditure. However, with the right policies in place, there is an opportunity to cope with this challenge by extending working lives and making better use of older workers' knowledge and skills. This report investigates policy issues and discusses actions to retain and incentivise the elderly to work more by further reforming retirement policies and seniority-wages, investing in skills to improve productivity and keeping up with labour market changes through training policy, and ensuring good working conditions for better health with tackling long-hours working culture.
  • 4-December-2018

    English, PDF, 542kb

    Good jobs for all in a changing world of work: The new OECD Jobs Strategy – Key findings for Japan

    The digital revolution, globalisation and demographic changes are transforming labour markets at a time when policy makers are also struggling with slow productivity and wage growth and high levels of income inequality. The new OECD Jobs Strategy provides a comprehensive framework and policy recommendations to help countries address these challenges.

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